Adirondack Chairs, kiln-dried fir wood, stain and seal recommendation

I bought a couple Adirondack chairs that are natural unfinished kiln-dried fir wood.
I'd like to stain and seal them or simply just seal them. I don't want to spend a ton of money, but would like to apply something to help keep these from wearing down quickly.
They will be primarily be used on concrete under my deck, in my grilling area 😎
 

BobJ

TVWBB Super Fan
I use Spar Varnish on the canoes I build, not cheap, but this is the good stuff.


They make a Rapidcoat that does not require sanding between coats, might be nice on something like a chair that'd be a hassle to sand. I have no experience with it though.
 

timothy

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Depends on what you're looking for. The last batch I built for my Mom was just rubbed with a penetrating oil.
I like the weathered look, and pressure wash em after a few years to bring them up to fresh.
Tim
 
Depends on what you're looking for. The last batch I built for my Mom was just rubbed with a penetrating oil.
I like the weathered look, and pressure wash em after a few years to bring them up to fresh.
Tim
Can you give an example of this? When I think of penetrating oil, I think of something like Liquid Wrench.

Mainly just looking for a low cost, easy to maintain option. I've thought about just using decking stain. I've heard Spar Varnish would be good, but not an easy applicaion like Bob mentioned.

Also, do you guys recommend applying whatever stain or oil I decide to use before I assemble? I assume that would be the best option even thought would be more work.
 
I've got a whole container of boiled linseed oil. I use it on my black plastics and cut it 50/50 with paint thinner.

Would that 50/50 mix be good for adirondack chairs?
 

timothy

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Yea, you could, I would, just cut it so it's easier to apply.
The danish oil is cut with linseed and mineral spirits.
Probably will take 3-4 applications.

Tim
 

BobJ

TVWBB Super Fan
Tung Oil is a penetrating oil, I use it on paddles so the handle stays with a natural feel. I do reapply yearly.
 
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BobJ

TVWBB Super Fan
Just ran into this in a refinishing article... See the last sentance.

Marine "spar varnish" is much softer than furniture or floor varnish, particularly in the sun or when it is very hot. Some spar varnish brands feel "sticky" when they are hot even after they are fully cured. This is a perfectly natural effect that allows the spar varnish to expand and contract along with the wood in the extreme marine environment. Modern spar varnishes also have UV inhibitors added to block the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation from the sun. For both of these reasons, you should never use floor varnish outside on your boat and it is not recommended to use spar varnish on the floors of your house or on furniture that will be subjected to long periods of sitting unless you don't mind seeing the seat of your pants permanently imprinted in your priceless heirloom.
 
Just ran into this in a refinishing article... See the last sentance.

Marine "spar varnish" is much softer than furniture or floor varnish, particularly in the sun or when it is very hot. Some spar varnish brands feel "sticky" when they are hot even after they are fully cured. This is a perfectly natural effect that allows the spar varnish to expand and contract along with the wood in the extreme marine environment. Modern spar varnishes also have UV inhibitors added to block the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation from the sun. For both of these reasons, you should never use floor varnish outside on your boat and it is not recommended to use spar varnish on the floors of your house or on furniture that will be subjected to long periods of sitting unless you don't mind seeing the seat of your pants permanently imprinted in your priceless heirloom.
Hmmm, that's good to know!

I am actually in the process of using the Boiled Linseed oil. On chair 1 I've applied the first coat of 50/50 boiled linseed oil / paint thinner mix.
It darkened the wood up a little. Still waiting for it to dry. Next coat I'm going to go a little heavier on the linseed oil, I think maybe 60/40....
Not sure how many coats I'll end up doing.

I think on another forum, I found where someone said...
Apply 1 coat per day for 1 week
Then 1 coat each month for a year
Then 1 coat each year after that...

I'm sure that would provide incredible protection and looks, I'm just not sure I have the motivation to be doing all that....
Probably will just do 3 coats. Then a year later if they need a refresher, I'll pressure wash and apply more oil.
 

J Grotz

TVWBB Pro
Check out the Wood Whisperer on youtube, especially this one. The beginning deals with the failure of spar varnish finish and reluctance to use film finishes in the future. At the end, he uses an oil finish and talks a little about it.

 

timothy

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Check out the Wood Whisperer on youtube, especially this one. The beginning deals with the failure of spar varnish finish and reluctance to use film finishes in the future. At the end, he uses an oil finish and talks a little about it.

I like that guy. I had this bookmarked from awhile back and forgot to post it.

Tim
 
After second coat dried I was happy with the looks. So I moved it to it's new home on my covered front porch.

Will do second chair the same way to match. If I was doing this again, I'd just go 100% boiled linseed oil on both coats. If you plan on letting it dry a day in between coats then that is the way to go. I think adding paint thinner just helps to speed up the drying time, so if you were wanting to do multiple coats in a day then cut it with paint thinner.

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