Country Style Ribs


 

Mark Ritter

TVWBB Member
Country Style Ribs, grilled sweet corn, grilled sourdough bread with herbed butter, and coleslaw.
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Jim Lampe

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Beautiful Colour On That Pork Mark!
Excellent Cookin' man!
I Can Taste It Half Way Cross The Country!
 

Mark Ritter

TVWBB Member
Thanks for all the nice compliments, everyone. Cooking it and photographing it was a lot of fun. Of course, the best part was eating it. Still some leftovers for dinner tonight. Yippie!
 

Bob Sample

TVWBB Diamond Member
Leftovers? Don't say that to loud around Mr Lampe, I don't think he believes in leftovers. That pork looks very tasty.
 

Len Dennis

TVWBB Diamond Member
Ribs?

Not to take away from your cook (still looks fantastic) but they look like butt chops to me (first pic--can't see through the sauce in subsequent pics tho).
 

Mark Ritter

TVWBB Member
Around here, in central Pennsylvania, they are called country style ribs. I know they go by other names in other places. Here's a definition I found online.

"What Are Country Style Ribs?
Cut from the blade end of the pork loin, next to the shoulder, these ribs contain a lot of fat, and may or may not contain bone. They are not the easiest eating type of rib for eating with the fingers because of the placement of the fat throughout the meat and the shape of the bone. But they are tasty.

When barbecued, the high fat content of these beauties keeps the meat moist and tender, and adds a lot of great flavor. They can be grilled over low, direct heat, or slow barbecued using the indirect grilling method. When the internal temperature reaches 165F, they're done, but they can be cooked longer for more tender eating. When they reach 180-190F they'll be falling apart."
 

 

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