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AL. T
11-20-2008, 06:54 PM
Any suggestions for good frying pans for my lovely wife ?? Thanks.......AL

Bryan S
11-20-2008, 07:05 PM
I'm sold on Calphalon per Kevin Kruger's reccomendation. I just picked up a pair of omelet pans recently and just love them. Do you want non-stick, hard anodized, or stainless? Either way they are great pans with the best designed handles.

Jeff E.
11-21-2008, 03:13 AM
Hi Al,

Check out this (http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST&f=108&t=25717) in depth discussion and you will have all the necessary information to make an informed decision.

That being said, I use cast iron skillets and also clad type cookware with an interior of stainless steel or clad with an interior AND exterior of stainless depending upon what I'm cooking. You should also handle the cookware to determine how comfortable it is for you.

Good luck with your choice.

Paul K
11-21-2008, 06:48 AM
I too use some Calphalon in addition to cast iron and some generic non-stick pans. I pick my Calphalon up a nearby outlet store at substantial savings; see if you have one in your area.

Paul

Don Irish
11-26-2008, 04:22 PM
I love my All-Clad...expensive, but I used the 20% off coupons if have from BBB.

J Rector
11-27-2008, 12:30 PM
calphalon fan here to there warranty is top notch. We've had sevaral nonstick pans go bad over period of 6-8yrs and they've always replaced them with the current version . No questions asked. This warranty is on there higher end nonstick . Idont know about the cheaper stuff.

j biesinger
12-13-2008, 03:43 AM
I love my All-Clad...expensive, but I used the 20% off coupons if have from BBB.

didn't think those work on all clad.

a pan depends on usage. If non-stick is the key then calphalon or analon (what I use) are nice. If high heat searing is important, then you probably need stainless clad aluminum. All clad is nice but for my BIG fry pan I went with a j. a. henckles international that has worked well and was about 1/2 as much as all clad, and has a much more comfortable handle.

K Kruger
12-13-2008, 05:53 AM
If high heat searing is important, then you probably need stainless clad aluminum
Not at all. Anodized aluminum (not nostick) works great. No steel to get in the way either. But, yes, you forgo the 'shiny factor'. I'm not one for shiny pans myself, but I do get that probably most people are.

j biesinger
12-13-2008, 07:19 AM
I thought stainless was more for non-reactivity? similar to anodizing aluminum?

K Kruger
12-13-2008, 08:38 AM
It is. It doesn't conduct heat as well as aluminum which is why better SS pans have an aluminum core, the best an aluminum core which also goes up the sides on the pan.

Dan H.
12-13-2008, 08:26 PM
damn... was Christmas shopping today and seen a two set omlet setup at Target and im 98% sure it was this brand.. 40.00 dollars. ring a bell? is that a fair price? uhh... one was 10 inch and the other ...maybe??.. 16?

Bryan S
12-13-2008, 08:31 PM
Originally posted by Dan H.:
damn... was Christmas shopping today and seen a two set omlet setup at Target and im 98% sure it was this brand.. 40.00 dollars. ring a bell? is that a fair price? uhh... one was 10 inch and the other ...maybe??.. 16?
The Calphalon Non-Stick set is for the 10" and 12" omelet pans only, no lids for about $50.00 http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
And OBTW, I love them pans/set. DUDE!!! They rock. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

K Kruger
12-14-2008, 05:16 AM
I think Target carries Calphalon's 'Kitchen Essential's line. It is their line they make for Target only, iirc. It is a bit lower end in terms of construction and has a 10- or 20-year warranty, depending on whether or not it's a 'Pro' piece, as opposed to the lifetime warranty of their higher end lines.

Chris S Lewis
12-14-2008, 05:47 AM
Cook's Illustrated did a review on 12" Skillets in this month's issue. They gave the All Clad Stainless Model 5112 their highest mark. At $135 it is a little pricy but also in all likly hood the last one you'll ever need to buy.

I was going to add it to my Christmas wish list and if Santa doesn't come through I'll pick one up for myself.

Be careful though because they also reviewed a 13" All Clad "French Slillet" which got the lowest marks.

This is, of course, if non-stick and non-reactive are important to your choice.

