Sous Vide Setup

WBegg

TVWBB Pro


It works! This was a test with water of the yogurt making temp! Thanks WBegg!
What settings are you using? Make sure your fan settings are 100% min and 100% max. this puts the output in on/off mode. Also, I use PID settings of 10, 0.007, 16. This generates a perfectly flat output on my graphs.

Glad you enjoy.
 

Joost Westra

New member
Very nice setup. Do you have to do many stepts to switch from BBQ to Sous Vide? (Software and Hardware). Same temperature probe? Different PID values?
 

SeanDennis

New member
My apologies for ressurecting an old thread,. I do have a question. I have a heatermeter I am trying to add the sous vide/ brewing functionality. I have the 3d print from thingiverse and all connections mostly set up. However I would like to use my DS18b20 waterproof sensor with my heatermeter for sensing water temperature. Can I run this through the board by connecting the 3 wires to my third thermistor jack on the heatermeter ? Or if I had bought a 2.5mm male jack to the DS18b20 temperature sensor (has 3 wires)could I connect this to the current thermistor jack and run the sensor? Lastly I could possibly just run the DS18b20 direct to the gpio of the raspberry pi and when plugged in still use the heatermeter software to control the temperature?
 

David Dismuke

New member
My understanding is that the DS18B20 is a digital sensor, so I dont think it will work with an analog thermistor jack. I have used the DS18B20 in an Arduino project and had to wire it to one of the digital pins and use the OneWire library to control it. Not sure how that would work with a Rasperry Pi though and doubt that functionality is built into the HM software.
 

Bryan Mayland

TVWBB Honor Circle
Yeah exactly, the inputs to the HeaterMeter are analog voltages for all the probes and the DS18B20 is a digital one-wire device so HeaterMeter won't communicate with it. You could connect it to the Pi but there's no mechanism to feed external temperatures into HeaterMeter so it won't be able to use the information. We also don't include any of the kernel code for the Pi to communicate with 1-wire devices so you'd face an uphill battle there as well.

In short there's not any way to use a DS18B20 as an input sensor with the HeaterMeter without going to great lengths in both hardware and software.
 

Christopher L

New member
Sorry to revive an old thread, but I was thinking about getting into sous vide. I had bookmarked this back when v2 of this case was designed, but now that I'm ready to start, it looks like some of the diagrams are missing from some of the posts. Would it be possible to get a picture of the inside of the assembled v2 case and if you have a full parts list that would be great too. So far I've been able to identify that I'd need the following:


  • Fused power connector part # 693-6200.2100
  • Power Plug part # 562-738W-X2/01
  • 5mm 12 volt LED
  • A 330ish Ohm current limiting resister in series with one of the legs of the above LED. There were so many resistors in Mouser that I was having a hard time trying to figure out what was important on this to limit my search down. Any help would be appreciated. Is a 1w resister sufficient or do I need something beefier?
  • DC-AC 25A Solid State Relay - Is there a better one to use? Is there one from Mouser that is worthwhile and affordable? I wasn't having much luck with my search.
  • Cat5 plug is a C-Tech brand found at any Home Depot
  • 3d printed case
  • M6x1 cap head screws x4 I believe
  • Miscellaneous connector wire.
  • 3-prong US appliance cord (which I should be able to scavenge from the junk bin but am including for completeness).
  • Crock pot (obviously)
  • Heatermeter (obviously)
  • Waterproof temperature probe of some sort such as this

Am I missing anything else? Thanks in advance for any assistance!
 
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Christopher L

New member
I know everyone is probably rushing towards the holidays, but does anyone have any thoughts on what is needed for a sous vide build? As mentioned in my previous post, I've tried to do my due diligence looking at previous posts, but it looks like there is missing info at this point in time.... Thanks in advance for any advice that can be given.
 

VicusJ

New member
Hi Christopher - sorry, not able to give you any sound advice to your questions, but thought to share my experience re getting into Sous Vide. I started to build a contraption using my HM and other bits& pieces - no doubt the HM in itself is a wonderful device with all it s features. However in the end I bought one of those stick Sous Vide cookers and don't look back. We use it very regularly, is very user friendly whereas my wife wouldn't wanted to touch my homebuild SV monstrosity. And easy to store in the kitchen drawers.
 

WBegg

TVWBB Pro
Hi Christopher - sorry, not able to give you any sound advice to your questions, but thought to share my experience re getting into Sous Vide. I started to build a contraption using my HM and other bits& pieces - no doubt the HM in itself is a wonderful device with all it s features. However in the end I bought one of those stick Sous Vide cookers and don't look back. We use it very regularly, is very user friendly whereas my wife wouldn't wanted to touch my homebuild SV monstrosity. And easy to store in the kitchen drawers.
I did the same.
 

Bryan Mayland

TVWBB Honor Circle
I did the same.
I also have an actual sous vide stick, despite the fact that I have 20 HeaterMeters, SSRs, and heating elements. There was just too much junk on the counter with the HeaterMeter setup, and you can't really probe the food temps so most of the functionality of HeaterMeter isn't used. The pump circulating helps too.

To answer the question though, you take the HeaterMeter in PULSE output mode, set the min fan speed to 100%. For hardware, you then take the blower output -> solid state relay input, then insert the SSR output into your heating element. I put the SSR in an electrical box and wired it to an outlet so I could just plug in the heater element and it keeps the live mains wires out of the way.
 

John_Shep

New member
Years ago I built an Alton Brown electric clay pot smoker after seeing it on Good Eats.

I rarely use it, but it is quite good for low temperature smoking of fish - Salmon & Local Cheasapeake Bay Rockfish come out great. I've been using the internal temp control on the hotplate heater, which is problematic because the internal structure causes the hotplate to heat faster than the food rack. I'm thinking the Sous Vide control on the HM is a perfect solution. I'll just bypass the internal temp controller in the hotplate, and use the HM Sous Vide. Added benefit is I can probe the food and the cook temp.

The only challenge is finding that box of SSRs that is somewhere in my basement.

smoker.jpg
 

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