At VERY long, long last...My Skyline Dream is a reality!


 

Jon Tofte

TVWBB Olympian
As one of the charter members of our unofficial "Skyline Club" I am pathetically behind in having my own entry completed. Working a job plus two part-time endeavors plus family dynamics makes it hard for me to set aside the kind of time that serious grill restoration seems to take. Plus, those of you who have seen my yard and shed pictures know that I also have to keep working on flip projects.

However, this Thanksgiving weekend I am thankful for many things and not the least of which is that my Skyline is finally done! (Well, I am still waiting on my printer friend to move me up from the bottom of the list so I can replace the tank warning label and the fuel gauge decals...)

It took me so long to get my wood slats done that I was horrified to find that the end caps of my hood needed repainting. The grill was never used, but I guess I didn't paint it well enough and almost a year of sitting outside in the heat with a Weber cover rubbing the metal must have done it in. I disassembled and repainted:

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For the wood slats, I used 316 stainless screws from Marsh Fasteners. Others have reported not having much issue with the OEM regular screws, but most of the old grills I have recovered here in Florida have totally rusted out tray Z brackets and screws. I also used stainless steel Z brackets my sheet metal shop friend made for me before he sold his business.

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A number of you, with good reason, warned me against trying to use red oak for the slats. I probably will only use up my remaining stock on one more grill and not try this again. But, it was the look that I was after. So, after staining with dark walnut stain (a suggestion I picked up here) the slats were coated with 4 coats of McCloskey Man O War spar varnish (a recommendation from Brian in Atlanta). It IS good stuff, so I am hoping my slats will last a while.

I know many like to find clear cedar with little or no grain for their grills, but I guess I am the opposite. I just love how the red oak grain stands out. I picked some of the best pieces for the top left tray:

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I used the more modern slider rail for the left side fold up tray. My sheet metal friend was always promising to make me some right hand slider rails, but never did. After working with it I concluded that all I needed to do was take a grinder to the end of the rod and it would go right in the hole in the frame:

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I don't plan to balance a big turkey on the right side, but it does work fine. For the closed position, I went ahead and did some crude fabrication using an already bent tool holder clip.

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At this point I don't see any big issue. It doesn't carry much weight and shows no signs of sliding. If it does, I will drill another hole to secure it to the frame. The slider is definitely easier, but with the tank holder in the way, it would be a very tight fit anyway. I also don't expect to use this tray all that much, so the old style way is OK with me:

Here are a few more pictures. I am glad to at last be a full-fledged Skyline Club member:cool:

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One Last Picture!

I am not any photographer, but this last picture just happened to work out. I love the Chicago Skyline on the hood contrasted with the reflection of palm trees. It kind of sums up my story and the story of this grill;)

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Excellent work Jon. Now I know why you have been quiet the last few days.
I love the choice of wood and stain. I have a problem with that Sox logo, but
we will discuss that another time. Until then, that is one of the finest grills I have
ever seen.
 
That sir is not a grill but a work of art! That has to be the most beautiful grill I have ever seen. It was worth the wait for sure.
 
Jon,

You say it sits outside? Man as pretty as that is, I would throw out the couch and put that baby in the living room! I also bought one of the vintage grill lights and was wanting to see how much light it actually put out when lit. Did you use the right side side tool holder from the Silver B as well?

Bobby
 
Beautiful job now all you have to do is actually USE than thing. Maybe Christen it with some Chicago Polish or Italian sausages
 
Jon. It was worth the wait. That is awesome. I am glad you didn't have to deal with the dreaded fade on the hood. I also think the oak looks great and even with Cedar, I would want the grain to show as much as possible. That is what makes wood so nice looking on these grills. Pure class. I might have one of those rod holder clips on one of my grills in storage. If so, I will send it to you next spring so you can replace the tool holder clip that you fabbed up.

Enjoy that thing. Great job.

Oh, too bad you didn't get your metal working guy to fab up about 3 dozen of those shelf brackets for you. They are getting harder and harder to come buy.

Also, I like how you added the black handles like the one that I did.
 
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Jon,

You say it sits outside? Man as pretty as that is, I would throw out the couch and put that baby in the living room! I also bought one of the vintage grill lights and was wanting to see how much light it actually put out when lit. Did you use the right side side tool holder from the Silver B as well?

Bobby

Bobby,
I will see what my wife thinks:rolleyes:!

I do wish I had an inside place for it, but my deck is the best place I can give it. My wife sees no reason why we need two grills on the deck. I want a smaller one for basic lunch or small meals and save this Skyline for special occasions. She says “Why can’t you just use the big grill?”

p.s. I did use the newer Silver style end pieces on both ends. You can't see the tool holder one on the right very well in the pictures I posted.
 
