Looking For A New Dog


 

Bob H.

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Looking For a nice Dog. My pal of 12 years, Barney was a Yellow Lab, and a best buddy.
My consideration in choosing another will be compatibility with my seven grandkids, the
oldest is 8 years old. I like Goldens as well. Most likely another dog from a shelter again.
Does anyone have any other suggestions? Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
 

GrantT

TVWBB Super Fan
There is a reason that service dog training companies primarily use Goldens, Yellow Labs (and possibly some "oodle" mixed in). These dogs are instinctively and genetically "gentle" protective, as opposed to "defensive" protective. Also filled with their famous infinite love for their pack.
 
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Ryan Burke

TVWBB Fan
Bob, So sorry to hear about your loss. I have always gotten a dog from a shelter and have always gotten a lab mix. The thing about a dog is as long as you take care of it they will be 100% loyal to you. To the issue with your grandchildren let the dog take time to adjust to them. Have them play with the dog, give him treats, give the dog his dinner and they will be best friends. My current dog was not that fond of my son when we first got him. Never worried about him biting or anything like that. After a couple weeks where my son would walk him and give him his dinner they were best friends. My boy Tucker is getting up there in age but a fantastic companion. He only cost $45.
 

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Mark Foreman

TVWBB All-Star
Our 1 1/2 year old Corgis came from a breeder. We wanted to adopt but there were no puppies available. Turned out to be a wonderful experience. I hope your search turns out fun as ours was.
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Rich Dahl

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
There are a lot of rescue groups out there and what Ryan said is a good way to go. You will get the insight of the foster parent's as to the disposition of the pup, it's likes and dislikes. How it reacts to a home environment instead of a stressed out pup in a cage at the shelter. My wife and I have fostered a few pups in our life's and all but one of our dogs and there have been many wasn't a rescue.
Most of our rescues were goldens. Our current one is a golden/husky/coyote mix, and she is the sweetest pup we've ever had, and her companion is a black lab our only non rescue in forty years. She was gifted to us for helping a young couple who had two labs and worked a lot of long hours so we would walk down to their house and let the pups out a couple times a day. The wife's mother raised labs in Michigan and brought one of her pups out when they came to visit the kids as a gift for helping the kids out.

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RichPB (richlife)

TVWBB All-Star
Good luck in your quest, Bob. Good advice especially about a fostered dog. May cost a little more, but worth the safety factor.

One of my worst ever experiences was having to put down a wonderful Malamute girl I had volunteered to rescue because she was a potential danger to my young grandson. Both her breeder (I also had her brother) and our Malamute rescue group warned me to do it. Such a shame as we got along fabulously. Still hurts terribly today. But as you know, we don't take chances with our kids.
 

Ryan Ahearn

New member
There is a reason that service dog training companies primarily use Goldens, Yellow Labs (and possibly some "oodle" mixed in). These dogs are instinctively and genetically "gentle" protective, as opposed to "defensive" protective. Also filled with their famous infinite love for their pack.
Now that I think about it I knew a guy who got his dog from a guide dog adoption program. All of the dogs were labs. The adoption program was something along the lines of if after two years of training the dog didn’t meet the guide dog requirements they are adopted out. I don’t know what the requirements are but his dog was a beautiful well behaved yellow lab.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Sister and BIL just had to put their absolutely wonderful Rottie down. She was the happiest dog I think I've ever seen. Playful and just wonderful with little ones. Only dog my grandson wasn't afraid of yet big enough to literally eat him. Sad.
 

Jason Godard

TVWBB Pro
As much as I like the idea of rescuing a dog, especially with your requirement regarding little kids, I can’t suggest that. So many wonderful dogs at shelters but they have history, improper training and sometimes outright abuse which will lead to the aggression that you are clearly wanting to avoid. I would recommend a purebred golden retriever all the way. Of the 4 dogs I’ve had, she was by far the best. Outside of teething as a puppy, I never worried about her biting anyone, ever. Not once. Kids, neighbors, inside or outside, even a stranger coming in the house. She would bark at the doorbell something fierce, but once the door opened, she was all tail wags and smiles. Was she a good guard dog? No. But I don’t need a dog for protection, I need a dog that doesn’t bite. She was the best dog I ever raised, always wanting to please. Good luck.
 
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Rich Dahl

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I agree with Jason we've had six purebred goldens and all of them were just as Jason described. Another bred is labs, Abby our black lab has the deepest loudest bark I've ever heard from a dog her size. But friend or stranger, kids or adults she is all giggles and wiggles when you open the door. Absolutely loves everyone.
 

