A Butt Rub (for Jane)


 

Jane Cherry

TVWBB All-Star
I strictly use Diamond Crystal kosher salt for food. I have a coarse kosher salt that I use for pasta water only, it's cheap and don't use the more expensive just for that purpose.

I am not versed with sea salts, although there are excellent ones out there. Regular salt does taste metallic, so I would definitely stay away from that. I would use a good quality sea salt over anything non-iodized, but highly recommend Diamond Crystal for every day cooking. I like it better than Morton brand.
 

Jeff Boudman

TVWBB Wizard
Would you salt "natural" enhanced (broth w/salt)ribs the same as unenhanced ribs? Just curious, as I'm seeing more and more enhanced ribs. In fact, I now have to buy local Tamworth hog ribs to have unenhanced ribs.
 

Jane Cherry

TVWBB All-Star
The enhanced, just very lightly with a lighter Kosher salt like Diamond Crystal. Costco sells unenhanced ribs, as does Albertson's, but Kroger here does not. I have salted the enhanced just ever so slightly and then applied the rub.
 

Robert J.M.

New member
Terrific! Everyone raved, said it was better than the local BBQ place! Thanks for everyone's help. The rub had a different, strong, smell and was not hot at all either the NM peppers I got were not very hot or because of all the seeds that fell out before grinding and speaking of the grinding... There were a few hiccups.

I trimmed and then salted the shoulders with the Sea Salt, letting them sit while I made the rub and when I put the peppers into the grinder, HUUUUMMMMMM and it barely turned. Hop in the car (Meat still on the counter) run to Wal-Mart, buy grinder, race home, grind peppers which takes 5 runs and almost all of the NM pepper package, finish making rub, rub meat, put in ziplock bag turn around and see sugar box on counter and realize I was so busy trying to grind peppers that I forgot the sugar, pull meat out of bag, estimate sugar needed based on rub left in bowl, rub sugar on meat, put back in bag, zip slide bag won't close for rub in track, try another bag, still wont close, clean track, close bag with pliers, put meat in fridge, big sigh of relief

Now notice huge mess in kitchen, glad the wife is gone for the day, back to fridge to open cold beer, sit in chair watch Open Golf and drink beers before cleaning kitchen.
 

Zac_Callier

TVWBB Fan
Wow, that is a lot of compliments you are getting, Kevin! Is there any reason you do not use much (or any) paprika in your rubs? I have researched several of your different recipes, most do not have it, and one that did had it later nixed out upon further review, I believe. I think I saw you said it can interfere/clash with the smoky flavor from the woods, but to use it in instances where you are not using wood (or grilling).

My current personal rub has quite a bit paprika and everyone so far has liked it, but seeing how so many people are loving your myriad of rubs, perhaps I am missing something, and should be focusing on more chili powder (ancho/guajillo) and coffee/cocoa combos instead?

Personally, mine is, off the top of my head:
1/4 cup paprika
2 T salt
2 T pepper
1 T cayenne powder
1 T onion powder
1 T garlic powder
1 T coriander
1 T cumin
1 T oregano
1 T ground mustard seeds
1/2 T chili powder (blend, but going to go w/ancho next time)
and I apply turbinado sugar as desired directly to the given piece of meat.
Also, with people raving about using salt separately, I am interested in trying that as well.

Thanks
 

K Kruger

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I do not use smoked paprika in rubs for barbecue (or chipotle) because the smoky flavor of either can clash with the smoke from the wood. Even when it might not, if one is using smoke wood, no need for smoked chile.

I do not use 'regular' paprika in rubs because it doesn't really do anything but add bulk and color. Its rather subtle flavor will not stand up to long dry cooking. Also, over an extended period it tends toward bitterness. For chile flavor (paprika is a chile after all) there are far better choices.

I do not use mustard in rubs either. Heat destroys mustard's flavor so it is wasted.
 

Zac_Callier

TVWBB Fan
Finally got around to trying jane's butt rub...it turned out well. I subbed the new mexico chili powder out for cayenne (which I cut the dose in half) and it was just right spicy. Amply salted the butt, cracked a bit of salt and sprinkled some seasoning onto the pork after pulling, and everyone loved it. Added some of the seasoning mix to some of Steve Petrone's Lexington sauce and it was incredible. Am very interested to try a rub w/cocoa and coffee that i've seen KK giving out. Thanks again for the advice and the many, many helpful posts, Kevin.
 

Jane Cherry

TVWBB All-Star
Just whipped up another batch for butt and ribs tomorrow. Didn't quite have enough NM chile powder, so I used some guajillo to make up the difference. Smells so good.
 

jfowler

New member
kevin,

what can i substitute for the new mexico powder
incase i cant find it here? I have the ancho just not the new mexico.

thanks alot for your contribution and time
 

Robert J.M.

New member
Hey:

I cannot find hot New Mexico Peppers in town and my wife doesn't like the hot rubs I have used so I haven't tried to get hotter peppers. I buy my NM (and Ancho and Guajillo) whole from a local "Mexican" grocery and grind them fresh in a Coffee Grinder. Since my NM Peppers are just warm I have used Guajillo as a substitue and it was very good as well.

Robert
 

Mark B

TVWBB Pro
Finally giving this rub a try after reading about it a couple years ago.

I had not much spicy chile on hand, but at least made up the difference in amount with Ancho and Mulato. Everything else was in the pantry, which was nice for a change.

The rub smelled like no other I've used, very much looking forward to the results.

This is going on pork shoulders tonight for a low 'n slow.
 

Jane Cherry

TVWBB All-Star
So I'm looking for a rub recipe because, for once, I am completely out. Got three racks of ribs for Saturday (July 4th is traditionally shrimp and scallop ceviche night). Although I am cooking for a client Saturday, the ribs can cook while I'm in the kitchen. So, the reason I come back to this rub that was named for me? No salt and no paprika. Kevin has trained me well. Salt your meat first and exclude paprika for lack of flavor. No sauce either - I like to taste the rib itself and a rub that enhances the rib's flavor, not the sauce. I've been spoiled. Thanks again Kevin for recipes and training.
 

Jim Lampe

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
this is STILL the only rub I use for pork shoulder, I believe it is the finest.
and it has a great name ;)
 

Rita Y

TVWBB Emerald Member
Larry, since Kevin's formula is intended as a dry rub, and considering the balance of the other spices, I would say that the 2 teaspoons ginger would be the ground ginger. For a whole butt, you would need more fresh ginger than 2 teaspoons to make any impact.

Rita
 

Ray Crick

TVWBB Emerald Member
Larry, since Kevin's formula is intended as a dry rub, and considering the balance of the other spices, I would say that the 2 teaspoons ginger would be the ground ginger. For a whole butt, you would need more fresh ginger than 2 teaspoons to make any impact.

Rita

Hi Rita - hope you have great 2014.

I ofter substitute galangal for ginger. It seems to be a bit stronger with a hint of citrus scent. My wife prefers it over powdered ginger. We get it from Penzey's.

Ray
 

Rita Y

TVWBB Emerald Member
Hi Ray! And a very happy 2014 to you and all my friends at TVWB. I don't keep galangal in my too-large spice collection, but it sounds like something I'd like (I've only used fresh and liked it.) I'll pick some up at my too-handy Penzey's store so I can play with it. Your wife may to on to something. I bugged Penzey's so much that they finally put in a store about 10 minutes away from me in Sandy Springs, GA. I was their first customer.

Rita
 

 

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