using wood on the WSM


 

Rusty James

TVWBB Emerald Member
You're welcome, Murph. :)

I'm doing two butts on my new 14.5" WSM today, but the coal ring is so small, I opted for briquettes only since my lump may leave too many unwanted air gaps due to the many irregularly-shaped pieces. Temps are holding well at 250 as of 4:00pm (started at 12:30pm), and I expect them to rise a bit after surrounding the smoker with a flexible reflective material (similar to the stuff used for windshield sun reflectors) due to breezy conditions, but that's fine with me. I'm using a filled water pan too.

I used three pieces of hickory chunks for what it's worth.


I pulled the meat around midnight after a reading of 195-ish, wrapped it foil, and placed it in a 350° oven for 60 minutes. The meat registered at 205° by then.

I kept good heat (235° to 265°) in the 14.5" WSM all day long, and I could have went another hour or two but I was tired. I gave all of this meat away, so I will have to inquire from others about the overall taste (I nibbled on a little bit). My wife nibbled on some and said it needed more wood. If that's so, maybe I'll try some sorted lump next time.

Sorry, Murph. No hijack intended.
 

Rusty Breaux

TVWBB Fan
Rusty, you place your wood on the bare grate too?

Rusty, Sorry but i was away from the computer all weekend. Below is what i was trying to describe. What kind of wood are you using for the brisket? I have found that Hickory and Pecan will give some decent smoke, but my favorite by FAR is OAK. Post Oak to be exact. In the Minion method, the outside wood lights over time, and the middle piece gives the initial smoke.

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rb
 

Rusty James

TVWBB Emerald Member
Rusty, you have no creosote problems with the center piece of wood? I had issues with creosote, so that is the reason I placed my wood on the bare gate first.

All I have is locally-harvested hickory, store bought apple, and home-grown pecan, although I seldom use the pecan branches for smoke wood. The majority of oak in these parts is called water oak (has slender leaves), and another type of oak with big leaves, but I can't remember the name of it. Post oak sounds like a Texas wood?
 

Dustin Dorsey

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Rusty, you have no creosote problems with the center piece of wood? I had issues with creosote, so that is the reason I placed my wood on the bare gate first.

All I have is locally-harvested hickory, store bought apple, and home-grown pecan, although I seldom use the pecan branches for smoke wood. The majority of oak in these parts is called water oak (has slender leaves), and another type of oak with big leaves, but I can't remember the name of it. Post oak sounds like a Texas wood?

That's the primary wood used in central Texas barbecue. I've never seen that B&B post oak. I'll have to keep an eye out for it. I use mostly pecan and sometimes oak. I've got some branches that I've cut up into chunks I'm wanting to try. I usually put a piece in the center like that, but I also wait until my WSM gets to around 200 before putting the meat on if I'm wanting to settle in around 225. The only time I've ever gotten dirty smoke is when I put my meat on immediately. I know some people get away it and that's fine.
 

Rusty Breaux

TVWBB Fan
That's the primary wood used in central Texas barbecue. I've never seen that B&B post oak. I'll have to keep an eye out for it. I use mostly pecan and sometimes oak. I've got some branches that I've cut up into chunks I'm wanting to try. I usually put a piece in the center like that, but I also wait until my WSM gets to around 200 before putting the meat on if I'm wanting to settle in around 225. The only time I've ever gotten dirty smoke is when I put my meat on immediately. I know some people get away it and that's fine.

Pretty much what he said. I also let the pit temp stabilize for probably 45 mins before putting the meat on. Usually the smoke has thinned out by then and i dont have the problem with the creosote taste.

rb
 

 

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