Knife sharpener


 

Wolgast

TVWBB Olympian
I use the edge pro apex....A quick lerning curve(doing some knifes for family and friends) Puts a great edge on my setup. But its a prodject to setup and to clean when you are done. If i just wanna maintain an edge on my cheap knifes i use an Chefs choice kinda sharpener. No cleaning and i pull it from the drawer and a few strokes and back into the drawer. But then again you dont get the razor affect witch all Kitchen nerds is worth.
 

Rich Dahl

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I've got the one recommended by Americas Test Kitchen the Chefs Choice model 130. It does a good job for what it is and is easy to use. That said if you're after that super fine edge I don't think you can beat using a quality stone, I'm just too much of a klutz to do a good job with a stone.
 

Dann B

TVWBB Super Fan
RogerS, I'm a self admitted knife geek. For electrics, the Chef's Choice 130 is a great sharpener, but I wouldn't use it on an expensive knife, it's kind of a one trick pony in that it has one set angle. They have a model that claims to do European and Japanese angles, but again, there is just one choice for each.

An electric you might consider is either the basic WorkSharp Knife and tool sharpener, or their new Ken Onion model, which does all the things the original did, but also boasts angles from 15-30, has wider belts, adjustable speed, and some other bells and whistles. One thing to know is that since they are belt sanders, they will put a convex edge on your knives instead of a bevel, some say that's more durable, some disagree.

The Apex Edge Pro and Wicked Edge are two really nice sharpeners, the downside (in my mind) to the Apex is if you don't want to scratch up your knife you need to tape everything but the edge before sharpening. There is also a bit of a learning curve at first because you need to be somewhat ambidextrous with the Apex. Wicked Edge doesn't have that issue, but it is pricy, and less portable.

I finally, after trying all these, have begun using Japanese water stones, but am just learning, and only doing inexpensive knives at the time
 

Darren C.

TVWBB Pro
I've been looking at sharpeners recently. Maybe you can give me some good advice. I have pretty much always sharpened by hand on stones and followed by a steel. But, I've had a variety of mixed results. Sometimes I get an edge that shaves. Sometimes not. Sometimes I get a satisfactory edge, but then what seems like a short time, they are lose their edge. So, I put them back on the stones and next thing I know, they are getting worse. I've come to the conclusion that I am not as good at the art as I thought I was. I am currently using 3 DWT diamond stones.

The other day, I grabbed an old cheapo accu sharp and was surprised how well it did. I put the knife on the steel a few times and was pretty dang satisfied. But, I feel like I could do better. I've read decent comments about the spyderco triangle sharpener. But it still relies on holding the knife vertical, which would probably be easier to be consistent with. I just don't think I can justify the expense of the Wicked Edge. That's what I'd probably choose if it weren't so expensive. The Apex would be good, but it seems like a lot to set up and maintain.

My knives are mostly Victorinox. I get them from a local butcher supply.

Should I just keep trying to improve with what I have or invest in something that helps keep a consistent angle?
 

Daum

TVWBB Super Fan
Through lots of trial and error (with an emphasis on error), I learned to do freehand sharpening on Japanese water-stones. I use a water-stone set of various brands, ranging from 200 grit (a rough stone which removes a decent amount of steel) all the way up to 16,000 grit (a fine-grit stone which puts a mirror polish on the blade edge). For me, it was well worth the time and effort to learn freehand sharpening, and it's actually become a hobby of mine.

Any suggestions for materials/videos to watch? I have a Smith tri hone, basically 3 different grits. I've gotten better with practice, but still am far from good. Usually takes me a few tries through the rotation to get a knife sharp, but when I do I love it! At some point I want to be able to trust myself enough to sharpen up my sushi knife!

Daum
 

D Larsen

TVWBB Super Fan
All,

GEEZ !!! Been over a year since I last posted ??? Oh well...haven't been grilling much at all... :(

Anyway...I love a good sharp knife...but I'm NOT a sharpening nerd, and I don't own any expensive knives...just want the ones I DO have to be sharp !!! My Brother gave me a Gatco sharpening kit a few years ago, but I never got the hang of it...fast forward to today : Based on reviews on various web sites, I bought a Worksharp Ken Onion Edition belt sander !

Man...this thing looks like I can ruin my knives quickly, but if it works as advertised, I'll be happy ! Anybody who has this model offer any general tips on using it ? Yes, I've read the Manual, and watched the included DVD, and I'll practice on old knives in the drawer...but other thoughts welcome !!!


Dean...
 

MikeCantell

TVWBB Pro
Worksharp here, start with a old knife to practice with,in a few minutes you will have pulled every drawer out in the house looking for more knifes to sharpen :)
 

Chuck L

New member
My advice is to watch some of the you tube videos on the Ken Onion Edition. Just google it.. They are much better videos than the ones on the Cd. I have only had mine about a month, but I love it so far. I also bought the attachments, and I bought my dad one last week for his birthday. He loves it also. I was at the NRA show in May, and this is what Benchmade was using to sharpen knives at their booth. I talked to the guy for quite a while and watched him sharpen several knives, and that is what convinced me to buy it. I also have the Spyderco tri-angle 204mf mentioned in other posts. I love it also , but it is very labor intensive when you are trying to sharpen a lot of knives. I have an unusually large number of knives:)
 

D Larsen

TVWBB Super Fan
Had a lot of stuff interfere with my first trial with the Ken Onion...so STILL haven't tried it !!! Sorry...

