Sous vide question.


 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
I was given a sous vide this year. I've used it a few times for meats and vegetables.

A question, though.

I have 1 lb. of chicken breast tenders in a bag. They submerge into the water with little effort.

When I try vegetables, whether 1 lb. of peas, or a bunch of asparagus, they float. It takes some effort to keep them submerged. Now I actually have an Anovo sous vide container, so when I put the lid on that, it keeps the bag with veggies submerged a little, due to the container having a lid.

Why are the two bags so different, when they contain the same weight?

I do like how the veggies, whether asparagus or Brussels sprouts, turn out (after I've finished them in a pan on high heat.

I just want to know what I can do to keep veggies submerged.

I've tried putting heavy spoons, even a glass, etc. I wish it would easily submerge like the meat bag.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Olympian
Ping pong balls are one of the methods I’ve seen to keep product submerged in covered containers. Look at the “Anova” site.
 

JKalchik

TVWBB Wizard
Ping pong balls are one of the methods I’ve seen to keep product submerged in covered containers. Look at the “Anova” site.
<scratches head> not sure how ping pong balls would keep something submerged, but they are awfully handy to reduce evaporation loss on long sous vide times.

We have a good vacuum sealer, keeping things submerged hasn't been an issue. I'm not sure that I'd use a magnet to keep something submerged, I want the water to be able to circulate all around the bag. Food safe weights just enough to keep it submerged would be ideal in my book.

Something that I do need to try is sous vide creme brulee, in small canning jars. Easy to nail a perfect custard temperature. My sister made these last weekend, nearly the perfect size, and ideal custard.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Olympian
<scratches head> not sure how ping pong balls would keep something submerged, but they are awfully handy to reduce evaporation loss on long sous vide times.

We have a good vacuum sealer, keeping things submerged hasn't been an issue. I'm not sure that I'd use a magnet to keep something submerged, I want the water to be able to circulate all around the bag. Food safe weights just enough to keep it submerged would be ideal in my book.

Something that I do need to try is sous vide creme brulee, in small canning jars. Easy to nail a perfect custard temperature. My sister made these last weekend, nearly the perfect size, and ideal custard.
The idea is that it keeps the produce below water surface level, basic displacement, it works if there is sufficient water for the ping pong balls to push the produce below surface.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Olympian
Well, Anova sells their version of ping pong balls for the very purpose I have stated I’m out on this one. Good luck.
You have to use a lid, I’ve also said that twice.
But the bigger question is why on Gods green earth would anyone thing that peas would be a smart choice for this method of cookery! See ya.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Olympian
You actually need a lid to push the balls down or otherwise they just float.
Exactly! Looking back I seem to have not made that explicitly clear, sorry. I never thought anyone would try to use thousands of ping pong balls to submerge a pound of peas!
 

Lew Newby

TVWBB Guru
The ping pong balls primary purpose is to reduce evaporation when a lid isn’t used. I don’t use them. I vacuum seal the food, put a stainless cooling rack on the food, and put a heavy plate on the rack. Ears of Corn really need weight to hold them submerged.
 
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Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
I'm at a loss as to why you would sous-vide peas.
Just wanted to try it. Instead of steaming peas, I figure if I'm already cooking meat in another bag, try and use that container for peas at the same time.

I wouldn't try the peas on its own (if I weren't already cooking something else).

Brussels sprouts, and asparagus though, I think have come out good.
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
Ping pong balls are one of the methods I’ve seen to keep product submerged in covered containers. Look at the “Anova” site.
The ping pong balls seem simple enough, thanks. The Anova container I now have, has a lid.

So I'd put the bag in; put the ping ball balls in; then put the lid on the container. This seems like it should work.

Thanks.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Olympian
Yes, theoretically that’s how it would work but, as asked earlier…WHY?
For crying in the rain, PEAS? Just put them in a pot with butter, four or five minutes and they are done, why must you continually take the most convoluted route from point A to point B?
I’m putting this one to bed.
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
Yes, theoretically that’s how it would work but, as asked earlier…WHY?
For crying in the rain, PEAS? Just put them in a pot with butter, four or five minutes and they are done, why must you continually take the most convoluted route from point A to point B?
I’m putting this one to bed.
I would probably not do the peas again.

I had done asparagus and Brussels sprouts earlier this year, and I did like how those came out. There was a little bit of an issue with floating with those, so I was looking for a general solution. The ping pong ball solution looks like it would work for other things, if needed, so thanks.
 

 

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