Rotisserie

I've decided to get a rotisserie for my E-310. What is the grill setup for say, whole chicken?

Do i need a drip pan? Which burners should I run? And what temp should I run?

Thanks!
 

LMichaels

TVWBB Hall of Fame
First is this a NS burner grill or a sidewinder. If it's not a sidewinder don't waste your time and money. I tried doing rotisserie on my Summit 450 when I got it thinking it could replace my older Genesis. Wrong. All I got was food cooked on the ends not in the middle. Tried a chicken and by the time the middle of the bird was cooked the ends were dried out and crunchy
 

J Grotz

TVWBB Pro
Larry’s correct. If the controls for the burners are on the front, then it’s not worth it. If the burner controls are on the side you are good to go. Absolutely, use a drip pan with a chicken and put some potatoes in the drip pan. You’ll probably only need to run the front burner to get the temp you’re going for.
BF55CBA5-515A-43CD-B43E-87F01B1EE189.jpeg

Weber sells rotisseries. Also check onegrill. Their motors have more capacity than Weber and they have battery operated options.
 
First is this a NS burner grill or a sidewinder. If it's not a sidewinder don't waste your time and money. I tried doing rotisserie on my Summit 450 when I got it thinking it could replace my older Genesis. Wrong.
My grill is a Genesis II E-310. I had one on my old Genesis Silver B (before the neighbors trampoline took it out in a wind storm) and loved it. I actualy still have that rotisserie, but can't get it to fit/work on my E-310.

All I got was food cooked on the ends not in the middle. Tried a chicken and by the time the middle of the bird was cooked the ends were dried out and crunchy
Hmmm, sounds like a temp issue to me, as I had done whole chickens before, and it turned out great, but its been so long, thus my set questions.
 
Larry’s correct. If the controls for the burners are on the front, then it’s not worth it. If the burner controls are on the side you are good to go. Absolutely, use a drip pan with a chicken and put some potatoes in the drip pan. You’ll probably only need to run the front burner to get the temp you’re going for.
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Weber sells rotisseries. Also check onegrill. Their motors have more capacity than Weber and they have battery operated options.
My grill has 3 burners, running from front to back.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB Hall of Fame
My grill has 3 burners, running from front to back.
Simple way to tell. If your controls are in the front don't waste time or money on a rotisserie for that grill. If you truly want to spin food get another Genesis with controls on the side. If possible find a used one like what you had and re-use the rotisserie you have. There is no way a grill with side to side (controls in front) will produce food on a rotisserie you would like or even close to what you're expecting
 

J Grotz

TVWBB Pro
Chris, anything you put on a spit is going to have a longer side and a shorter side. The spit is always inserted through that long side. The best place for the heat source is along that long side, not directly under the meat (indirect cooking). With your E-330, the heat will come from the short sides where the ends of the meat are on the spit and the ends of the meat will over cook before the middle is done, as Larry explained. Weber has installed IR burners on their Summit grills just to improve rotisserie cooking.

Your signature indicates you have a Performer. If I were you, I would get a rotisserie for your Performer. Weber, Onegrill and Cajun Bandit make rotisserie kits for the 22" kettle. I had a Performer with a roti years ago and loved it. I still miss that grill. Go to the 3:33 mark of this video to see how to set it up.


Here's a Weber video that shows rotisserie on a Summit with the IR burner and on a Performer with the coals piled against one side of the grill.

 

LMichaels

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Now you're talkin'! I didn't realize he had a kettle. I used to have a a kettle myself (well still do but it's only a Jumbo Joe). Anyway I bought the rotisserie kit for it and oh boy did we get some beautiful food off it. Stupid me I gave the whole rig away to a friend of my wife's
 

Rich Dahl

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Like Larry said get a kit for your performer that's the way to go. I have a performer but I also have roti's for my Genesis 2000 and my E320 sidewinder and they perform just fine so I won't invest for a roti set up for the performer.
I did have a Ducane for a short period of time with N/S burners that had a roti and it was worthless, just like Larry said undercooked in the middle and overdone on the ends.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB Hall of Fame
That actually proves what we've been trying to tell you. Look at the over cooked ends. Look at the nearly raw center as well. They just don't work. Weber really gave up something great when they went to that design. Even my Wolf with a rear infrared rotisserie dedicated burner can't hold a candle to my old style Genesis grill. I actually use the IR burner/conventional burner combo on it to make a FANTASTIC pizza grill. As good as any wood fired oven. You already have the proper rotisserie accessory why not just get a Genesis designed for it as a spare grill? That is actually what I did. When I bought my Summit the idea was it would replace my Genesis. The cool thing was the rotisserie from the Genesis fit the Summit 450. I had even put my Genesis up for sale! But then my attempts at using the expensive Summit to do what the Genesis at half the price did so well ended up in utter disappointment (which is why I ended up keeping the Genesis) and much to the chagrin of my wife made me a multi grill kinda guy
 
I thought much of what I saw looked great! And Im not going to get a 2nd gasser just to do rotisserie. And at hundo, its not like Im breaking the bank. (y)

Ive got one on the way from Amazon.
 

PDay

New member
One major downside on the gas rotisserie equipment are the fastenings themselves. The ones on the charcoal set up have nice little thumb turns but the ones on the Spirit rotisserie are these strange little dog leg things that are difficult to tighten as they gouge the meat when you are securing it. Very strange design
 
One major downside on the gas rotisserie equipment are the fastenings themselves. The ones on the charcoal set up have nice little thumb turns but the ones on the Spirit rotisserie are these strange little dog leg things that are difficult to tighten as they gouge the meat when you are securing it. Very strange design
Actually, I know this from my old Silver...the Weber stuff can be a little cumbersome. My old one had a type of mouse trap cage design. It was perfect for ribs and such, while the Genesis 300 series, strictly use a tines, which also punctures the protein. Not a big deal, but maybe some of that old hardware might be able to make work with the new rotisserie. I will see.
 
It arrived today! Weather still a little cool here in Ohio, and last time I checked, there were no small whole chickens, but it's #1 to do on my BBQ schedule!

 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
I have rotisserie units for my old Genny 1000 and the 22” kettle on the Overperformer. I find myself using the kettle five to one turning goods, I am just more practiced in its use.
I need to dip back in that pool again with the Genny, the season is upon us after all!
 
i have very successfully made many a whole chicken on my performer. its actually my wifes favorite meal. for those with a rotisserie:

1. is a whole bird actually better on a rotisserie?
2. i like to stick my temp prob in, and once it hits 160f i pull it off. how do you do that on a rotisserie? i feel like shooting over even by 5degs can make for a dry bird.
 

Jeff Boudman

TVWBB Pro
I like whole chickens better on the rotisserie because the entire chicken gets crispy skin. It’s also quicker for me than indirect on my kettle.
I don’t use a temperature probe. It’s more visually checking the chicken and then checking with a Thermopen.
 

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