My bad...just want to be sure it has my undivided attention ! :mad:

Will report back with my early attempts with my old, dull clever...my selection for my first attempt !!!

Dean...
 

Rusty James

TVWBB Emerald Member
Bumping an older thread here, but I keep my knife edges sharp by using the bottom of a ceramic coffee mug. I have a moon stone I like much, but the mug is great for honing a quick edge.

I also keep a honing steel in the drawer too.
 

Dennis.B

TVWBB Fan
I use a Tormek T-4 and a Wicked Edge Generation 3 Pro.

The WE nowadays mostly used to expensive knifes.
With the Tormek you kan buy any cheap knife at the lokal store and make and keep it it very sharp very easy and quick.
 

Ron G.

TVWBB Wizard
I have had one of the Edge Pro Apex setups for about 5 years.

I mainly use it about once or twice a year on my primary set of nice knives or if I get one / sharpen one for a friend where the edge seems to be in rough shape.
This set takes a little time and effort, but consistently give me excellent results.

For periodic, quick touch-ups - I like a FINE or EXTRA-FINE diamond bench stone. If you take good care of your regular-use knives (mine live in a wood countertop knife block, which protects the edges), a few quick wipes on the bench stone will restore a hair-shaving edge. (I have a diamond pocket stone that I use for my pocket knives or for hobby X-acto blades, etc.)
 

Rusty James

TVWBB Emerald Member
For periodic, quick touch-ups - I like a FINE or EXTRA-FINE diamond bench stone. If you take good care of your regular-use knives (mine live in a wood countertop knife block, which protects the edges), a few quick wipes on the bench stone will restore a hair-shaving edge. (I have a diamond pocket stone that I use for my pocket knives or for hobby X-acto blades, etc.)


Is that the same product folks use to sharpen wood chisels? I must try one.
 

Ron G.

TVWBB Wizard
Something like one of these:

https://www.dmtsharp.com/sharpeners/bench-stones/dia-sharp/

The large stone will stay nice and FLAT longer than something like an Arkansas stone or standard whetstone.
Like I said - I only use mine for quick touch-ups on knives that are already sharp with decent angles, but where the edge just needs to be "freshened-up" a bit.
The diamond also cuts even very hard steel quickly
I first got hooked on them and noticed the difference on my Swiss Army pocketknife that I almost always have on me.
 
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Dennis.B

TVWBB Fan
All stones are usually excellent but It rely needs a know how to keep the angle right, even harder with a knife that have 2 sides compared to a wood chisel. Im just a rookie thats why I use grinders with holders that keeps exact the right angle on both sides.

And using digital thermometers to get my meet done right.
Pros that does 100-1000 of same meat and sharpening a year might not need it
 

Jerry N.

TVWBB Emerald Member
I did a lot of looking at sharpeners. The APEX seemed to be the slickest and best to buy, but I couldn't stomach paying over $250 for it. I also read the reviews on the clones, which were significantly less money, but ended up concluding that you get what you pay for. The biggest downfall seemed to be the cheap stones that came with the clones. In the end, I bought a 400/1000 grit whetstone for about $26 and watched a bunch of youtube videos. Found a guy named Peter Nowlan to be very helpful. Here's a link:

https://www.knifeplanet.net/how-to-sharpen-knife-on-japanese-water-stone/

I'm sure the edge I got on my first try could be better, but it is a ton better than it was. It can cut paper with ease and it slices through meat like it was new again. I didn't have to invest a ton of money or develop a new hobby, which ends up being a bunch of gadget purchasing, and I have a nice edge on my knife. I also have the hope of getting better in time.

Note, I originally bought one of the ones that America's Test Kitchen recommended (the simple pull through kind). I found that to be a piece of garbage. I don't know what I could have been doing wrong, but I wasn't getting any improvement with that thing no matter how many times I pulled the knife through it.
 

JayHeyl

TVWBB Pro
Note, I originally bought one of the ones that America's Test Kitchen recommended (the simple pull through kind). I found that to be a piece of garbage. I don't know what I could have been doing wrong, but I wasn't getting any improvement with that thing no matter how many times I pulled the knife through it.
The speed of any sharpener like that is going to depend on how close the original secondary bevel on the knife is to the angle set in the sharpener. I've sharpened knives that literally took me hours to get the initial angle set with a Lansky system. Those are fairly conventional whetstones. It would probably go faster with a diamond stone. I have some DMT diamond stones now and if I'm decreasing the angle it can still take a very long time to get the angle set. Some of that is because I don't have any very coarse stones, but a lot of it is simply the need to remove material from a very hard blade.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I steel my knives every use. About once every year or two I take the heavy use ones to the sewing center and for three,bucks a blade he trues everything up just dandy. Or if I catch my brother when he has his Water stones set up, I have him do the heavy lifting. I’ve done it myself the old fashioned way but, somehow in the various moves, I’ve lost my stones. I’ve not had much luck with any of the “pull through” style sharpeners. So, since the sewing place is right on the way home from my wife’s office, it’s not a big deal. And the guy is nice to boot!
 

 

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