RichPB (richlife)

TVWBB All-Star
For children, the ideal is raising a dog from a puppy (with attendant development problems), but an older dog with a known past and one previous owner can be just fine. The big concern would be adopting a dog with unknown background. Many adopted dogs can be perfect angels for the first several months or longer, but a bad history can begin to show in strange ways once they are used to their new environment and begin to assert themselves. This is a concern for anyone, but more so with children. An adult environment is less concerning as long as the new owners are aware of the potential difficulties and are prepared to work with them.

Our current dog, Tonto, was supposed to be from a known background and we adopted with no concern. Sadly, it appears someone wasn't fully forthcoming. Tonto is wonderful dog, not vicious or aggressive, but clearly has issues which the previous owner could not have been ignorant of. He is ours and we love him and just hope the right environment and handling will eventually allow him to overcome his issues. (What issues? Try to picture a really nice dog with autism or possibly brain damage that was NOT a trait in his early years. Sometimes he acts perfectly normal, at other times (pretty much starting each day) it's like a switch was thrown and we have a fearful, anxious dog totally lacking in trust. Quite difficult for us and very sad. But there is no way we are giving him up.)

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Russ in CFL

TVWBB Fan
Sorry to hear about your loss. Definitely find a good rescue. They never stop repaying you back. I'll never forget the day we brought our now 8 year old boxer rescue home. We opened the door and she just ran in circles full speed in the yard until she tripped over her own paws. That moment of watching her run was amazing!

She was terrified of men when we first got her probably because of the previous owner but great with women and kids. She would even cower down if I stood up too fast. Of course now she just owns the place and anywhere we go.

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Mark Foreman

TVWBB All-Star
For children, the ideal is raising a dog from a puppy (with attendant development problems), but an older dog with a known past and one previous owner can be just fine. The big concern would be adopting a dog with unknown background. Many adopted dogs can be perfect angels for the first several months or longer, but a bad history can begin to show in strange ways once they are used to their new environment and begin to assert themselves. This is a concern for anyone, but more so with children. An adult environment is less concerning as long as the new owners are aware of the potential difficulties and are prepared to work with them.

Our current dog, Tonto, was supposed to be from a known background and we adopted with no concern. Sadly, it appears someone wasn't fully forthcoming. Tonto is wonderful dog, not vicious or aggressive, but clearly has issues which the previous owner could not have been ignorant of. He is ours and we love him and just hope the right environment and handling will eventually allow him to overcome his issues. (What issues? Try to picture a really nice dog with autism or possibly brain damage that was NOT a trait in his early years. Sometimes he acts perfectly normal, at other times (pretty much starting each day) it's like a switch was thrown and we have a fearful, anxious dog totally lacking in trust. Quite difficult for us and very sad. But there is no way we are giving him up.)

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We got two rescue dogs when the 4 of “them (teenagers)“ Who were still living at home. I had a great time raising the doggos (my daughters term). But … I did do patrol, baths, feeding, walking, outings, etc. LOL
 
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Mark Foreman

TVWBB All-Star
Sorry to hear about your loss. Definitely find a good rescue. They never stop repaying you back. I'll never forget the day we brought our now 8 year old boxer rescue home. We opened the door and she just ran in circles full speed in the yard until she tripped over her own paws. That moment of watching her run was amazing!

She was terrified of men when we first got her probably because of the previous owner but great with women and kids. She would even cower down if I stood up too fast. Of course now she just owns the place and anywhere we go.

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Aw come on… you know he wants to drive. Fire that puppy up.

BTW, nice looking dog. Boxer mix? I ask cause one of our rescues was Ridgeback boxer cross…. Strongest dog I’ve ever known.

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Russ in CFL

TVWBB Fan
She is a mix. According to the boxer rescue she was full boxer but we didn't buy that. We aren't 100% sure what the mix is but feel there is some lab possibly. Funny ours has that same duck toy and loves it.

Love the look of your pup!
 

Mark Foreman

TVWBB All-Star
To be honest, she was the most obedient, loving, affectionate dog but being NOT NOT NOT the yellow crayon in the box made for some really fum]n times. I miss her more than I could ever say.
 

Steve Petrone

TVWBB Diamond Member
This week 2000 beagles were rescued. 20 came to Knoxville. They look like terrific hounds. Maybe some came to a rescue near you.
 

 

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