Spirit II (Natural Gas) grill won't sear.... (warning: Manifesto!)


 

A Lee

TVWBB Fan
Here's a ribeye done on my q1200 when it was brand new. It used to get up to 600f when it was new. Now it maxes out around 500F on the hood thermometer, but still does a decent job searing.

My BK Signet actually gets hotter than the Q1200. It can pin the hood thermometer at 700F, and amazingribs.com claims theyve hit 800F. However, I find that grill a bit scary for searing, especially at flashpoint temperatures.
 

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RobSmith

TVWBB Member
Here's a ribeye done on my q1200 when it was brand new. It used to get up to 600f when it was new. Now it maxes out around 500F on the hood thermometer, but still does a decent job searing.

My BK Signet actually gets hotter than the Q1200. It can pin the hood thermometer at 700F, and amazingribs.com claims theyve hit 800F. However, I find that grill a bit scary for searing, especially at flashpoint temperatures.
THAT's what I'm talking bout !

(What is that thing, nuclear powered?)
 

Jon Tofte

TVWBB Olympian
THAT's what I'm talking bout !

(What is that thing, nuclear powered?)
Weber Qs - including the hard-to-find CharQ are all excellent grillers. If working right, they can certainly lay on a great sear:

Weber Q Steak.jpeg

CharQ:
Weber CharQ steak.jpeg

I believe it is the combination of the radiant heat from the cast aluminum body, the well retained heat in the cast iron, and the simple and close distance from the cooking source (gas or charcoal) and the food.
 

ManuelRojas

New member
Weber Qs - including the hard-to-find CharQ are all excellent grillers. If working right, they can certainly lay on a great sear:

View attachment 59148

CharQ:
View attachment 59149

I believe it is the combination of the radiant heat from the cast aluminum body, the well retained heat in the cast iron, and the simple and close distance from the cooking source (gas or charcoal) and the food.


for my taste thats way too much char, i preffer golden brown.
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I think the trick is to get the sear without turning your ribeye into beef jerky. I think a lot of times when some one puts too much emphasis on the sear, they wind up with a cut of beef that is hitting well north of 150 internally.
 

Jon Tofte

TVWBB Olympian
If you want a lot of sear, but still stay rare or medium rare inside, I guess that's where the super high heat grills they use at steak house come in. Lucky for me, I actually LIKE medium-well (yes, I know that is a heresy and makes me an outlier). I actually aim for 160 degrees internal.:eek: That's a lot easier to cook to and get the outside done without burning.

I also think that there is a difference between searing and burning. Even the first two steaks I posted, while they have a lot of grill marks from the wide cast iron grate slats, were not BURNED. Again, it is all a matter of taste. I just personally don't go for the totally blackened, crusty exterior regardless of what the internal temperature is.
 

DanHoo

TVWBB Honor Circle
If you want a lot of sear, but still stay rare or medium rare inside, I guess that's where the super high heat grills they use at steak house come in. Lucky for me, I actually LIKE medium-well (yes, I know that is a heresy and makes me an outlier). I actually aim for 160 degrees internal.:eek: That's a lot easier to cook to and get the outside done without burning.

I also think that there is a difference between searing and burning. Even the first two steaks I posted, while they have a lot of grill marks from the wide cast iron grate slats, were not BURNED. Again, it is all a matter of taste. I just personally don't go for the totally blackened, crusty exterior regardless of what the internal temperature is.
20220912_082040.jpg
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I just throw my steaks on, monitor the temps and try to make sure I get them off at about 125-130 internal. The crust and sear marks are what they are. If they wind up with a nice crust or pretty grill marks, then I call that a bonus. Just doesn't make or break a steak with my uncivilized but very active pallet.
 

Joe Anshien

TVWBB Emerald Member
It does not directly help searing on a Spirit, but Tom Horsman just posted this on searing a steak I thought you may enjoy. Could do the same on a SJ or WGA.
 

A Lee

TVWBB Fan
I think the trick is to get the sear without turning your ribeye into beef jerky. I think a lot of times when some one puts too much emphasis on the sear, they wind up with a cut of beef that is hitting well north of 150 internally.
I agree, perfect doneness is more important than perfect sear, but it's best when you achieve both.

I find steak photos to be useless without images of the doneness level, so here's the inside shot of the ribeye I posted earlier. It was cooked on the Q1200.
 

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ManuelRojas

New member
Here's a ribeye done on my q1200 when it was brand new. It used to get up to 600f when it was new. Now it maxes out around 500F on the hood thermometer, but still does a decent job searing.

My BK Signet actually gets hotter than the Q1200. It can pin the hood thermometer at 700F, and amazingribs.com claims theyve hit 800F. However, I find that grill a bit scary for searing, especially at flashpoint temperatures.

to me, this is perfect sear. golden brown juicy.
 

RobSmith

TVWBB Member
So, long story (duh!) short - Weber/Ace agreed to take back the E-310 Spirit II grill, if I bought another Weber. Some of your responses here, and discussion with Weber led me to the Genesis E-325s (Pictured).

After paying Ace $999 plus tax (Total: Old Weber + $481 = New Genesis), I'm now in posession of a Genesis.

Hopefully, I'll find time to assemble it this week, and start waiting for my checking account to recover a bit before I can afford meat to test it out.

End of saga: Thanks to all you guys for your patience and advice. There were some very helpful responses, and some that were just dang funny. All were appreciated!
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
True. The big box stores typically refer to the "manufacturers warranty" and wipe their hands of it as soon as it is loaded in the back of your truck.
 

 

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