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Thread: Copycat Burgers (double double)

  1. #1
    TVWBB Olympian Clint's Avatar
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    Copycat Burgers (double double)

    I was never a big fan of In N Out burger so I didn't go there more than once every couple of years, but last Saturday we stopped on our way out & I really liked my double double (animal style). So I stopped & got another for lunch on Monday (loved it), and then again yesterday (friday) for lunch, and while it was good yesterday, the meat wasn't very good and reminded me of burger king which I never eat anymore.

    So I found a couple of copycat recipes:

    https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...er-recipe.html
    (this one has instructions on making ground beef using a food processor - I don't have a grinder so maybe I could try this)
    this recipe also says to spread mustard on the raw side of the patty before flipping....

    This is the one I was looking at yesterday:
    https://topsecretrecipes.com/foodhac...double-double/

    4" patties sound small, but the burger yesterday seemed big, almost like a double whopper. I got a burger press earlier this year and the 4.5" patties really seemed small compared to how I usually make them.

    And now onto the cheese: American. Is it velveeta? I got some, not long ago. Guess I'm about to look for some that say slices and not singles?

    https://www.cheese.com/american-cheese/

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/07/...an-cheese.html

    "The process itself was invented in Switzerland, in an effort to reduce cheese waste; scraps from various batches of cheese could be melted together and formed into a new, delicious product. In 1916, Canadian-American entrepreneur and cheese salesman James Kraft perfected the technique in the US, patented it, and started selling the very first process American cheese. It soon became immensely popular due to its long shelf life and easy shipping."

  2. #2
    TVWBB Hall of Fame LMichaels's Avatar
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    Re, grinding the meat in a FP vs a grinder. I have a Hobart Food grinder attachment for my KitchenAid Mixer. It works pretty well but honestly I prefer making ground beef in the food processor. I have 2. A large KitchenAid and a small Cuisinart. Both do a great job just that the KA can do more at once

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    TVWBB Olympian Clint's Avatar
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    I've read about using the food processor to make hamburger, might have watched a video too. The link said to put the bowl & blade in the freezer, and to cut the meat into 1" cubes and put it in the freezer for ??20 minutes iirc. Do you think it's worth the extra effort rather than just buying ground chuck?

    Guess if I'm grinding (chopping) it myself it'd be the perfect time to mix in a little garlic, onion, pepper, or jalapeno.

  4. #4
    TVWBB Hall of Fame LMichaels's Avatar
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    Honestly I don't bother with any of that. I just trim it to get rid of hard gristle, excess fat. I like to keep the fat ratio about 25 to 30& (I know the health nits can tune out now) but it's what I like. I typically will be chuck but I will mix in some cheap ribeye (select grade) or some brisket too. I like the fact that I can be sure I will have absolutely no bone chips in the meat either. I have caused more dental damage to my teeth due to burgers than anything else thanks to careless trimming and bone chips being present in the meat

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    I've done the "grinding" in a food processor a number of times. To me the final product comes out with a lot more "tooth" than you'd get with conventional double-ground beef. More like you're chewing a mouthful of little tiny pieces of steak than something that's been smashed into oblivion. I think it makes a superior burger. That said, I've not done it in ages because it is a lot of work. I don't think freezing the bowl or the blade would make much difference but I did put the cut chunks of beef in the freezer until they firmed up. That allows it to be chopped by the food processor rather than smeared around the bowl. Be sure to work in small batches.

    I'd think the best approach would be to try it once. That's the only way you're going to be able to judge for yourself.

  6. #6
    TVWBB Diamond Member Len Dennis's Avatar
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    A cheese "slice"? C'mon Clint, it's gotta be old cheddar or nuttin' . Or provolone. Or swiss.

    You want cheese? Then use cheese. Not that processed #^#%@^ .
    So many recipes, so little time
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  7. #7
    TVWBB Olympian Clint's Avatar
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    I made a double batch of the spread from the 2nd link: (mainly because it called for dill pickles - I used Dill Zingers)

    Ribeye was only $1/lb more than chuck (I went to a diff store hoping to find chuck around $4/lb).



    Chilled the meat in the freezer for 20 minutes, it got slightly stiff


    very interesting! 1/3# batches is probably best to get it to the right texture in ~12 one-second pulses


    12 two-ounce patties - Roxy got the scraps, bones, and the leftovers that didn't hit 2 oz (raw)


    I tried to flatten them in my burger press but they were just too thin, so I put a wax paper square above, one below, and mashed them into the form to try to get a consistent size (4.5" press)


    seasoned both sides of the meat pretty heavily with S&P


    added mustard before the flip like it said in the first link
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  8. #8
    TVWBB Olympian Clint's Avatar
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    Crusty!










    Not Bad! I went back for some more burger sauce once, halfway through, not sure what I'll try different next time. Thinner slice of onion will be the first thing, I guess, or maybe I'll fry up the slice of onion to soften the bite (strong flavor). Also, the cheese sticking to the pan - it was good, but maybe I'll put it on right before I take the meat out of the pan.

  9. #9
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    Now that's what I call a double double. Awesome. Thanks for sharing.

    Bill
    Smokin in San Diego on a WSM 22.5, Weber 26.75, Weber Platinum Performer, PK Grill, Genesis S-330 and a MAK 2 Star. Love them all.

  10. #10
    TVWBB Diamond Member Len Dennis's Avatar
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    Next time, do one WITHOUT the mustard coat and compare. Like our ribs, I never taste the mustard. After cooking, I suspect your burgers don't benefit from it either. As a condiment, sure but part of the cooking process? Have my doubts.

    Look great though (love that "crispy"--tons of flavour that way).
    So many recipes, so little time
    : Genesis gas grill 18.5" WSM Maverick ET-732 :

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