Tri Tip


 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Gonna be doing another SRF Tri Tip today and got my eyes on doing it in the pellet popper. What's the consensus of how to approach it? Upper heat range right off (400+) or low/slow? It's just under 3lbs BTW
 

Lew Newby

TVWBB Gold Member
When cooking something on a pellet grill for the first time, I recommend cooking at the same temp that you use on your other cooker. That way, you have a basis for comparison. Otherwise, you’re comparing apples and oranges. Change your cooker, not your process.
 

John K BBQ

TVWBB All-Star
Getting a reverse sear might be tough on pellet smoker... no harm in trying it thou. Maybe smoke at low temp for a while and then take the meat off and crank it up high and get some crust at the end? Or you could do the final sear on your gas grill since you'll already have all the good smoke flavor on the meat...
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I’d go low and slow until 110 and sear on your gasser.
Gasser will be on corn duty :D I'm leaning towards doing it similar to how I did it last time on the Genesis. Relatively "hot". I roasted it at about 375 IIRC. So I think I may push the pellet grill to 400 and let 'er rip. Pull it at 125 and rest it
 

DanHoo

TVWBB Honor Circle
Larry, I've cooked more tri tip than any other meat and my personal favorite is a low temp smoke with pecan until it hits 120F internal and then reverse sear it.

Hands down this has been the most consistent way for me to cook it.

I've used Pecan, Cherry, hickory, mesquite, competition blended pellets and Pecan has been my favorite.

when I had the Pellet, I would put the tri tip on cold from the refrigerator with the pellet on P6, second lowest temp smoke setting. lowest was P7 and I had a couple flame outs at P7 so stopped using it.

I'd put the TT on the upper rack with a temp probe and just let it go. My pit boss had a "sear grate" so I could get direct fire so I'd pull the TT, wrap it and get that going which took 10 to 15 mins to get it really hot. I'd then do 30 seconds a side until it felt right and IT was 125 to 130.

Rest again then slice.

Hot works too, yet I have found I have to be more attentive to the cook.

looking forward to the pics
 

Rich Dahl

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
The last two I did on the Camp Chef was HH around 375 on the upper rack until it hit 125. Mine has a sear grilling option and I seared them for about 3 minutes a side, came out great.
 

Darian Hofer

TVWBB Super Fan
Larry, I've cooked more tri tip than any other meat and my personal favorite is a low temp smoke with pecan until it hits 120F internal and then reverse sear it.

Hands down this has been the most consistent way for me to cook it.

I've used Pecan, Cherry, hickory, mesquite, competition blended pellets and Pecan has been my favorite.

when I had the Pellet, I would put the tri tip on cold from the refrigerator with the pellet on P6, second lowest temp smoke setting. lowest was P7 and I had a couple flame outs at P7 so stopped using it.

I'd put the TT on the upper rack with a temp probe and just let it go. My pit boss had a "sear grate" so I could get direct fire so I'd pull the TT, wrap it and get that going which took 10 to 15 mins to get it really hot. I'd then do 30 seconds a side until it felt right and IT was 125 to 130.

Rest again then slice.

Hot works too, yet I have found I have to be more attentive to the cook.

looking forward to the pics
Agree Dan. It also makes it very easy to time the Tri Tip with dinner time as it can rest after slow smoke if needed. Just a quick high temp sear and your ready to slice and eat.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Well, tri tip is history. Sadly I could not use my fav rub on it because I was showing it to my hypochondriac daughter who saw WAY down the ingredient list "soybean oil". Now I don't have a clue what that is doing in a dry rub a=or how it got there, but she "claims" to have an allergy to it. She's a piece of work in her own right and a whole story too long to write here. So I used a Weber rub which was meh so flavor wise I think I spoiled that beautiful piece o' meat. In any case from a technical standpoint the cook was near flawless. I brought the small end up to almost 140 and the big end to 125. With a grill temp of 420. The cook went quickly, the meat got a nice "bark" on it, even a bit of a smoke ring and nice flavor (other than the rub). Sorry I was so busy I forgot to take more photos. Just this one. It's of the hunk I gave to my son in law. He loved it. So impressed gonna look for his own pellet grill (maybe even the one I have)
1664197893872.jpeg
 

Karl Quist

TVWBB Pro
Tri tip looks like it turned out just fine. Sorry about the missed opportunity with the rub though. Maybe just invite the son-in-law next time.
 

Ed P

TVWBB Diamond Member
Soybean oil in a dry rub is used to keep the dry ingredients mixed together and prevent any sort of "settling" where the heavier ingredients tend to migrate to the bottom or away from the lighter ones. It adds just a bit of "stickiness" to the dry ingredients. There is very, very, very little oil needed.
 
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LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Soybean oil in a dry rub is used to keep the dry ingredients mixed together and prevent any sort of "settling" where the heavier ingredients tend to migrate to the bottom or away from the lighter ones. It adds just a bit of "stickiness" to the dry ingredients. There is very, very, very little oil needed.
You can't tell her that. She's the most paranoid person I think I have ever met. I really thought I raised her better. :D I raised her to love tractors, now she won't even go outside and ride their own, (paranoid about the bugs), oh my allergies. She's terrified of the CV19. Won't be seen without a mask. I haven't seen her face in over 2 years now. Honestly getting to the point of preferring she just stay at home. Pretty sad what she's let herself become.
 

 

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