Rita Y
12-14-2008, 06:26 AM
Chris, be sure to check the All-Clad skillet handles. They are quite narrow and when a large skillet is full of food, they can tip to the side unless you have a strong grip. That's my only gripe with All-Clad--the handles. I have to use 2 hands sometimes.

Rita

K Kruger
12-14-2008, 06:48 AM
Yet another CI test I can't buy into. I suppose if one sautés with utensils it is less of an issue, but I'm hard pressed to understand how CI's editors who, presumably, are somewhat beyond the 'home cook' level, can so easily ignore the horrible handles of All-Clad. One would expect at least a mention (I don't know about the current test results but their former results didn't mention them, iirc). Advanced and pro cooks scarcely use utensils--they flip the pan; that CI would pretend otherwise is a failure.

I've not used Calphalon's SS line but the pans from Viking and those of Sur la Table's proprietary line (doubtless, neither included in CI's test) have the same or better construction in terms of cladding--and far better handles. Personally, I prefer anodized aluminum which, also iirc, CI dismisses as 'difficult to control'--or some other similarly ridiculous statement. One wonders if their testers understand cooking science and fundamentals at all.

Rita Y
12-14-2008, 07:13 AM
One of the things CI didn't like about anodized aluminum was the dark color, finding it difficult to judge the browning of fond (so they said), and especially when caramelizing sugar.

Rita

K Kruger
12-14-2008, 08:27 AM
Not surprising and very much in keeping with their often pretentious yet meritless 'philosophy'. Have none of them caramelized sugar before? They have inadequate lighting in their endlessly touted 'test kitchen'?

They so often seem to throw up contrived roadblocks that they devalue their results before they've even begun testing. My problem is that they're supposed to deliver the 'best'. To limit their testing to items that are 'widely available', as they so often claim is derelict, vis-à-vis how they position themselves. Availability is a keystroke away. Why are they not testing widely available (via the Net) lines that all but the newest cooks would likely have at least heard of, let alone wondered seriously about. They are in a unique postion to do just that, yet they fail time and again, as they do with their knife testing, pot testing, kitchen tool testing (less often), et al.

CI found themselves with a (figment of their editorial imagination, imo) problem many years ago. For some time CI was advancing their own and their reader's knowledge, turning new and beginning cooks into more comfortable novices. With the advent of the popularity of the cooking shows on TV, which largely became popular because of their accessible (read: vapid) approach to cooking, CI became more like the shows in response, turning off thousands of advance and pro cooks in the process. (The $ is in the new, newer and novice cooks.)

CI is still worth the read for newer or novice cooks, or for those who simply want to see what they're up to. They're better in baking and in some procedural and food science details, okay with some simpler approaches, uninspiring or downright limited in terms of creativity, flavor understanding, combination, or development.

My problem with CI is the same problem I have with the cooking shows, a preponderance of often over-simplified approaches to food and cuisine (so frequently rehashed) that are devoid of real knowledge, experience and understanding. But the big bucks are with beginning cooks and those who only cook vicariously. I have no issue with that, per se, but this approach 'dis-illuminates', if you will, the doors available to open for cooks who want to advance themselves. They are there but few can see them. I get emails all the time from cooks who want to move past being a novice and do not see how to do so. One thing I tell them: relegate CI to the monitoring pile and stop watching the cooking shows. [/rant] http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

J. Todd
12-14-2008, 12:41 PM
To get a good look at some quality cookware, check out your nearest Williams-Sonoma. (Don't necessarily buy from there, as they are very proud of their various lines.) But they carry All-Clad, Calphalon, etc, and sometimes have demonstrations.

j biesinger
12-14-2008, 03:21 PM
The handles and the price are exactly why I didn't buy a large all clad skillet.

I discovered a line of "all clad" pans by j a henckels international (their lesser brand) that are just as heavy in construction as all clad, have a much more ergonomic handle design, and so far, performs exceptionally well, oh and it's half the price of all clad.

since I got the pan I've yet to see them mentioned any where, or reviewed. they seem like great pans, I can't figure out why they're are so obscure.

K Kruger
12-14-2008, 04:14 PM
MetroKitchen (http://www.metrokitchen.com/category/henckels-classic-clad-cookware?gcid=S11992x044&keyword=henckels%20pans&matchtype=search&gclid=CPPj7qGzwZcCFRKLxwod6Hx4cw)carries them, as do several other online merchants.

