Using the rotisserie ring to expand cooking space questions.


 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Olympian
The original Weber owners manual from my Dad’s first kettle says “11 minutes per pound” but, that‘s straight indirect, not spinning. With 40 coals in each basket adding ten every hour.
I fill baskets to “crazy full” level and rarely add much, it’s a little easier with the added benefit of the very high heat initially. Now, I want a turkey!
 

ChuckO

TVWBB Olympian
Damn!
I thought it would take at least 3hrs.
How much charcoal are you using and are vents wide open?
Last questions, I promise!
I normally use my charcoal rails, but I've misplaced them so I have been using my charcoal baskets. I will likely run two baskets totally full and I'll put three or four fully lit charcoals on each basket. I run all my vents wide open unless I get excessive heat. I have a candy thermometer (dial) that I put in the top vent, if it gets > 425, I close the top vent a little until it drops back down to 400 and then I reopen it. If the temp drops below 350, I add three or four fully lit charcoals in. I'm on target long as I'm between 375 and 400
 

Rick Poch

TVWBB Super Fan
I normally use my charcoal rails, but I've misplaced them so I have been using my charcoal baskets. I will likely run two baskets totally full and I'll put three or four fully lit charcoals on each basket. I run all my vents wide open unless I get excessive heat. I have a candy thermometer (dial) that I put in the top vent, if it gets > 425, I close the top vent a little until it drops back down to 400 and then I reopen it. If the temp drops below 350, I add three or four fully lit charcoals in. I'm on target long as I'm between 375 and 400
Thanks!
 

Michael Richards

TVWBB Guru
I normally use my charcoal rails, but I've misplaced them so I have been using my charcoal baskets.
I see you used your rails in the video that you posted in this thread, correct?
Do you think that would be about the same size as the slow and sear deluxe?
 

ChuckO

TVWBB Olympian
I see you used your rails in the video that you posted in this thread, correct?
Do you think that would be about the same size as the slow and sear deluxe?
Sorry Michael, I don't know anything about the S&S D. I will say this, the charcoal rails are my favorite accessory, and I highly recommend them. The baskets are OK, but they tend to let the ash pile up. With the rails, you can place the anywhere you want them, and if you're doing a long cook, you can slowly use your sweeps (gently not to float ash) to clear out any piled up ash. I'm pretty sure I'll find my rails before Thanksgiving, I'm sure I put them somewhere safe so that I wouldn't lose them, LOL
 

Richard Garcia

TVWBB Pro
I will say this, the charcoal rails are my favorite accessory, and I highly recommend them.
Listed off Amazon.com for $33.00(Ouch!), however, none available. . Don't remember the last new Weber Kettle which only included these rails???
 
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Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Gold Member

Bill Klinke

TVWBB Fan
Sorry Michael, I don't know anything about the S&S D. I will say this, the charcoal rails are my favorite accessory, and I highly recommend them. The baskets are OK, but they tend to let the ash pile up. With the rails, you can place the anywhere you want them, and if you're doing a long cook, you can slowly use your sweeps (gently not to float ash) to clear out any piled up ash. I'm pretty sure I'll find my rails before Thanksgiving, I'm sure I put them somewhere safe so that I wouldn't lose them, LOL
I've done 20-22lb turkeys on the kettle for decades, mostly with a chimney's worth of KBB (kingsford chimney, 72 briquettes) spread on each side of a big drip pan, no rails or baskets, and then add some chunk at about 1.5 hrs. Takes about the same time as an oven at 350-375, 3 hrs give or take. Now having baskets I will use those this time. Maybe just dumb luck but I have not had a problem with the bird touching the lid.

Done two turkeys that size on the kettle rotisserie, and as usual, it takes less time that way. Weber customer service claimed their motor is rated for 18 lbs; i'm still using it, but also bought a Onegrill motor that's rated for I forget what, 30lbs? It's still just a backup for if/when the weber motor dies.
 

Bill Klinke

TVWBB Fan
I've done a ton of birds as well, but generally in the 12-16lb range. As you know, the height of the bird is a big factor. If I can get the lid closed, that's what I'm going to do. If I can't I'll spin the bird.

