Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Slice them into thin strips and make satay! I don’t skewer them anymore, just lay them out and get a nice char and then you’re ready to dip in a nice peanut sauce and enjoy them with some jasmine rice and pickled cucumber salad! That’s the best way I have grilled them!
 

Bill Hall

TVWBB Fan
Seared them up and let them cook for 20 mins indirect did the trick. I couldn’t really tell a difference between searing first or last. I think the brine helped keep them moist.F8A728E0-D235-4E95-BF16-4AE16049F72A.jpegE37F9028-0900-43AD-B5CE-92BCDE50F684.jpeg5BBCF235-A873-42E1-84F6-6B7A310A2E21.jpeg75EF38BC-A748-4B4C-854B-E8F3BD5368F5.jpeg
 

Bruno

TVWBB All-Star
Slice them into thin strips and make satay! I don’t skewer them anymore, just lay them out and get a nice char and then you’re ready to dip in a nice peanut sauce and enjoy them with some jasmine rice and pickled cucumber salad! That’s the best way I have grilled them!
Sounds delicious, just like a dish we have at our favorite Thai spot. If you have any recipes for the chicken, sauce and cucumbers I would really appreciate it. Thanks
 

Jerry N.

TVWBB Emerald Member
One thing I do that is easier than pounding them or butterflying them is just to cut them across the breast. That yields a slim piece and a fatter piece from each half breast. Then I just take the thinner pieces off a bit earlier. That way the thin end isn’t over cooked - easy.

I do agree that a higher heat works best, but not too high. I cook mine at around 350 degrees and temp them after about 15 minutes to make sure I pull them at anything over 160. The carry over heat plus the resting time at that temp yields a safe piece of chicken that’s not over cooked.

The other thing I do is buy good chicken. Sounds crazy, but we eat a lot of BSCB and I got really tired of the rubbery chicken. So I stepped up to a higher end supplier (Bell and Evens or Miller’s Amish) and am much more satisfied. I’m guessing those are local or regional, but the point is, look for some better meat. Unfortunately, the price per pound will shock you, but it’s just me and DW and our food budget is not a concern.

Of course I have a splurge meat and that’s a great steak (Costco prime beef), but that’s a completely different thread. :D(y)
 

Brad Olson

TVWBB Guru
Under normal conditions, last night I would've been out in Iowa and eating gas-grilled turkey breast tenders with a group of college friends. But since conditions are decidedly not normal and I'm safer at home, I cut up some BSCBs and marinated them in Italian dressing (a 15 oz. bottle of Wish-Bone Robusto with a packet of dry Good Seasons Zesty Italian, salt and pepper stirred in) for 8 hours before grilling them over charcoal. The ID marinade is simple, easy and effective.
 
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Bruno

TVWBB All-Star
I cook mine following Sam the Cooking Guy's recipes...


I really like the Jalapeno one only because I like spicy food, can't go wrong either way though. I'm going to try this one from him pretty soon though...

I have to remember to pound my chicken, makes way too much sense. Thanks for posting those.
 
Sam Bee, thanks for the tip on Sam the Cooking Guy.

I was not familiar with him, but I've now watched several of his videos.

Grill Grates for the Genesis are due in tomorrow, and I'm gonna try some of those chicken recipes to break them in.
 

Dick Buchanan

New member
I smoke no skin no bone chicken breasts frequently. Personally, I think meat and poultry are better with the bone. And am in the Homer Simpson school of "extra skin," but everyone else in my family insists on boneless, skinless so that's what we have. I love Bryan S.'s "Roadside Chicken" recipe and it has been always been a big hit with both family and friends for years. Requires a few hours of marinating and frequent basting. Sear over coals and then move to indirect. If you don't have luck with reverse searing I'm pretty sure they'll look and taste great cooked indirect the whole time. Always tender and juicy, great taste.
 

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