Your pan is case-in-point. Who better to introduce various manufacturer's wares to new or novice cooks than CI?

I dropped by B&N a couple hours ago to scan the new CI issue to see what pans they chose to review. I jotted them down. They said, "A 12-inch skillet should last a lifetime and cook almost anything. But does quality construction have to cost top dollar?" --but then they didn't test any 'top dollar' pans, claiming that "[m]anufacturers also sell skillets composed of up to seven layers, or with copper cores (the best heat conductor used in cookware), but these high-quality pans usually cost well over $200—more than most of us want to spend on a single pan." Fine. But since they are not testing the actual 'top dollar' pans, why ask the question?

And then this: "We chose seven skillets from leading manufacturers[...]" Oh, really? How many does anyone here recognize as 'leading'? The list:

All-Clad 13-Inch Stainless French Skillet

All-Clad Stainless 12-Inch Fry Pan

Calphalon Contemporary Stainless 12-Inch Omelette Pan

Cuisinart Chef's Classic Stainless 12-Inch Skillet

Gourmet Standard Tri-Ply 12-Inch Skillet

Miu Stainless Steel 12-Inch Open Fry Pan

Weil by Spring, The Healthy Kitchen 12-Inch Fry Pan

My guess is three.

*******************

While and the store I chanced upon James Petersen's latest book, Cooking (http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-James-Peterson/dp/1580087892/thevirtualwerberb), out last year, which I've yet to review. I spent an hour looking it over. Recommended.

Chris S Lewis
12-15-2008, 03:22 AM
And here I thought I found my next pan. I hadn't actually seen the All Clad yet so was unaware of the handle issue. And Kevin is correct, I often simple toss the pan as opposed to using utensils. I've also never seen CI before and was unaware of their poor testing. Again Kevin is correct, I have indeed only heard of 3 of those brands.

Back to the drawing board for me.

K Kruger
12-15-2008, 10:00 AM
If you can get down to the Sur la Table in Freehold (at the mall near the racetrack, or the one on Manhattan) you can check out their pans (the Sur la Table brand) against the All-Clad. (You can also check them against the Demeyere, a SS-clad copper pan). I was able to view and hold SlT's pans when in Santa Barabara a few months ago. Liked them a lot but have not cooked with them.

I do know a few people with All-Clad that like them (they are not pan flippers though). At least if you go somewhere where you can hold a few pans to compare you can get a good idea of what's what.

Jeff E.
12-15-2008, 10:39 AM
I really like my All-Clad pans. I must be an aberration because I am a “pan flipper” and have no problem with the handles or balance issues. I have the 12 and 10 inch skillets, 3 qt. sauté pan, 3 qt. saucier, a couple of sauce pans and a stockpot. One is from their Masterchef line and the rest are either LTD or Stainless.

I find the pans well-balanced, very well made, are easy to clean and maintain a steady, stable cooking temperature. I gave up on Calphalon because they are difficult to keep clean, mostly because of deposits from the hard water we have from the municipal supply. My Calphalon Commercial hard anodized sauté pan warped in a 350 degree oven but it was replaced by the manufacturer under the lifetime warranty. I sold the replacement.

Since it appears everyone has his or her favorite, I would suggest trying to find someone you can borrow one from before making a purchase.

Shawn W
12-15-2008, 10:55 AM
While we are talking about pans here does anyone have an opinion on Calphalon One? Is this 'infused' annodized worth the extra $$?

Side question, it used to be one wasn't supposed to use non-sticks above medium heat or the non-stick would peel. Have they fixed this on newer pans or maybe it's just low end Wal-Mart type non sticks this applies to? I'm really wondering cuz I can't see buying a non stick omlette pan and using it on medium heat. I do pan omlettes really hot.

That's why I have all stainless, much to my chagrin reading the above link about stainless being the worst performing media of common cookware materials, though, this was all acquired years ago.

K Kruger
12-15-2008, 11:09 AM
Cheaper nonsticks do need temp limitations. Calphalon One is safe to 500 (lids to 450); their Contemporary line safe to 450. Cheaper pans usally specify 350 at the top end.