I'll probably change my mind at least a dozen times before I cook the damn thing :ROFLMAO:
sounds like this calls for not _one_ test cook, but two!
grin
 

ChuckO

TVWBB Olympian
Listed off Amazon.com for $33.00(Ouch!), however, none available. . Don't remember the last new Weber Kettle which only included these rails???
That's crazy, I don't think I paid $10 for the pair at Walmart maybe 5 years ago. They're very simple and could easily be made for not much money

Here's a link to get the rods for $3.46 USD


There might be stainless steal rods, I didn't find any, but I made minimal effort

Here's a couple photos of mine (found them) as a guide to making home-made

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SgmzVJW.jpg
 

ChuckO

TVWBB Olympian
I've done 20-22lb turkeys on the kettle for decades, mostly with a chimney's worth of KBB (kingsford chimney, 72 briquettes) spread on each side of a big drip pan, no rails or baskets, and then add some chunk at about 1.5 hrs. Takes about the same time as an oven at 350-375, 3 hrs give or take. Now having baskets I will use those this time. Maybe just dumb luck but I have not had a problem with the bird touching the lid.

Done two turkeys that size on the kettle rotisserie, and as usual, it takes less time that way. Weber customer service claimed their motor is rated for 18 lbs; i'm still using it, but also bought a Onegrill motor that's rated for I forget what, 30lbs? It's still just a backup for if/when the weber motor dies.
I have two motors, one that came with my Genesis and one that came with my kettle ring. I've spun 26LBS with no problem. If ever there is a problem I'm sure you could simply replace the brushes in the motor, or maybe the gears (probably plastic) I've actually always wanted to open up one of my motors to see what's inside, but that flies in the face of my # 1 rule: Don't fix what ain't broke
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Gold Member
I have two motors, one that came with my Genesis and one that came with my kettle ring. I've spun 26LBS with no problem. If ever there is a problem I'm sure you could simply replace the brushes in the motor, or maybe the gears (probably plastic) I've actually always wanted to open up one of my motors to see what's inside, but that flies in the face of my # 1 rule: Don't fix what ain't broke
ChuckO, the most commonly used motor for a light duty rotisserie is a C-frame shaded pole motor. That type of motor doesn't have brushes nor does it have a lot of torque without gear reduction. Fortunately for load rating it is geared down quite a bit to get the slow rotational speed required for spinning. The load rating given is for a balanced load so balancing is a very good thing. For safety, there may be a thermal fuse in the winding to prevent the potential for a fire if overloaded, or the gears may be made such that they will eventually wear out and strip under a sustained overload.
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Gold Member
I might be wrong, but I think it takes a lot to wear one of these out. I had one failure, my original Weber motor that came with the roti ring, but I never took care of it and left it outside and it finally quit on me. It was so long ago I don't remember much but I took it apart and I couldn't make it work again or see anything obviously wrong with it, so I just bought another one. Then not too long ago the replacement wouldn't start so I took it apart, couldn't find anything wrong with it, and when I put it back together it started working again. Since then I got a battery powered motor with a roti setup from OneGrill that is really noisy and a nice Weber motor that came with a grill I bought just for its tables and that motor is extremely quiet and a pleasure to use. Those shaded pole motors are so simple looking, they are rugged and reliable, and they've been around for well over 100 years, yet they are hard for me to understand how they work and how they can fail.

 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Gold Member
Listed off Amazon.com for $33.00(Ouch!), however, none available. . Don't remember the last new Weber Kettle which only included these rails???
Also, there is this. Sometimes the simple ideas are the most brilliant!


hDbXqXdh.jpg
 

ChuckO

TVWBB Olympian
I might be wrong, but I think it takes a lot to wear one of these out. I had one failure, my original Weber motor that came with the roti ring, but I never took care of it and left it outside and it finally quit on me. It was so long ago I don't remember much but I took it apart and I couldn't make it work again or see anything obviously wrong with it, so I just bought another one. Then not too long ago the replacement wouldn't start so I took it apart, couldn't find anything wrong with it, and when I put it back together it started working again. Since then I got a battery powered motor with a roti setup from OneGrill that is really noisy and a nice Weber motor that came with a grill I bought just for its tables and that motor is extremely quiet and a pleasure to use. Those shaded pole motors are so simple looking, they are rugged and reliable, and they've been around for well over 100 years, yet they are hard for me to understand how they work and how they can fail.

Shaded Pole Motor.....sounds shady :)
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Gold Member
The speed of a shaded pole motor is governed by the AC frequency, 3600 RPM @60Hz in this case (nominal, not accounting for slip). If the spit turns at 3 RPM (1 turn in 20 seconds), that gear reduction is 1200:1. That's a lot of gearing.

Torque multiplication goes the other way (1:1200 - motor torque is multiplied 1200 times to get output torque), so any grit or debris or dried grease in the gearing along the way can cause big problems.

The mechanical part is easy for me to understand, but the electromagnetic theory of operation, not so much.
 
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