First Genesis 1000 project


 

Chris-CreeBQ

New member
Well this turned into a labor of love. Something about bringing back the dead that makes all the scraping and time worthwhile. I've done a lot of refurbs but this is definitely the most I've put into one. I wouldn't say that I went ALL the way to a full refurb, but its going to be an awesome grill for someone. Took an old oak door jamb from a local used building supply store and made new tables and grill handle. Also, rather than use weber hood screws, I like to use stainless 1/4 inch 20s with stainless washers and bolts. (Gives it sort of a cuff link feel.) For a real 100% restore I would use OEM hardware. Stole a wire rack for the bottom from another 1000 that I rescued as we live in the northwest and wood tables down low tend to get a lot of abuse. Really satisfying to bring back the enamel and to whomever gave the tip about razor blades, you changed my life. First time I've used that technique to clean the enamel and it blew my mind. Enjoy the before and after pics. And always open to feedback
 

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Chris-CreeBQ

New member
Fantastic job! I'm really blown away by the before pics, I'm not sure I would have the commitment to tackle that mess!!
For folks that are thinking about taking on something like this the best piece of advice I can give for that burnt on mess on the lid, using a razor blade scraper is the key. I treated it like scraping a windshield of frost. The more experienced restorers on here may already know this as old news, but the enamel is so strong that if you keep the blade flat, you will not scratch the paint. The same is true for the inside of the lid. Once youre through the bulk of the burnt on material, you can move on to the 0000 steel wool. Ive done about 20 rebuilds but this was the first I've used the razor blade approach. Game changer. Thanks for looking and good luck with your projects.
 

Chris_Arocha

New member
Yep, a razor blade is my go-to, and I was lucky to not have too much buildup to remove on my Genesis. That tool also comes in handy for spills on my stove's glass cook top, though I need to be extra cautious not to scratch it.
 

JonathanHolkum

New member
For folks that are thinking about taking on something like this the best piece of advice I can give for that burnt on mess on the lid, using a razor blade scraper is the key. I treated it like scraping a windshield of frost. The more experienced restorers on here may already know this as old news, but the enamel is so strong that if you keep the blade flat, you will not scratch the paint. The same is true for the inside of the lid. Once youre through the bulk of the burnt on material, you can move on to the 0000 steel wool. Ive done about 20 rebuilds but this was the first I've used the razor blade approach. Game changer. Thanks for looking and good luck with your projects.
I’m just beginning a restoration on a genesis 1000. Did you start with the razor blade on the outside? Can you also use 0000 on the outside of the hood to clean and polish?
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Razor blade on entire inside. Then steel wool. You can grab the razor for spots after you started with the steel wool. Same for the lid outside. But you won't need the razor for most of the outside. Then steel wool.



 

Chris-CreeBQ

New member
The one thing I would add to Bruce’s How-to is that of the grill I’m starting with is really far gone in terms of grease, I just start with the razor. That’s just my preference as I think it saves time - but elbow grease and steel wool are fail safe at any point in the process. In terms of the razor, I use a paint removal tool that holds the blade. For any detail work around bolts or in bends I typically remove the blade and just hold it directly. Changing blades often and flipping sides of the blade will help it scrape more thoroughly on each pass. Good luck!
 

JonathanHolkum

New member
Thanks for the tips, I started with a wire brush on the grill base and lid end caps. I’ll create a post with the original condition pictures eventually now that I’ve gotten started. I’m happy I stumbled along this forum!
 

 

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