New Owner


 

James_Roo

New member
Hey guys! First time poster and a new owner of a 22” WSM. I fired it up for the first time 2 days ago using Soo’s Donut method. I found it took about an hour to get into smoke range. I did notice that after a few hours the temp kept rising to the point it was pushing 275 degrees. At this point I had all 4 vents completely closed (except top, it was very slightly cracked) and the temp wouldn’t go down. I used the rest of the charcoal from a previous nights cook on a kettle for my starter. Prolly 50-60 partially burned briquettes. I also ran out of fuel before my ribs were done but that’s just because I didn’t add a full basket to the start.

Is this a common issue with Soo’s Donut since the longer the coals burn the more contact there is with unlit coals? Or did I just start with too many lit briquettes? I wasn’t sure how much I should use since they were partially burned and it was fairly cold out.

Also, my plan for Thanksgiving is to smoke a turkey. Not sure how big yet. Any tips for that would be greatly appreciated!
 

James_Roo

New member
Also, tips for a long overnight smoke would be appreciated. The turkey may call for it and I would love to do a brisket and pork butt some day.
 

Chris Allingham

Administrator
Staff member
If you've not visited my website virtualweberbullet.com, it contains 20+ years of WSM articles with recipes (including many turkey recipes) and lighting techniques. All are written for the 18.5" WSM, but the cooking times and temps stay the same, you just need to increase the amount of charcoal used because it takes more fuel to run a bigger cooker.

Long overnight cooks are achieved by loading that charcoal ring fully to the top. I am not a lump charcoal user, I use Kingsford briquets for consistency and lower price and that's what you'll see in all my articles. If you can find B&B oak charcoal briquettes at Ace Hardware, that's a very good product. We used to recommend Weber charcoal, a very good product, but sadly it's been discontinued. C'mon Weber, bring it back! :D

My recommendation is NOT to cook turkey for a long time overnight. It's tender by nature and you'll get better skin and faster results by smoking it quickly in the 300-350*F range for just a couple of hours until it hits 160-165*F in the breast. You'll see this approach in many of my turkey articles.

Good luck, have fun, and keep posting your questions.



collage.jpg
 

Brock Gingery

TVWBB Member
If you've not visited my website virtualweberbullet.com, it contains 20+ years of WSM articles with recipes (including many turkey recipes) and lighting techniques. All are written for the 18.5" WSM, but the cooking times and temps stay the same, you just need to increase the amount of charcoal used because it takes more fuel to run a bigger cooker.

Long overnight cooks are achieved by loading that charcoal ring fully to the top. I am not a lump charcoal user, I use Kingsford briquets for consistency and lower price and that's what you'll see in all my articles. If you can find B&B oak charcoal briquettes at Ace Hardware, that's a very good product. We used to recommend Weber charcoal, a very good product, but sadly it's been discontinued. C'mon Weber, bring it back! :D

My recommendation is NOT to cook turkey for a long time overnight. It's tender by nature and you'll get better skin and faster results by smoking it quickly in the 300-350*F range for just a couple of hours until it hits 160-165*F in the breast. You'll see this approach in many of my turkey articles.

Good luck, have fun, and keep posting your questions.



View attachment 40170
Those are some absolutely beautiful birds
 

Chris Allingham

Administrator
Staff member
Those are some absolutely beautiful birds
Turkey is one of the easiest things to make in the WSM. I can honestly say that each of those photos is from a single successful cook and DOES NOT represent 10 failures to arrive at that one perfect turkey...and there are more that have never made it to the website. I've probably cooked turkey more than anything else over 20+ years.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Olympian
It’s something which you will need to learn as you go, it’s all about learning from others and from your own experience, it will come grasshopper, it will come.
If your smoker is brand, spankin‘, new, it will need some time to “season” is the kind term. “Gunk up” is the vernacular.
Welcome aboard!
 

Richard Garcia

TVWBB Pro
Still learning some new smoking techniques on my WSM 18" Classic that I bought new in the year 2008;)

Relax and enjoy your new WSM through your many future experiences of trial and error and success.

Also, being a "ACTIVE" VWB Forum Member since the year 2008 was a "gift from the Gods".
 

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