Dual Weber crafted griddles on Genesis 400 series?


 

Mack Manning

TVWBB Fan
FYI, I asked the question to Weber and they were useless. 6 emails later with Indian reps reading from scripts and nagging for a serial number, they failed to answer the question and instead offered to sell me the dumb design 7599 griddle I already have.

If you own any Weber shares, I suggest you sell them.
 

Mack Manning

TVWBB Fan
I finally got a real answer. Weber does not recommend using 2 Crafted griddles at the same time.

"Thanks for reaching out to us about using two griddles on your Genesis II S 435.

You are correct this is not recommended by us. Using two griddles hinders the proper amount of airflow needed and could overheat your food and your grill.

Please let me know if you have any more questions and thank you for being part of the Weber family!“
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Mack. That is the safe answer. If you exercise a reasonable degree of caution, you can just refrain from running your grill on HI. But, if you don't trust yourself, then, best to stick to one griddle at a time.
 

Jon Tofte

TVWBB Olympian
To some extent this same care needs to be exercised when using GrillGrates. I would counsel against trying to cover every square inch of grill space when using GrillGrates and instead leave a little bit of "breathing room" on each side. Also, don't let those vent holes get all clogged up. A combination of clogged vent holes and no space can trap too much heat in your firebox with unhappy results.
 
Mack -- what are your thoughts on the "dumb" 7599 design? Asking because I want to get a griddle for a friend that has a Gen II S-310.

Is it dumb because the curved section takes up space making the cooking surface smaller than it needs to be? Or something else?

My alternative would be a half set of GrillGrates, the flat side of which is a decent griddle. Only issue with that is that those are that you'd have a bit of a gap. The 7599 would be a nicer fit.

Thanks.
 

Mack Manning

TVWBB Fan
Mack -- what are your thoughts on the "dumb" 7599 design? Asking because I want to get a griddle for a friend that has a Gen II S-310.

Is it dumb because the curved section takes up space making the cooking surface smaller than it needs to be? Or something else?

My alternative would be a half set of GrillGrates, the flat side of which is a decent griddle. Only issue with that is that those are that you'd have a bit of a gap. The 7599 would be a nicer fit.

Thanks.
Jim, I have a few gripes with the 7599. In order of importance to me:

The recessed cooking area is small because lots of space is wasted with the large flanges and grease trough. Especially on my 4-burner grill, they could have made the area much larger.

The hole in the trough is tiny, so you must lift junk out of it to clean it. Enlarging it would compromise the enamel.

Finally, it slopes towards the trough so eggs and oil run that way. I prefer a level griddle so I can move the oil as needed.

To Weber's credit, the enamel is smooth and even tougher than my Staub pans. It's also easy to clean. Mine looks new after maybe a dozen uses including searing steaks at very high temps, burning fajita marinades, etc. It's stored outside in humid NC.

A 17" Lodge skillet has more usable cooking area and can also be used for deep or shallow frying, baking and other things.

If you're feeling really generous, the new Crafted griddle and rack have lots more cooking area and will fit the 310, but it's $170 total and must be seasoned and maintained to avoid rust.
 
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Thanks Mack.

What do you think about this one?


Not Weber branded so a good bit cheaper. Gets rid of the curved flange, so more cooking area side to side. Still slanted with a trough, but less slanted than Weber 7599. Since it is symmetrical, I assume you could position the trough in the front or the back.

I like this one better than the Weber version, but maybe a half set of GrillGrates is better still? The GG flat side is a pretty good griddle.

Is it hard to get the surface of the 7599 hot? This would probably get used for for shrimp, smashburgers and veggies rather than breakfast. The flat GGs are very easy to get hot for searing.

Thanks for any thoughts.
 

Mack Manning

TVWBB Fan
If the enamel is as tough as they say, that one seems better than the Weber. Larger cooking area, larger drain hole, less slope. All good.

It's not hard to get the griddle hot, actually quite the opposite. Once you heat that 15lb lump, you can turn off the burners if you're just searing some meat or frying eggs.

I learned to quickly steam clean it in place and not try to move it until after we eat. It takes quite a while to cool and it's a little awkward to lift out, especially when hot.
 

 

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