Shawn W
12-15-2008, 02:10 PM
Their product lines are confusing. They seem to have Calphalon One Infused Annodized, and Calphalon One (which is also infused anodized)

According to this Calphalon website comparison (http://www.calphalon.ca/calphalon/consumer/jhtml/cookwareComparison.jhtml), Calphalon One Infused Annodized is safe to ANY oven temp and with any utensils (including metal) and is brolier safe.

So it would be worth something to me ... not come home and have a cow because the kids made scrambled eggs with a metal whisk in my new pan, or be able to use the pan as a broiler pan.

Shawn W
12-15-2008, 05:42 PM
I bought that 10 & 12" Calphalon Contemporary Omlette Pan Limited Time Offer pack, got it at LNT today for $44.10 tax in. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

You wouldn't believe this, but those pans would have cost me $195 from Hudson's Bay (http://www.thebay.com/stores/shop/product/en/bay/10001/0/56153877/56153877) company http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

I think I'm going back to buy some more.

Bryan S
12-15-2008, 06:00 PM
Originally posted by Shawn W:
I bought that 10 & 12" Calphalon Contemporary Omlette Pan Limited Time Offer pack, got it at LNT today for $44.10 tax in. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I think I'm going back to buy some more.

Hey Bud, I love those pans. I just bought another set yesterday for my Brother In Law for a Christmas present. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Shawn W
12-16-2008, 07:43 AM
Wow, first use of the Calphalon pans this morning. unreal

fried back bacon with no butter, the brown, that always sticks to the bottom of my stainless pans even with butter stayed on the back bacon, not on the pan .. the taste was really better

then I fried two eggs together with no butter, over hard

all they needed was a little nudge and they came loose, then I flipped them right in the pan by tossing, first try, all the way over ... brilliant!! lol, I have never done that before ... tried, made a mess, quit

I guess I'll have to see how they hold up but for first impression couldn't be happier!!

j biesinger
12-16-2008, 02:54 PM
all they needed was a little nudge and they came loose, then I flipped them right in the pan by tossing, first try, all the way over ... brilliant!! lol, I have never done that before ... tried, made a mess, quit

teflon is kind of like a knife, when they're new they work like they should, and you got to know when they need to be replaced (or sharpened). A friend of mine refuses to pay for good teflon pans and instead prefers to replace them more frequently.

Shawn W
12-16-2008, 05:00 PM
and instead prefers to replace them more frequently that's been me for a long time ... buy el cheapos, when they start losing their coating chuck em out ... I really hope these last and perform a good long time with care

Paul R
12-18-2008, 12:27 PM
If you want "some" sticking in order to get fond(sp)for deglazing and sauce making is stainless the way to go? Do you get this with hard anodized cookware?

Paul

Jeff E.
12-18-2008, 01:18 PM
Calphalon hard-anodized aluminum is no more non-stick than stainless.

Check out this (http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/cooking-knives/6132-buying-cookware.html) discussion and poll about cookware.

r benash
12-19-2008, 07:38 AM
If you are buying Teflon coated pans, I go with the poster upstream. Buy the cheaper ones and replace when they stop working. You won't find a Teflon coated pan IMHO that will carry a lifetime warranty.

On the other hand the Caphalon and and the All-Clad nonsticks are not Teflon coated. They have their own proprietary coating. Lifetime warranty and higher temp limits. The All-Clad 14" fryer I have came with instructions that said it was ok to use metal implements since it is not a Teflon film/coating.

Dave Hutson
12-31-2008, 05:50 AM
I bought a set of "Emerilware" pans at BBB. They are "clad" (private labeled by All Clad, I believe). For a 10 piece set, they are a great value at under $200. I mostly use cast iron except for saucing, sauteeing, and boiling, so these are quite adequate for my needs. I have 6 cast iron skillets in varying sizes and 6 various dutch ovens! I liked the Emerilware enough , that I bought my college aged daughter a set for her apartment!

RDOwens
12-31-2008, 04:55 PM
I use Jamie Oliver line of stainless. It is made (or at least assembled) by T-Fal, which is a big business in our town. A friend works there and I get discounted price.

I like it. I would prefer All Clad, but hey, you go with what you can afford.

A lot of the stainless I see is really thin. I was in Macy's b4 Christmas and saw a set, forget which, that is thinner than the old Revere stuff I used right out of college in an apartment.

