Knife sharpener


 

RogerS

TVWBB All-Star
What does everyone use? And are you happy with the sharpener? I have the Guy Fieri knife set. I have a cheap manual but want to purchase electric. Need suggestions.
 

Brett Grant

TVWBB Fan
I have a Tormek and the EdgePro

Both work fabulously. For the kitchen, I would get the EdgePro. I've never used the Apex, but that would be the one that I would get. I've also got bench stones and one of the Lanskey systems. Sharpeners can be very enthusiastic about their hobbies, almost as much as BBQ'ers :) Most want more control than the "kitchen" electric sharpener gives, just like you would rather smoke something than run on down to Chilli's for ribs :) (just guessing here)

I think America's Test Kitchen did a review on sharpeners and had a model that they liked. Some people find sharpening tedious, for them it is probably best to get a steel for touchup and send their knives to a sharpener. There are lots of those to be found too.

Just my opinions.
 

Brett Grant

TVWBB Fan
It should also be said to only get an automatic one if you have traditional German/French knives.

Japanese & Ceramic knives would be a no-no. I think that Cutco would have an issue, too, but I think that you can send them to Cutco for sharpening.
 

Bob Bass

TVWBB Gold Member
RogerS...

I have the Chefs Choice model 1520. Does a fairly good effort at cleaning up both 15 and 20 degree angled blades. What it is missing is the initial cut which is necessary if your knives have been heavily used.

Have been looking at the EdgePro line for more exacting sharpening, ie better control ( lol ).
 

Pete in PG

TVWBB Pro
We bought one when we got married in the mid 80's; a chef's choice 110. They've got newer versions of that now, but it has served me well and puts a great edge on all my knives. FWIW; the
Victorinox 40520 Fibrox 8-Inch Chef's Knife is a great workhorse of a knife and a lot less $$ than others.
 

David

TVWBB Pro
We bought one when we got married in the mid 80's; a chef's choice 110. They've got newer versions of that now, but it has served me well and puts a great edge on all my knives. FWIW; the
Victorinox 40520 Fibrox 8-Inch Chef's Knife is a great workhorse of a knife and a lot less $$ than others.

Just stay with the Fibrox models.........cost a touch more, but worth it....Just ordered two more from Amazon to upgrade a couple of my older knives.............................d
 

Len Dennis

TVWBB Diamond Member
Knife brands are off topic but.......

consider Twin Master with the yellow handle. Uses a Henkell blade.and is substantially less $$.
 

Jerome D.

TVWBB All-Star
Through lots of trial and error (with an emphasis on error), I learned to do freehand sharpening on Japanese water-stones. I use a water-stone set of various brands, ranging from 200 grit (a rough stone which removes a decent amount of steel) all the way up to 16,000 grit (a fine-grit stone which puts a mirror polish on the blade edge). For me, it was well worth the time and effort to learn freehand sharpening, and it's actually become a hobby of mine.
 

Bob Bass

TVWBB Gold Member
Started years (decades ?) ago 'trying' to learn woodworking the neanderthal way - neither dust mask nor hearing protection required ;) In the process also tried my hand at freehand sharpening using a Norton waterstone set. Was finally able to get absolutely beautiful edges on the plane steels and chisels... But only when using a guide ;) Still have that set, somewhere...

I admire those that can do this type of work freehand.

Bob
 

Bob Bass

TVWBB Gold Member
Thanks Stefan B. Nice set. Still undecided as to which one, the Apex or the Pro. Either way, it will be a while before I proceed as there are some other fires to control first ;)

Bob
 

Phil Perrin

TVWBB Hall of Fame
A $5 Arkansas whet stone. I learned how to sharpen knives when I was an Army cook,and this does a good job.
 

J Reyes

TVWBB Pro
I suggest reading the online article The Edge In The Kitchen by Chad Ward he also wrote a book that can found at libraries. Chad reviews various systems in his writings.

I have used a combination of stones.

For a decent budget $20 solution with Euro quality knives a Norton Coarse/Fine India stone like the one reviewed here works. With the right techniques that stone can get a blade sharper than 90% (maybe 95%) of knives found in most kitchens.
 
I also highly recommend Chad Ward's book. Very informative and he gives excellent links to just about everything he talks about in the book.

I bought an Edge Pro Apex from a buddy of mine and can now get my knives really sharp. Prior to that I was using one of those 3 stage electrics and THOUGHT I was putting a good edge on my knives. Wrong, all I was doing was grinding them into filings. My ex now has the electric sharpener (hee-hee). I strongly recommend watching the videos on the Edge Pro site before using it.

The biggest thing to learn is obtaining and managing the burr as you sharpen.

Russ
 

J Hoke

TVWBB Pro
I use the Chefs Choice. Works fine, but my knife guy would tell you that a stone is the only true way to sharpen a knife. Mine always come out duller than when I started using a stone so that's why I use the sharpener. If I was any good with a stone I would use it.
 

Lance Wood

TVWBB Member
I bought a used Chef’s Choice 320 a few years ago off Ebay for cheap..
I love it but the other half hates it when I sharpen the knives as she
always cuts the hell outta herself even with ample warning. :rolleyes:
I’ve actually caught her trying to dull the knives so she can use them
without worrying she will lop off a body part.. :mad:

http://www.edgecraft.com/page2a.html#320
 

 

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