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Help finding grates


 

Roy-Parallax

TVWBB Pro
Here's another grate question. I apologize if it's already been answered. So much information coming at me so fast, it's hard to take everything in and hold it.

Was it ever possible to get Genesis cast iron grates without an enamel finish? One of the fellas has generously offered to send me an old set for just the cost of mailing but I'd only want them if they were straight up cast iron. Not interested in having to be concerned about getting porcelain enamel in my family's food. Now, if they are straight cast iron, then it's totally different. I imagine I may prefer them to stainless, even though I'm sure they'll be harder to clean and care for.
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Yah, it is pretty tough in areas with humidity and rain when you have to keep your grills outside. Even with a cover, the moisture gets to those grates. You need to be very proactive and meticulous about cleaning and oiling them after every cook.
 

Jon Tofte

TVWBB Olympian
It is my opinion that the first cast iron grates Weber offered on the Genesis were not coated. They are really nice, but as Larry notes a pain - well a lot of work to keep up.

30E0CA71-F3B2-4208-B752-9DA932DD8C8F.jpeg

The ones I am referring to have a patent engraved on the flat side.

I still love these old grates (even though I don’t like the later porcelain-plated ones). If not badly rusted out, they can be wire brushed to like new like I did with these:

22AD92CE-6575-48B8-8975-FA1C42ED1E67.jpeg
 

Roy-Parallax

TVWBB Pro
It is my opinion that the first cast iron grates Weber offered on the Genesis were not coated. They are really nice, but as Larry notes a pain - well a lot of work to keep up.

View attachment 44943

The ones I am referring to have a patent engraved on the flat side.

I still love these old grates (even though I don’t like the later porcelain-plated ones). If not badly rusted out, they can be wire brushed to like new like I did with these:

View attachment 44944
Lovely. How much work are they to maintain?
 

Roy-Parallax

TVWBB Pro
It is my opinion that the first cast iron grates Weber offered on the Genesis were not coated. They are really nice, but as Larry notes a pain - well a lot of work to keep up.

View attachment 44943

The ones I am referring to have a patent engraved on the flat side.

I still love these old grates (even though I don’t like the later porcelain-plated ones). If not badly rusted out, they can be wire brushed to like new like I did with these:

View attachment 44944
Jon, do you know what years Weber still made cast iron grates without the enamel finish?
 

Jon Tofte

TVWBB Olympian
Roy,
I am not really sure but would guess from the late 80s to early 90s. You can tell by looking when they switched to the thick, smooth porcelain plating that always started peeling off onto your food😫. More recently, Weber cast iron is not nearly as thick, but they use a matte coating that is less susceptible, I think, to chipping off.

The early ones are the best, but to answer your question, they can be a LOT of work. If you let them sit unused too long or burn off too much seasoning, the rust will start appearing. I oil mine frequently and take them inside on the winter if I am not using them.
 

Roy-Parallax

TVWBB Pro
Roy,
I am not really sure but would guess from the late 80s to early 90s. You can tell by looking when they switched to the thick, smooth porcelain plating that always started peeling off onto your food😫. More recently, Weber cast iron is not nearly as thick, but they use a matte coating that is less susceptible, I think, to chipping off.

The early ones are the best, but to answer your question, they can be a LOT of work. If you let them sit unused too long or burn off too much seasoning, the rust will start appearing. I oil mine frequently and take them inside on the winter if I am not using them.
I hear you, Jon. I'd like to give 'em a try but I recognize they may wind up not working for me. I have a second grill coming online soon and it will need grates of some sort. So hopefully either the old CI or a really thick 9mm stainless (from a Summit since Dave's out of commission for the moment).
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I find that the newer "matt" or lightly porcelain coated grates still rust out and when they do, they tend to rust in flakes rather than just overall. I have had it happen on several Q grills. You still have the problem of getting one of those "flakes" in your food.
I think if you are going with CI grates, you should really try for some uncoated grates.
 

Roy-Parallax

TVWBB Pro
I find that the newer "matt" or lightly porcelain coated grates still rust out and when they do, they tend to rust in flakes rather than just overall. I have had it happen on several Q grills. You still have the problem of getting one of those "flakes" in your food.
I think if you are going with CI grates, you should really try for some uncoated grates.
Any recommendations for uncoated grates, Bruce, or anyone else? Finding the old Weber ones may be tough.
 

Roy-Parallax

TVWBB Pro
Yet another reason for sticking with stainless steel grates, you don't have to worry about eating rust.
I'm more concerned about flakes of enamel than rust. But as I look online and research this, I'm rethinking my notions about cast iron. They cook wonderfully but the amount of care required looks onerous, particularly here in western Washington state where it rains so much. If I still lived in Tucson, I'd definitely give them a whirl.
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Amazon has some uncoated CI grates, I beleieve. But I don't deal with them so I am not sure which ones. I would do a search on amazon.
 

Roy-Parallax

TVWBB Pro
I don't know enough to discern which ones are worthwhile. No worries. I'm letting go of cast iron for now. As impractical for this climate. If a set turns up, I may reevaluate.
 

 

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