Foiled Vortex ~cool or not cool~


 

Jim Lampe

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Sometimes I vortex a whole spatchcocked bird, like I am tonight.
I foil the vortex inside to catch the mess poultry leaves behind...
my question is, is this right? Am I defeating the purpose of the vortex by closing up the bottom?
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JimK

TVWBB Olympian
Seems it would be totally fine when using the vortex with the coals on the outside. Otherwise, what's the alternative - squeeze a drip pan in there?
 

Lynn Dollar

TVWBB Wizard
Might as well just cook indirect with the Weber baskets on both sides and a water pan down the middle. I don't see any advantage to using the Vortex.

But IMO, the Vortex works so well because it creates convection.
 

Dwain Pannell

TVWBB Hall of Fame
IMO there’s no ‘right’ or ’wrong’. I always have tin foil around but never seem to have those little foil pans so this looks like a good way to catch chx juice to me.

BTW, lately I‘ve been roasting spatchcock birds over a WSM without the water pan installed. I really like wings, whole birds, pieces, etc over live coals.
 

Jim Lampe

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Might as well just cook indirect with the Weber baskets on both sides and a water pan down the middle. I don't see any advantage to using the Vortex.

But IMO, the Vortex works so well because it creates convection.
Advantage IS convection
Whole bird done in 40 minutes

my initial observation was: am I defeating the purpose of the vortex does by blocking the air flow by using foil to catch drippings.
After successful cooks using it this way, I’ve decided it’s ok.

so...

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thank you all for your help 😉
 
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JimK

TVWBB Olympian
Advantage IS convection
Whole bird done in 40 minutes

my initial observation was: am I defeing the purpose of the vortex does by blocking the air flow by using foil to catch drippings.
After successful cooks using it this way, I’ve decided it’s ok.

so...

View attachment 20970

thank you all for your help 😉

Yep! I'd say you're good!
 

GrantT

New member
I don't have a vortex, but cook spatchcocked poultry in under 40 minutes regularly....I just use a drip tray underneath. I just think your vortex is just acting as a glorified drip tray TBH. But if it works, it works.
 

Kevin L (NKY)

TVWBB Guru
What is right or wrong if it works, isn't that what this fiurm is all about experimentation trying new things, expanding the envelope. Jim you just showed us something new and different, and best of all it works. Great looking bird by the way.
 

timothy

TVWBB Olympian
Yep, I've done it. I think I saw it on the vortex site. Did a whole chicken on a vertical roaster set into the vortex, same deal on my vertical skewer.
Did a butt on the grate like your chicken and it came out great.

Edit:http://owensbbq.com/vortex.html
 
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Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
I don’t think it’s a defeat situation but, it does make me think that a stainless steel bowl might be pretty much as efficient. The convection properties are enhanced by the way the air flows. There might be a little loss of airflow with the foil but, I have a hard time thinking it would be much. Doing the reverse (cone up) the convection current is much faster...maybe.
 

Rich Dahl

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Whatever works...works. Chicken looks great, I remember the first time I used my vortex and didn't put any foil under the thighs, OMG what a mess took me an hour to clean out the kettle.
 

Jim C in Denver

TVWBB Super Fan
It's just another spin on indirect cooking.

What you are doing is pretty much what Vortex itself recommends for chicken. Vortex calls it the "infrared" method:

This is a method that allows a perfect roasted protein without the need for an expensive rotisserie or having to spatchcock the bird before cooking. The Vortex deflects the direct heat while radiating high heat and giving your food the outdoor cooking flavor. Place Vortex wide-end up with a piece of foil in the bottom to block the air flow as well as catch drippings. Place bird or small roast on the beer-can holder (with or without liquid in it). Pour chimney full of ‘set’ coals equally around the Vortex and close the lid.
 

GrantT

New member
The only problem I see with equating it to the "infrared" method is that the vortex is lined with foil here - basically adding an insulating layer from direct heat/infrared transmission....so I do not think that really applies.

Pretty sure this is just convection cooking from the heat rising around the sides and the vortex is just acting as a drip pan.
 

Kyle in Woodstock

TVWBB Wizard
I've done a beer-can chicken with the bird sitting down on the charcoal grate inside the vortex. That works well and is very easy to setup.

Your method looks good too, I'm just too lazy to cut the bird in half and smash it flat.
 

EricV.

New member
Interesting, I would have never thought that was the right configuration, considering how they recommend to cook a full bird.
 

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