Two day brisket, from Steven Raichlen's site


 

Lynn Dollar

TVWBB Gold Member
They broke the cook into a second day, by cooking to 165* and then putting it in the fridge over night .

Me, I don't have any trouble getting up early, in fact, I enjoy watching the sun come up from the patio. And its really quiet without the normal city sounds except there's always some guy going through the gears on motorcycle with the throttle flat out, I would guess , because there's no one on the streets. Being a fisherman most of my life, getting up early is a good thing.

Also, on Day 2 of their cook, I would've just put the brisket in the oven rather than back on the BGE without wood chunks.

How to Smoke and Serve a Whole Brisket in One Day Without Rising at the Crack of Dawn

 

Chuck-roaniecowpony

TVWBB Super Fan
Interesting approach. There have been questions about this in the past on some forums.

This is one reason I bought a pellet pooper. I start it the night before, toss in a smoke tube, and let it run low and slow.
 

J Hasselberger

TVWBB Pro
The Salt Lick out here in Driftwood, Texas does this. Their distinctive "open pit" isn't really cooking the meat, just reheating it while the pitmaster mops it to get a nice spicy bark. The Lick is huge (there is parking for 1,000 cars) and they do up to a couple of hundred briskets in a weekend. They have a big smoking operation going on where they smoke the meats to a certain temp then wrap them hot in heavy plastic wrap and put them in the fridge. They get pulled as needed to keep pace with the diners. I believe it takes about an hour or so for a brisket to move from the load-in side of the pit to the serving side.

The brisket is consistently ok. The pork ribs are pretty good. The turkey and sausage are excellent.

The-Salt-Lick-BBQ-open-pit by Jeff Hasselberger, on Flickr
 

Chuck-roaniecowpony

TVWBB Super Fan
The Salt Lick out here in Driftwood, Texas does this. Their distinctive "open pit" isn't really cooking the meat, just reheating it while the pitmaster mops it to get a nice spicy bark. The Lick is huge (there is parking for 1,000 cars) and they do up to a couple of hundred briskets in a weekend. They have a big smoking operation going on where they smoke the meats to a certain temp then wrap them hot in heavy plastic wrap and put them in the fridge. They get pulled as needed to keep pace with the diners. I believe it takes about an hour or so for a brisket to move from the load-in side of the pit to the serving side.

The brisket is consistently ok. The pork ribs are pretty good. The turkey and sausage are excellent.

The-Salt-Lick-BBQ-open-pit by Jeff Hasselberger, on Flickr

I think it's more common than we'd like to believe, in the bbq restaurant biz. There are a couple guys that started a place called Baby Blues, that keep refrigerated partially/fully cooked bbq until the customer orders, then they grill it to heat and sear a bit.
 

PDay

TVWBB Member
I would have though that with the popularity of BBQ now that it would be nigh on impossible for the larger places to [prepare it and serve straight away. Some element of pre preparation must surely be required.
 

 

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