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Beautiful job now all you have to do is actually USE than thing. Maybe Christen it with some Chicago Polish or Italian sausages

Larry,

I like that idea! Maybe you can share some tips as I have never done sausage. My wife also likes Chicago Italian beef; would you know anything about that?
 
Jon. It was worth the wait. That is awesome. I am glad you didn't have to deal with the dreaded fade on the hood. I also think the oak looks great and even with Cedar, I would want the grain to show as much as possible. That is what makes wood so nice looking on these grills. Pure class. I might have one of those rod holder clips on one of my grills in storage. If so, I will send it to you next spring so you can replace the tool holder clip that you fabbed up.

Enjoy that thing. Great job.

Oh, too bad you didn't get your metal working guy to fab up about 3 dozen of those shelf brackets for you. They are getting harder and harder to come buy.

Also, I like how you added the black handles like the one that I did.

Thanks, Bruce (and everyone else for your kind words)!

Actually, my hood also has the dreaded fade, but I decided it was just a minor inconvenience to be able to have a Skyline! The black handles I guess shows that great minds run in the same channel. I had saved a handle and bought a tool holder from Weber quite a while ago. I thought it was so cool that you had the same idea, and your pictures allowed me to see how it would actually look. Besides being practical, I think it does make the older style Genesis look more substantial. The black also sets off the wood, and the "gap" doesn't really bother me.
 
Larry,

I like that idea! Maybe you can share some tips as I have never done sausage. My wife also likes Chicago Italian beef; would you know anything about that?

Jon, here's one that might work. I've made this on my 2000 a couple of times.

THE GREAT SECRET CHICAGO BEEF SANDWICH
RECEIPE #1


2 ½ pounds Beef Roast or I used Choice Boneless Eye of Round
Prepare the day before in a pan
1 Tsp Red pepper Flakes
1 Tsp Garlic Powder
1 Tsp dried Basil
1 Tsp dried Oregano
1 Tsp Black Pepper
½ Tsp Salt
4 cups of water
Some Italian Bread (substitute steak rolls if you can’t find)

Rub ½ portion of 1st. 6 dry spices onto Beef Roast and add 1 cup of water to the pan. Place roast on a rack place in the pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes, then lower temperature to 230 degrees and add 3 cups of water and add remaining dry spices to the water. Cook until thermometer reaches 145 med rare.

Remove the roast and let stand 20 minutes and slice thin. Refrigerate with the pan juices overnight.

Next day preheat the oven to 450 degrees and bake for 15 minutes with juices.
For extra taste, cut long slices of green pepper and slices of onion, place in juices then place these strips between the meat slices when making the sandwich.
Slice the bread lengthwise and then in the length you want. To make the sandwiches (juicier) dip the bread face down in the juices.
WARNING…. If you 1 ½ or double the recipe, DO NOT DOUBLE THE RED PEPPER FLAKES. (Makes it real hot)
You can freeze left over juices and meat together and then re-warm.
 
Jon, here's one that might work. I've made this on my 2000 a couple of times.

THE GREAT SECRET CHICAGO BEEF SANDWICH
RECEIPE #1


2 ½ pounds Beef Roast or I used Choice Boneless Eye of Round
Prepare the day before in a pan
1 Tsp Red pepper Flakes
1 Tsp Garlic Powder
1 Tsp dried Basil
1 Tsp dried Oregano
1 Tsp Black Pepper
½ Tsp Salt
4 cups of water
Some Italian Bread (substitute steak rolls if you can’t find)

Rub ½ portion of 1st. 6 dry spices onto Beef Roast and add 1 cup of water to the pan. Place roast on a rack place in the pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes, then lower temperature to 230 degrees and add 3 cups of water and add remaining dry spices to the water. Cook until thermometer reaches 145 med rare.

Remove the roast and let stand 20 minutes and slice thin. Refrigerate with the pan juices overnight.

Next day preheat the oven to 450 degrees and bake for 15 minutes with juices.
For extra taste, cut long slices of green pepper and slices of onion, place in juices then place these strips between the meat slices when making the sandwich.
Slice the bread lengthwise and then in the length you want. To make the sandwiches (juicier) dip the bread face down in the juices.
WARNING…. If you 1 ½ or double the recipe, DO NOT DOUBLE THE RED PEPPER FLAKES. (Makes it real hot)
You can freeze left over juices and meat together and then re-warm.


Very similar to what I learned from my Grandma and my mother. Though in their "recipe" there is heavy use of butter, parsley, mushrooms and Romano and or Parmesan cheeses
 

 

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