Home ground chuck and sirloin burgers and some with BACON 🥓


 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
Nice bun choice!! Looks delicious!!
A juicy burger requires a strong foundation. Ciabattas are perfect for this.

Each burger was around 135g, 4.5 oz. Cooked direct over JD 2.5 minutes a side then moved to indirect. Pulled at around 150° and rested. Had to double wash my hands after dinner. These were good mess makers.

Served with a fresh romaine salad. No fried sides, by consensus.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
Needs more bacon! ;)
The wife and kids ate the bacon burgers. They were around 25% bacon in the blend. I kept a few plain. I had bacon for breakfast and wound up drinking 1/2 gallon water today because of it.

I also have some Neapolitan dough in its rise right now. Hopefully I can cook it Tuesday evening. Four shells at 248g each. I spent the last week reading about doughs and preparation methods. Fingers crossed it comes out good.
 
Last edited:

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
Hmmm,,,I'd really like to see a picture of one of those with one bite taken out! :unsure:🤣
i try to avoid food bites in my pics. it just looks weird to me.

i was going to make a bacon brie for the wife, where you wrap the ground beef around a chunk of brie. that with the bacon would have been real good IMO.

the burgers were nice and juicy. with all those fixings, the mess was running down my fingers and onto the plate. but not greasy. these two cuts combined were very steak-like and meaty. my blend was around 50/50 each cut. the chuck was only trimmed of silverskin and all its fat remained (chuck runs around 70/30 or 75/25 in roast form, Costco butcher cut). the sirloin is very lean so these burgers needed to be packed firmly to keep their shape before hitting the grill, and kept cold until the grate was hot.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
Now that's a burger made to perfection. Just the basics very nice.
Thank you, Rich. My daughter said during dinner that I've ruined burgers for her. I asked why and she said, (she had just gotten home from Disneyland that morning) because she had a burger at Disneyland and it wasn't even close to what we eat at home. That she cannot eat burger out except for In N Out (which is a different burger than a steak burger).

The kids have learned that grinding your own meat and mixing different cuts makes for a better burger. I encourage everyone to try grinding your own beef for burgers. This step alone, even with just chuck, will elevate your burger game and doesn;t add that much more time to making patties.

I'm still using my KA metal grinder attachment. It works for these small batches. This cook was 3.5 pounds of beef total. And the beef is double ground, which is a must for consistency and texture.

 

Rich Dahl

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Barb and I grind our own also. I was using the KA with the grinding attachment. The KA is almost 40 years old and I didn't like the strain the grinder was putting on it and the fact to grind 20 Lbs would take an hour or more.
Didn't want to replace the KA to the tune of $500+ So I bought this.


The thing is a beast. We just did 18 pounds of chuck Barb cut into chunks, total time to grind 18 pounds, 9 minutes. Grinds as fast as you can put the chunks in the hopper.
Don't know how long it will last I've only done about 40-50 pounds so far. But even if I went through three of them that would still be less than half of the price of a new KA.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
Barb and I grind our own also. I was using the KA with the grinding attachment. The KA is almost 40 years old and I didn't like the strain the grinder was putting on it and the fact to grind 20 Lbs would take an hour or more.
Didn't want to replace the KA to the tune of $500+ So I bought this.


The thing is a beast. We just did 18 pounds of chuck Barb cut into chunks, total time to grind 18 pounds, 9 minutes. Grinds as fast as you can put the chunks in the hopper.
Don't know how long it will last I've only done about 40-50 pounds so far. But even if I went through three of them that would still be less than half of the price of a new KA.
at $70, that's a steal! i will throw one into my Amazon cart and sleep on it. it took me 10 minutes just to do the 3.5# of burger yesterday. sounds like this grinder and really chew it up and make "minced meat" of things in no time (punny, I know.)
 

Greg Part

TVWBB Member
Thank you, Rich. My daughter said during dinner that I've ruined burgers for her. I asked why and she said, (she had just gotten home from Disneyland that morning) because she had a burger at Disneyland and it wasn't even close to what we eat at home. That she cannot eat burger out except for In N Out (which is a different burger than a steak burger).

The kids have learned that grinding your own meat and mixing different cuts makes for a better burger. I encourage everyone to try grinding your own beef for burgers. This step alone, even with just chuck, will elevate your burger game and doesn;t add that much more time to making patties.

