Carryover cooking, holding, and doneness of brisket

Lynn Dollar

TVWBB All-Star
From my 2002 article Holding, Storing & Reheating Barbecued Meats:

To keep meat warm even longer, preheat the cooler first. Here are several ideas on how to do this:

  • Pour a gallon of hot tap water into the cooler. Close the lid and slosh the water around. Allow the water to heat the interior for several minutes, then discard the water and dry thoroughly.
  • Wrap several fireplace bricks in heavy duty aluminum foil. Heat in a 500°F oven for 30 minutes. Place a thick layer of dry towels in the bottom of the cooler, then add the hot bricks, then a thin layer of moist towels. This method was described by Alton Brown on an episode of “Good Eats.”
  • Place an electric heating pad inside the cooler. This method was described by Big Al in a post on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.
  • Turn the cooler upside down over a heater vent. This method was described by Keri C. in a post on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.
This article pre-dates the peach butcher paper trend and the idea that you should bring a brisket's temp down before placing it in the cooler...something I need to update.
First lesson, never over look the resources of this site :)
 

Lew Newby

TVWBB All-Star
Brian, I've found there's more latitude in holding temp. than it sounds. Years ago the guidance was double wrap in HD foil, put it into a cooler with towels around the wrapped Brisket and slice it when you're ready to eat. I have pulled Brisket at 205 internal temp, immediately wrapped in foil and into the cooler. 4+ hours later I took it into the kitchen, sliced it, and my son-in-law thought it was great and he knows food. It was very moist, great flavor, and passed the pull test. The bark was a little soft but no one noticed. Once you cook it right there's considerable latitude and I favor the long rest time. You'll do fine.
 

MartinB

TVWBB Pro
Ive had good results from just cooling on counter (wrapped) for 45 min, to holding in cooler 8 hrs w/towels.
All been pretty good.

I think carryover concept is deceptive.
Yes, theres a few degree temperature rise in a 135F beef roast cooked in 350F oven, after its taken out and placed on counter. Maybe 5F even.

What happens for a 200F meat cooked in 250F smoker is not as pronounced . It cools much more rapidly at room temp. The temperature driving force to conduct heat to inside is minimal, and rapidly goes away as it quickly cools frim outside. By the time i can just wrap it and get back on smoker at 170F the temp is dropping internally. Meat continues to breakdown some after taken off for sure...its hot....but it doesnt get measureably hotter inside in my experience...it starts falling fast.

But it all depends on temperature and humidity you hold it at. Higher temp, higher humidity, the slower it cools, and the more possible internal temp rise it might have. If you put it on counter, i dont think its anything to worry about.
 
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J Hasselberger

TVWBB Pro
I think carryover concept is deceptive.
Yes, theres a few degree temperature rise in a 135F beef roast cooked in 350F oven, after its taken out and placed on counter. Maybe 5F even.

What happens for a 200F meat cooked in 250F smoker is not as pronounced . It cools much more rapidly at room temp. The temperature driving force to conduct heat to inside is minimal, and rapidly goes away as it quickly cools frim outside. By the time i can just wrap it and get back on smoker at 170F the temp is dropping internally. Meat continues to breakdown some after taken off for sure...its hot....but it doesnt get measureably hotter inside in my experience...it starts falling fast.

But it all depends on temperature and humidity you hold it at. Higher temp, higher humidity, the slower it cools, and the more possible internal temp rise it might have. If you put it on counter, i dont think its anything to worry about.
That makes a lot of sense, Martin. I have cooled briskets to 170° then wrapped them in a cooler for 4 or 5 hours and have been surprised at how hot they still are. Using foil to wrap, there is very little liquid pooled in the foil. I think there's something to the idea that moisture gets re-absorbed.

Jeff
 

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