Juho A

TVWBB Member
Very nice! Well done. I actually have only been using lump charcoal so far in my kamado, even though I do have a bag of briquettes in the garage. I haven't found a solution with lump charcoal so far on how to get the desired amount of smoking wood burnt in the process. Even when I place my hickory chunks right on top of the spot where the charcoals are lit, I still end up with the hickory chunks largely unburned, and the smokiness of my cooks has been rather mild. I do realise this might be easier to control on a WSM as it burns more fuel and therefore you have better likelihood on catching fire on the smoking wood chunks, too, but anyway, if you come up with any pointers for this with your experiments with lump charcoal, I would be interested to hear.
 

AlexKendall

New member
Very nice! Well done. I actually have only been using lump charcoal so far in my kamado, even though I do have a bag of briquettes in the garage. I haven't found a solution with lump charcoal so far on how to get the desired amount of smoking wood burnt in the process. Even when I place my hickory chunks right on top of the spot where the charcoals are lit, I still end up with the hickory chunks largely unburned, and the smokiness of my cooks has been rather mild. I do realise this might be easier to control on a WSM as it burns more fuel and therefore you have better likelihood on catching fire on the smoking wood chunks, too, but anyway, if you come up with any pointers for this with your experiments with lump charcoal, I would be interested to hear.
I definitely don't have that problem using briquettes in the WSM. I could potentially see the issue happening using lump charcoal, we'll see! Have you considered trying the wood chips instead of the big wood chunks? Something like this: Wood chips
 

RalphTrimble

TVWBB Diamond Member
...I haven't found a solution with lump charcoal so far on how to get the desired amount of smoking wood burnt in the process. Even when I place my hickory chunks right on top of the spot where the charcoals are lit, I still end up with the hickory chunks largely unburned, and the smokiness of my cooks has been rather mild...
Have you tried the minion method of setting up your charcoal? This is basically setting up a trail of coals that burn a little at a time rather than lighting a big pile of coals, can be accomplished with a number of setups... with this method you can set wood chunks or chips along the burn path so they ignite periodically throughout the cook.
In a kamado I've used what I call the "ring of fire" minion method where I put a circular steel mesh in the center with coals arranged on the outside. Here is a picture of this setup.
 

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