The Oliver stuff has some weight to it. I purchased my mother some a few years ago and she traded me a couple pieces to get smaller pots so she could lift them. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Bryan S
12-31-2008, 04:58 PM
Originally posted by RDOwens:
A lot of the stainless I see is really thin.

The Oliver stuff has some weight to it. I purchased my mother some a few years ago and she traded me a couple pieces to get smaller pots so she could lift them. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Sounds like the Oliver line has the encapsulated bottoms on the pots and pans. I Love encapsulated cookware. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Bill Hays
12-31-2008, 05:58 PM
I like cast iron. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif Someone here turned me onto Griswold .. Can't remember who though .. Well seasoned CI is great but requires more care than the others. Takes some experience, too. I tried to make some (mashed) potato pancakes in my #5 tonight and it was a total disaster! After cleaning, all of my "G" is going through a light seasoning tonight. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Happy New Year !!!

Bill http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/images/wsmsmile8gm.gif

Brandon N.
12-31-2008, 07:01 PM
Hey Bill,

I'm doing a light seasoning "sesh" tonight too. I was in TJ Maxx the other day and the Emeril CI 5-in-1 smoker was $40 so I decided to get it. Man its a beast at 27lbs. I also picked up the #12 Lodge Campfire DO a little while back and thats getting a seasoning too. I learned the last time and stunk up the kitchen seasoning. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

So I filled up the BGE with RO and when it hit 350, put the CI in and went inside for a few minutes to coat some more pieces. While having another Red Hook Blonde Ale, I pegged the therm at 750 http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif. Quick shut down of the vents and we were back around 400. No harm no foul. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Happy New Year!

Bill Hays
12-31-2008, 07:11 PM
Stunk up the kitchen? http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

I like to season at 250 - 300º and then raise to 350º near the end but 750??? Seems like you'd have to start over..

Bill

Brandon N.
12-31-2008, 07:21 PM
It was my fault. I made a not-so-good drippan with the cheap foil and not HD. The drippings started burning.

I didn't see anything wrong with the piece in there so I think I caught it quick enough to save it. Is it better to season at a lower temp? I think Lodge recommends 325-375 for 1 hour.

Bill Hays
12-31-2008, 07:26 PM
Originally posted by Brandon N.:
I caught it quick enough to save it. Is it better to season at a lower temp? I think Lodge recommends 325-375.
Cool http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

I like to season mine at lower temps for a longer time. Think it helps to get the oil/fat into the metals pours more. Raising the temp at the end would "set" it. I could be totally wrong but this seems to be working for me.

Happy New Year !!

Bill

Bryan S
12-31-2008, 07:27 PM
Originally posted by Brandon N.:
I caught it quick enough to save it. Is it better to season at a lower temp? I think Lodge recommends 325-375.
I do all my Griswolds at 350 inverted with foil underneath them to catch the run off. After an hour at 350º i turn the oven off and let them cool inside the oven till at room temp/next day. HTH http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Brandon N.
12-31-2008, 07:31 PM
B- I'd love to get me some Griswold http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I might have to try the lower temps Bill.

Bryan S
12-31-2008, 07:33 PM
Originally posted by Brandon N.:
I might have to try the lower temps Bill.
Season at the temps you cook at. IMO, one of the best ways to season CI is to make a couple batches of french fries in the pans. http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

j biesinger
01-01-2009, 04:53 AM
I like cast iron. Cool Someone here turned me onto Griswold

I love me some Griswold. I inherited some "camping pans" when an older friend moved to florida and gave up camping. It turns out they were griswolds and weren't seasoned (I recall them scrubbing the bejesus out of them after cooking bacon). I seasoned the biggest one, and its always on my cook top. I probably use it 50% of the time.

It amazing, you can almost see your reflection in the shiny blackness. I read something that stated old cast iron is superior to currently produced stuff by companies like Lodge because they don't sandblast the insides any more. Seems like such a simple thing to finish off the interior and make the pan so much more usable, can't figure out why its not done anymore. My guess is that enameled pans fills the niche of high end cast iron now. My Lodge dutch oven interior is almost pebbly.

On a sad note my Griswold has a slight wobble, which is apparent every time I cook on my electric hob. I can't imagine I warped it, but I don't think it's always been there. I was wondering if its possible to grind it flat, but then I'd lose the cool marking on the bottom.