Brisket question


 

LinBerl

TVWBB Member
I've got a 14" wsm. My butcher had a 4 lb grassfed brisket so I bought it. I've done everything but a brisket in my little wsm. I can't seem to find any info on whether such a small piece would be better low n slow or high heat. And I can't find anything that tells me approximately how long per pound, either. I cook over royal oak chunks, and find the wsm heats faster than the bigger units. I have a temp gauge I can put in the meat, and I have one at the grill level.

Anyone able to tell me times and/or temps to watch for in either method? I would prefer to not go over 6 hours so if that means no slow cooking, that's okay. What would help is to know (1) the temp to foil, and temps to remove it, or (2) how long to cook at 325+.

It was not a cheap cut of meat so I really don't want to screw it up (that's why I haven't done a brisket before, they are very pricey).
Thanks!!!!
 

J Hasselberger

TVWBB Pro
If it's 4 lbs (trimmed), I believe that would make it a portion of a flat. Since you have experience with a 14.5 (I don't), I would let that be your guide. For example, a brisket flat will be thinner than a pork shoulder, so it will take less time to cook. Just guessing, but I'd call for 5-6 hours at 250. In any case, you should cook to tenderness and not to temperature, although done temp for a brisket is somewhere between 190-205, depending on the particular cut. Most folks foil at the stall (155-170) and/or when the bark looks nice to them. It's done when a probe goes into the meat with almost no resistance.
 

Van DeWald

TVWBB Fan
I would cook it like anything else. Bring your 14.5 up to temp, and put on the meat. Rule of thumb says 1 1/2 hours per pound. Monitor your temps. You can foil at around 165 internal, and take it to about 200, then probe for tenderness.
 

Charles H.

TVWBB Super Fan
I would cook it low and slow, seasoned with SPOG.
Monitor internal temperature with a thermometer.
Start checking for tenderness around 190.
When the probe goes in nice and easy it's ready.
Should turn out great.
 

Mike Cout

TVWBB Member
It's all about the thickness of the piece of meat... With that said, the 1-1/5 hours/lb should still hold true to that. But as the others said, I'd start probing for tenderness at the 190 mark.
 

jfortson

TVWBB Fan
Never cooked one that small, but I would think low and slow and already suggested. A high heat cook on a piece that small may cook too fast for the fat to render. 225 would be safe and 300 would be a gamble, so go with what is safe.
 

LinBerl

TVWBB Member
Thanks for all the advice. The brisket turned out really good imo. The only issue is that it was not equal height, there was a big hump on one end. so i had to cook it where it was probe tender on the narrower part and a little under on the big part to avoid overcooking the smaller area. It took 7 hours with the smoker between 225 and 275 throughout. I pulled it at 180 degrees because of the difference in the depth of the meat and not wanting the grassfed to be too dry. I did not foil and the bark was amazing! The meat we ate last night was from the narrower end and was butter tender but juicy. Tonight it will be from the thicker part and I will heat it up in a low oven with some sauce; i will slice as thin as possible. I just don't know what to do when the parts don't cook evenly,,,???
 

Dustin Dorsey

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Sounds like you nailed it! Foil usually helps cook more evenly but I'm not a fan either. You'll never find them even. You're might have had some point meat still on one end. I don't know. I would try to maybe orient the meat such that the thick end would get hit by the air flow. It makes a lot more sense with an offset maybe you can pay attention to where the top vent is and orient it that way? I usually just don't worry about it. Just make sure it all probes tender. I have no experience with grass fed and finished but it seems like it would be similar. Flats are pretty lean.
 

J Hasselberger

TVWBB Pro
i will slice as thin as possible. I just don't know what to do when the parts don't cook evenly,,,???

Here's what I do with leftover flat. Your live will change.
Slice it about 1/2" thick and break/shred it apart into a saucepan with about a tablespoon of beef broth. Heat it over low (don't cook it -- just warm it) and smash it apart even more. Add a little of your favorite barbecue sauce. Meanwhile, grill a beef sausage. Lightly toast a large burger roll. lay some pickles down on the open roll, slap on the brisket, cut a piece of sausage lengthwise and butterfly it on top, add some slaw and close the bun. Sit down with an ice cold beer and prepare to be transported.
 

DaveW

TVWBB Wizard
It's all about the thickness of the piece of meat... With that said, the 1-1/5 hours/lb should still hold true to that. But as the others said, I'd start probing for tenderness at the 190 mark.


yes, yes, yes. Cook times are determined by thickness, not by weight. It works as a general rule of thumb for whole cuts as the weight is proportional to the thickness. I.e. a 10lb whole packer will be thinner than a 15lb whole packer. A 4lb partial flat that is approximately 1.5 inches thick will take the same amount of time to cook as an 8lb full flat that is also 1.5 inches thick.
 

 

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