Whole packer corned Brisket

S.Six

TVWBB All-Star
Was at my local Shamrock foods store and saw full packer corned beef briskets and had to have one!😊

Used the little seasoning packet that came with it and added a rub of my own.

On the 22.5"wsm she went. I removed the water pan and was gunning for 325-350° for the cook. I didn't add any smoke wood to it as I didn't want to have a pastrami flavor to it. The wsm ran like a champ through out the cook.

At about 2.5hrs it was at 160°IT. I removed it and foiled.

At about 4hrs 40mins it was done! Let it rest about 2.5hrs till dinner.

Turned out awesome! Very pleased with the results and ease of the cook. Will definitely do this again!
Thanks for looking, see you next cook!
 

Jason Paul

TVWBB Member
That looks great!

So, still being new to smoking, what is the difference (end product) between this and a traditional brisket? I see here you've cooked at a higher temperature for a shorter time. So, 325-350 for about 5 hours, vs. a traditional brisket at 225 or so for 10-12 hours or more - though I've also seen references here to high-heat brisket.

Is the difference mainly in the seasoning (corned beef vs. salt & pepper, Texas-style brisket), or is the meat less tender (not fall-apart) - more for thin slices, or something else?

Just trying to get an idea of how the end products differ.

Thanks,
Jason
 

BrianCal

TVWBB Pro
I am also curious about the hot and fast method instead of low and slow, as well as what IT you ended up at. You mention 160 degrees but I wasn't sure if that was the final temp or just when you foiled it.

also, any other advice, I got one of these from my brother in law. At least I think I did, he gave it to my mother in law who gave it to me, and they "think" it is a corned beef brisket, but there's no label on it. But the good news is that it comes form one of NYC's best meat purveyors (supplier to Peter Luger), so quality is always outstanding

Thinking of using those same seasonings, maybe add a few for some additional flavor, maybe even a little injection? also, pretty big difference in thickness between the flat and the point, any different technique on this kind compared to a regular brisket ?
 

S.Six

TVWBB All-Star
That looks great!

So, still being new to smoking, what is the difference (end product) between this and a traditional brisket? I see here you've cooked at a higher temperature for a shorter time. So, 325-350 for about 5 hours, vs. a traditional brisket at 225 or so for 10-12 hours or more - though I've also seen references here to high-heat brisket.

Is the difference mainly in the seasoning (corned beef vs. salt & pepper, Texas-style brisket), or is the meat less tender (not fall-apart) - more for thin slices, or something else?

Just trying to get an idea of how the end products differ.

Thanks,
Jason

Well this was a "corned " beef brisket which has been cured. A regular brisket is more your traditional bbq. HH is a great way to do a corned beef, as I like less of a bbq flavor on corned beef( as I didn't use any smoke too) . But for a Texas style brisket I prefer low-n-slow, that way you get more smoke flavor. HH brisket just doesn't have the same flavor. That being said, don't be shy to try it both ways. Part of the fun off bbq is experimenting.
 

S.Six

TVWBB All-Star
I am also curious about the hot and fast method instead of low and slow, as well as what IT you ended up at. You mention 160 degrees but I wasn't sure if that was the final temp or just when you foiled it.

also, any other advice, I got one of these from my brother in law. At least I think I did, he gave it to my mother in law who gave it to me, and they "think" it is a corned beef brisket, but there's no label on it. But the good news is that it comes form one of NYC's best meat purveyors (supplier to Peter Luger), so quality is always outstanding

Thinking of using those same seasonings, maybe add a few for some additional flavor, maybe even a little injection? also, pretty big difference in thickness between the flat and the point, any different technique on this kind compared to a regular brisket ?

160° is when I foiled it. I pulled it around 205° as that is when it felt tender. For a corned beef I would not inject it myself, its got a lot of flavor in it already. I used the same technique that you would for a regular brisket (just didn't add any smoke wood )
 

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