I'm still using my KA metal grinder attachment. It works for these small batches. This cook was 3.5 pounds of beef total. And the beef is double ground, which is a must for consistency and texture.

Very nice ”boigers“! I bought the KA meat grinder last year as a “present” to myself as I got fed up with bone chips in my store bought ground beef that only I seem to get but no one else around the table bites down on. From this summer onward, I’m grinding my own meat which I’m going to procure through a butcher shop instead of the supermarket. Any tips would be appreciated.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
Very nice ”boigers“! I bought the KA meat grinder last year as a “present” to myself as I got fed up with bone chips in my store bought ground beef that only I seem to get but no one else around the table bites down on. From this summer onward, I’m grinding my own meat which I’m going to procure through a butcher shop instead of the supermarket. Any tips would be appreciated.
i'm a huge fan of costco's meat department. they've done well for me for many years. i try to buy cryovac when i can so i get better value and cut my own steaks and freeze what's for the next cook(s).

there are many different burger blends you can make. i'd recco you start simple and easy; ground chuck roast. around $4.49 a pound, or more these days, you're getting a nice 75/25 to 80/20 burger, depending how much fat you seek when you buy the chuck roast. i tend to buy a 3.5 to 4 pounder which we make our burger from.

the burgers in this cook were 4.5 ounces each. 5 oz is a nice sized burger. 6 oz is a huge burger. 8 oz is if you're a glutton for a hefty burger. IMO, 8 oz is insane, you might as well cook a steak!

when trimming a chuck roast, cut off and discard the silver skin. silver skin does not grind.

i'll have to check my grinder to advise which plate i'm using but i believe it's the largest grinding plate and i always do a double grind. semi frozen meat is best so the fat won't gum up in your grinder. yup, you'll be working with cold, near frozen beef but it works well to grind like this.

my KA is a 325 or 350 watt one, heavy duty, whatever that means these days. i run on speed 4 when grinding.

you can mix is sirloin meat with chuck which these were which make for a nice steak burger. very beefy in flavor without being too dry or mealy where your burger will fall apart. so the trick is enough fat, but never too much fat.

i've done some 65/35 burger on my gasser and those burger generated some serious flame kisses.

i've done 100% ribeye burgers, for fun, and those were great!

my fave would have to be a 50/25/25 of chuck, short rib and brisket, in that order. to me this is the best beef burger flavor and fat wise. many higher end restaurants, ($18+ for a burger) will run this blend and charge you for it.

reply back with any other questions you might have. fresh ground beef is so much better than store ground mystery burgers.

you can grill, flat top or cast iron your burgers. all work well and all have their place, depending what you want to eat.

but the spread. you must have a good spread for your burger. and so much more to go with it for that next-level experience.

welcome to the grind your own rabbit hole. there's a few people here already. they know who they are.
 

Greg Part

TVWBB Member
i'm a huge fan of costco's meat department. they've done well for me for many years. i try to buy cryovac when i can so i get better value and cut my own steaks and freeze what's for the next cook(s).

there are many different burger blends you can make. i'd recco you start simple and easy; ground chuck roast. around $4.49 a pound, or more these days, you're getting a nice 75/25 to 80/20 burger, depending how much fat you seek when you buy the chuck roast. i tend to buy a 3.5 to 4 pounder which we make our burger from.

the burgers in this cook were 4.5 ounces each. 5 oz is a nice sized burger. 6 oz is a huge burger. 8 oz is if you're a glutton for a hefty burger. IMO, 8 oz is insane, you might as well cook a steak!

when trimming a chuck roast, cut off and discard the silver skin. silver skin does not grind.

i'll have to check my grinder to advise which plate i'm using but i believe it's the largest grinding plate and i always do a double grind. semi frozen meat is best so the fat won't gum up in your grinder. yup, you'll be working with cold, near frozen beef but it works well to grind like this.

my KA is a 325 or 350 watt one, heavy duty, whatever that means these days. i run on speed 4 when grinding.

you can mix is sirloin meat with chuck which these were which make for a nice steak burger. very beefy in flavor without being too dry or mealy where your burger will fall apart. so the trick is enough fat, but never too much fat.

i've done some 65/35 burger on my gasser and those burger generated some serious flame kisses.

i've done 100% ribeye burgers, for fun, and those were great!

