Deck lighting for the grills


 

BillSmith

TVWBB Pro
I have a rectangular deck with two sides attached to the house. I have my grills away from the house along the back rail. I’m looking for lighting suggestions.

Here are some options that I’m considering:

1. Mount floodlights on the side of the house. Would work ok for one grill but might cause a shadow issue for the other grill.

2. Find some sort of post that I can mount to the deck between the two grills. The lights attach to the post and shine downwards on the grill. I think this is my preferred option if I can find a suitable post. Here’s one that might work:

https://www.rablighting.com/product/PS4-11-10WT

3. I have seen these string lights that seem to be the rage. They look like little light bulbs hanging down from a cord. Run this along the outside perimeter of the deck. Not sure if this will provide enough light for cooking.

Any other suggestions of thoughts? I don’t think I’m interested in a grill handle light but you can try to convince me otherwise.
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Mike Freel

TVWBB Pro
Your ideas would all work. In my opinion decide if you are looking to light your deck for yourself and friends to enjoy sitting on the deck in the evening or if it is to shed light on your grill for cooking. My wife and I enjoy sitting on our deck with minimal or no lighting and maybe a candle lamp for atmosphere. I have a "grill light" that I attach to my grill and it gives me enough light to cook.
Each person has their own wants and needs. Just make sure that what you do meets your wants and needs. Then enjoy grilling and sitting outside.
 

J Hasselberger

TVWBB Pro
Unless you have multiple light sources, you will always have shadow issues. The grill handle light or "miner's hat" light are practical solutions. Like Mike, we like to sit on the deck at night. Flood lights are too bright. The string of small lights works great for this, but not really bright enough for cooking. (I got several 25' strings of white Christmas lights at Lowe's for about $10 a string. Five years and they are still going strong.) I'd be thinking of something specific to shine on the grill surface.

Jeff
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
This is a quandary that I share with you! Lighting a grill is kind of an odd challenge, you want enough light to see but not be blinded, I also am not terribly fond of the blue quality of LED lights in most lamps. I’m leaning toward more “Edison” lights, they are less intense and offer a nice warm light and are offered in even an LED version which I do like I’m working on the best way to make them work on the new deck and provide enough light for grilling.
 

JKalchik

TVWBB Wizard
J Hasselberger has a good point, single light source will frequently mean shadows.

I got a tri-head LED array with a light sensitive motion sensor (only goes off after dark,) a claimed 1,900 lumens IIRC, to replace the incandescent floodlamp by the back door. My grill is petty much right in line with the head at 90 degrees, so I get a good wash from my left hand side over the grill. I've been been very happy with it, I wouldn't hesitate do do something like it again. YMMV.
 

Colin

TVWBB Member
My covered patio is dimmly lit for the most part but I can turn on two exterior porch light that help light the cooking area but not enough at the grill. I picked up this little battery powered light with a magnetic base that works really good for putting light right where I need it.
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Some of the work tool lights by Milwaukee, DeWalt, etc may work well also. Just throwing out an idea, hope it helps.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Colin, the problem I have with that, is color correction, Those light are all about brightness, food is not. Real color is what I want and as easy as those things are (I have several) the reality is as far as finesse, they fall far short. I’m pulling a couple of my Coleman lantern collection out of their lair when I finish cleaning the garage and will have those closer to hand by fall.
Blue light makes food look revolting in my opinion. It may be bright but, appetizing, it surely is not.
 

Todd NC

TVWBB Pro
I use an LED headlamp. No shadows, lights up whatever I'm looking at, and a portable solution. I considered putting up lights but the shadows would drive me nuts.
 

BillSmith

TVWBB Pro
I use an LED headlamp. No shadows, lights up whatever I'm looking at, and a portable solution. I considered putting up lights but the shadows would drive me nuts.

I have used an LED headlamp before. The only issue I have is the bugs are attracted to it and they start diving at my face.

Another option that I might have to consider would be some sort of clamp light that I could attach to my deck railing. Like a snake light that one might use on a desk but rated for exterior use. I'll have to look around.
 

Todd NC

TVWBB Pro
I have used an LED headlamp before. The only issue I have is the bugs are attracted to it and they start diving at my face.

Another option that I might have to consider would be some sort of clamp light that I could attach to my deck railing. Like a snake light that one might use on a desk but rated for exterior use. I'll have to look around.

Yea, bugs could be an issue. I mainly use the headlamp in the winter when darkness comes way too early. The bugs are mostly gone here during those months.
 

DuaneMac

TVWBB Member
Colin, the problem I have with that, is color correction, Those light are all about brightness, food is not. Real color is what I want and as easy as those things are (I have several) the reality is as far as finesse, they fall far short. I’m pulling a couple of my Coleman lantern collection out of their lair when I finish cleaning the garage and will have those closer to hand by fall.
Blue light makes food look revolting in my opinion. It may be bright but, appetizing, it surely is not.
Another Coleman lantern user here! Plenty of bright natural light. They can be hung or placed where needed. I keep one in my BBQ cabinet next to my grill.
Here’s last night’s Tri-tip cook—nice and bright!
 

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Chris S in YEG

TVWBB Fan
Colin, the problem I have with that, is color correction, Those light are all about brightness, food is not. Real color is what I want and as easy as those things are (I have several) the reality is as far as finesse, they fall far short. I’m pulling a couple of my Coleman lantern collection out of their lair when I finish cleaning the garage and will have those closer to hand by fall.
Blue light makes food look revolting in my opinion. It may be bright but, appetizing, it surely is not.

Thanks for the reminder Timothy. I am always "in the dark" when doing long smokes and the single deck light does not cut it. I have a good Coleman lantern sitting in my garage that since I got a trailer I do not use. Time to dust it off and fire it up for my next smoke.
 

Russ in CFL

TVWBB Member
I bought one of these from Lowes and mounted it above my grilling area. Been using it for a couple months now and it works good for checking temps and color on overnight smokes or grilling. I figure for $29 if it goes out I'll just buy something else and battery power makes it so I can mount it anywhere.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
As soon as I can get back to the back corner where I put a “locker” for them (why in blazes I decided that was a good spot I will never know!) I will haul them out and clean them up! Season is almost upon us!
 

Pat G

TVWBB Gold Member
I have some pretty bright flood lights but the way my grill is positioned causes me to cast a shadow on the grilling surface.
I'm planning on doing something like this:

 

Robert McGee

TVWBB Gold Member
Check this out:


My answer will be found on Post #11.

Keep on smokin',
Dale53 :wsm:
 

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