Any disadvantage toResting pork butts in an oven set to warm 155 degrees?

Tom Raveret

TVWBB Pro
Are there any disadvantages to resting Pork shoulder foiled in the ovenset to warm at 155 for a couple of hours rather than putting them into a cooler with towels?
 

Dustin Dorsey

TVWBB Honor Circle
I would vent it first to stop the cooking. Maybe let it drop to 170 on the counter and then put it in the oven. I wish my oven would hold 155!
 

timothy

TVWBB Hall of Fame
For a couple of hours you'll be fine in an off oven. Its an insulated box, same as a cooler or micro.

Tim
 

BFletcher

TVWBB Wizard
I did it once. If it hurt I don't know it. For the record, in my feeble mind, I believe that is called holding. Resting is pulling it from your cooker and setting it on your countertop for a bit to stop the cook.
 

PaulH.

New member
I do it often. Rest on the counter until the IT drops to 170 or so and then put in the oven at 150. Comes out fine
 

Dustin Dorsey

TVWBB Honor Circle
Franklin holds their briskets for hours in holding ovens set to 140. Those ovens are probably better at temp control than a standard oven. I've heard of people hold at something like 170.
 
I'm a huge fan of putting wrapped brisket in an ice chest for a couple of hours after the cook, but I've never done it with pork butt.

I'd be interested in hearing the experience of anyone who has put butts in an ice chest for an hour or two.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
As member TonyUK says “Works a Treat!” I try to build that time in with every butt, they are really great with an hour or two “relaxation chamber” wait.
 

JKalchik

TVWBB All-Star
Pretty much any animal protein that comes out of my smoker gets a rest. Brisket gets the longest rest by far, minimum of 2 hours, 4-6 is not unacceptable. Pork butts still profit, so does chicken (30 minutes to an hour.)
 

MartinB

TVWBB Pro
"Rest" is really kind of a misnomer in my opinion.

Steaming hot 200-degree meat, dries out rapidly.

Warm 140 degree meat, stays much juicier.

I don't think it actually reabsorbs much juices, etc. When the muscle fibers contracted they squeeze that liquid out, it really doesn't go back in. But, you prevent drastic evaporative losses from exposing extremely hot meat to air.

My goal is really just to let it cool down to eating temperature, without drying out by being exposed to air when hot. Can wrap it in foil and leave it on the counter if you want it to cool fast, or put it in a cooler if you want to hold it 6 or 8 hours. There's some amount of additional tissue breakdown that occurs while the meat is still hot. Further tenderizing it.

I held my last brisket 6+ plus hours, it cooked much faster than I had planned. Turned out great.
 
Last edited:

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Did anyone else see the guy doing an “Italian standing rib roast” where he said to let the meat rest an equal amount to the roasting time!?? The piece he carved looked amazing but, the timing of that just goes against my grain.

Martin, the last brisket I did went way faster than I’d planned too, like five hours faster! Strange.
 

J Hasselberger

TVWBB Pro
Franklin holds their briskets for hours in holding ovens set to 140. Those ovens are probably better at temp control than a standard oven. I've heard of people hold at something like 170.
That is correct, Dustin. We picked up a whole Franklin brisket several months back at around noon and brought it home in a cooler (about an hour). Dinner was a 5:30. We put it in the oven and turned the heat on the lowest (170) and waited for it to hit about 155, then shut it off. We did this a number of times during the afternoon. Franklin double wraps their takeaway briskets in butcher paper, which gets pretty soggy after an hour or so. Following the Franklin staff advice, I unwrapped it and put about 6 tablespoons of butter on top, then rewrapped it for the oven, sitting in a sheet pan. It was still very hot when I sliced it and it was Franklin perfect.

Jeff
 

Top