my fave would have to be a 50/25/25 of chuck, short rib and brisket, in that order. to me this is the best beef burger flavor and fat wise. many higher end restaurants, ($18+ for a burger) will run this blend and charge you for it.

reply back with any other questions you might have. fresh ground beef is so much better than store ground mystery burgers.

you can grill, flat top or cast iron your burgers. all work well and all have their place, depending what you want to eat.

but the spread. you must have a good spread for your burger. and so much more to go with it for that next-level experience.

welcome to the grind your own rabbit hole. there's a few people here already. they know who they are.
WoW! You’ve provided me with a plethora of info, options and tips to “digest”. Thanks! :)

My KA is the 6 qt. 575w motor (on sale for $300!) because I’m planning on making cake and pizza doughs with yeast and didn’t want to run the risk of straining or burning out the motor. I had read that working with super cold or near frozen beef makes the grinding process easier.

I shop Sam’s Club and they usually have a decent choice of prime and choice meats but I’m going to give our independent butcher shop a try. I‘m thinking a mix of sirloin and chuck ground separately then mixed together without any additional ingredients (to begin with). I should “KISS”

The metal meat grinder was the better choice of the 2 KA offers. The sausage stuffer option pushed me over the edge.

After seeing your mouthwatering creations, I’m definitely going to give grinding my own meat a try this summer!
 
Last edited:

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
WoW! You’ve provided me with a plethora of info, options and tips to “digest”. Thanks! :)

My KA is the 6 qt. 575w motor (on sale for $300!) because I’m planning on making cake and pizza doughs with yeast and didn’t want to run the risk of straining or burning out the motor. I had read that working with super cold or near frozen beef makes the grinding process easier.

I shop Sam’s Club and they usually have a decent choice of prime and choice meats but I’m going to try our independent butcher shop a try. I‘m thinking a mix of sirloin and chuck ground separately then mixed together without any editions ingredients (to begin with). I should “KISS”

The metal meat grinder was the better choice of the 2 KA offers. The sausage stuffer option pushed me over the edge.

After seeing your mouthwatering creations, I’m definitely going to give grinding my own meat a try this summer!
Here’s that 65/35 burger. Quite an event when cooking these. I’d recco 70/30 as your fattiest burger. The 65/35 dripped everywhere when eating them.

1653584886554.jpeg

Just note, I’m doing what everyone can do. So don’t be afraid. Just go for it. Experiment and enjoy the process.

Then you can move up to a bacon bleu burger. Those are a huge hit here at home.

Post your pics when ready.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
Delicious looking burger! That bun looks super delicious and makes me want to go toast some bread.
that ciabatta goes well when toasted, and then dipped in EVOO with balsamic, fresh ground black pepper, a pinch of dried italian herbs and some fresh grated pecorino. that and some cold antipasti, along with a few glasses of chianti have been dinner on more than one occasion. and don't forget the roasted red peppers!
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
WoW! You’ve provided me with a plethora of info, options and tips to “digest”. Thanks! :)

My KA is the 6 qt. 575w motor (on sale for $300!) because I’m planning on making cake and pizza doughs with yeast and didn’t want to run the risk of straining or burning out the motor. I had read that working with super cold or near frozen beef makes the grinding process easier.

I shop Sam’s Club and they usually have a decent choice of prime and choice meats but I’m going to try our independent butcher shop a try. I‘m thinking a mix of sirloin and chuck ground separately then mixed together without any editions ingredients (to begin with). I should “KISS”

The metal meat grinder was the better choice of the 2 KA offers. The sausage stuffer option pushed me over the edge.

After seeing your mouthwatering creations, I’m definitely going to give grinding my own meat a try this summer!
one note, on the chuck/sirloin, do around 75% chuck to 25% sirloin. the sirloin has little to no fat so you'll need a fatty chuck to hold the grind together. you could also keep some fat trimmings in your freezer, say in 2 oz baggies, so you can add fat as needed, when needed. i do tend to pack this blend a little tighter when making these burgers (pressing the meet to form balls and then into patties). so when you're grilling them, they don't fall apart.

when i cook these in a CI, i make a 2 to 2.5 oz burger and gently pack the meat. this way i get more nooks and crannies on the beef which create a nice texture of the CI sear and beef flavor. basically it helps build a nice crust without the burger being all crust. you want the beef both with and without crust.

anyway, you're loaded with tons of data. go forward and achieve greatness!
 

 

Top