HOW TO: Remove Cook Box Slide Rail Screws - The Easy Way

Jon Tofte

TVWBB Hall of Fame
My Dewalt one looks like the one you posted Bruce except mine is a little older and has only one LED light rather than the fancy three light “ring.” I guess I need to practice more with using it very gently because I didn’t think mine could ratchet while the bolt/screw was not moving.

I will experiment some and let you know what I learn.
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
It took me a long time to figure out how to use one correctly and what they're best used for
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB All-Star
I will probably grab a Rigid impact driver. Or probably put it on my Christmas list. Hopefully I can catch a good Sale on it in the next few weeks.
The Ridgid impact driver I have has twice the torque of your Craftsman, and it's not the latest brushless variety. Be careful what you wish for.
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB All-Star
Jon, my experience is that the screwhead rounds off well before the screw breaks, especially if the screwhead is rusty. I think Jeff MA has the right technique...a liberal application of heat is required.
 

BillSmith

TVWBB Pro
I did not use any hear or solvent sprays prior to removing these screws.

I think you can edit your original post. If so, can you change “hear” to “heat”?

Thanks for the video, for the few screws that you can’t remove, your only option is to drill them out, right?
 

LMichaels

TVWBB Olympian
My experience with the brushless tools is low speed control is very sketchy. I have the 1/2" drive Bosch 18V and it has enough power to rip a lug nut to shreds but the trigger on these brushless designs does not respond well. If you pull slightly it does not respond. Pull harder and it finally takes off and then you can slow it down. I have a brushless battery operated string trimmer as well. One of the high power (60V or 80V can't remember which) and it too behaves the same way. So while the brushless tools have the potential for better battery life, and more ultimate torque/power lower speed control still favors good old brush style motors.
 

Mike Tee

TVWBB Fan
My experience with the brushless tools is low speed control is very sketchy. I have the 1/2" drive Bosch 18V and it has enough power to rip a lug nut to shreds but the trigger on these brushless designs does not respond well. If you pull slightly it does not respond. Pull harder and it finally takes off and then you can slow it down. I have a brushless battery operated string trimmer as well. One of the high power (60V or 80V can't remember which) and it too behaves the same way. So while the brushless tools have the potential for better battery life, and more ultimate torque/power lower speed control still favors good old brush style motors.
I have no basis for comparison, as I only own one - but I have a brushless Milwaukee m18 impact driver, and can get slow speeds with low pressure. I used this technique in the spring. In hindsight I could have bought m12, but got advice from a pro, and got a ridiculously low price.
 

timothy

TVWBB Olympian
I have both a Bosch and a Dewalt 20v impact drivers. Both have an adjustable torque switch. 1 (low), 2 (med), 3 (high).
The trigger is variable speed.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB Olympian
Can you post photos? I have never seen an actual impact driver with a torque adjustment other than how had you pull the trigger. If such a thing truly exists I might be able to make use of such an animal
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Larry, This video explains the system on the Rigid Octane drill driver. The one guy is super annoying in the video and it is too long, but it will give you and idea.
'
 

timothy

TVWBB Olympian
Can you post photos? I have never seen an actual impact driver with a torque adjustment other than how had you pull the trigger. If such a thing truly exists I might be able to make use of such an animal
 

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timothy

TVWBB Olympian
I think it is actually RPM, not torque...I would love to find an impact tool with variable torque.

View attachment 18255
Yea, that could be but I used the same at work and that switch controls the amount of impacts per second.( so I call that torgue)
1 goes really slow. Good for fine/small screws
2 is a little faster. Good for medium screws
3 is normal. Good for framing screws/tapcons.
It works basically the same way as drill with an adjustable clutch for driving screws.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB Olympian
So is it a variable speed trigger? Maybe if so the switch simply puts a limit as to how much energy is applied to the motor. The video is garbage from those guys. From the sound of the motors it's simply a voltage limiter switch. It also explains why it's down at the battery area.
 

timothy

TVWBB Olympian
So is it a variable speed trigger? Maybe if so the switch simply puts a limit as to how much energy is applied to the motor
It has a variable speed trigger, but 1, 2 or 3 also limits the RPM's and the BPM's.
1 only goes low RPM's no matter how hard you squeeze the trigger but it also does low BPM's or beat per minute, and that's the torgue I was talking about.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB Olympian
It has a variable speed trigger, but 1, 2 or 3 also limits the RPM's and the BPM's.
1 only goes low RPM's no matter how hard you squeeze the trigger but it also does low BPM's or beat per minute, and that's the torgue I was talking about.
Right, it's basically a voltage limiter. Like an electrical governor if you will. The lower the volts the lower the speed and the lower the BPM which equates to less torque applied. If you have ever used an air impact they do the same thing by using a flow control device. Only allowing so much air flow no matter how hard to pull the trigger. Here is a photo of the back of the exact same 3/8" air impact I own (much more beat up than mine but same wrench. Notice too the air control only operates on forward speeds
1606000006125.png
 

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