Thinner pizza crust.


 

BillSmith

TVWBB Pro
Since I make 15" pizzas, I did 2x of that dough recipe, per pizza. However after doing it, I think I could have done 1.5x that recipe and still gotten 15". The math was just easier to do 2x, so I did that, last time. I think I will try 1.5x next time.
Do you double the recipe to make dough for one pizza? If so, that’s way too much. My recipe is 5 cups of flour and makes dough for two 15” pizzas. I use sourdough starter instead of yeast.
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
I think I've always done same day doughs, yes. Or at most, the night before.

I think your cold ferment 48 hour technique is what I'm probably missing. How do I do that?

Right now, what I've done is let the dough rise at room temperature for at least 3 hours. Unless it was done the night before.

While I have seen someone make thin pizza thin, using same day dough, I don't mind starting things a few days early. Several things I cook involve some kind of preparation a few days in advance, such as shopping or making marinades or brines.
Basically make your dough and then make your dough balls. Lightly oil the balls and place in a plastic Tupperware with enough room to expand or in a plastic storage bag with the bag just lightly twisted shut.

Put in the fridge for 48 hours, pull out 20-30 min before using.

After 48 hours you can freeze it too.

There are a lot of techniques and methods to making pizza dough, spend some hours reading here
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
This below, 2x, to get 14-15" pizzas.


But as I've also said, any recipe I've done over the past 3+ years, has resulted in the same thickness.

+++++++++

3 1/3 cup flour
1 packet of Yeast

1 tbs sugar

1 tbs salt

1/4 cup wheat flour

mix

add 2 tbs of olive oil while mixing

mix

heat 2 cups of water. Make sure it is warm / hot

add 1.25 cups of water to the dough. Add 1/4 of cup at a time. add until the dough becomes a ball
In pizza making we use weights not measurements, called baker’s percentages.

Are you using a kitchen aid with dough hook? How long are you kneading the dough?
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
Do you double the recipe to make dough for one pizza? If so, that’s way too much. My recipe is 5 cups of flour and makes dough for two 15” pizzas. I use sourdough starter instead of yeast.
5 - 6 cups, yes. I've only been able to get one 15" out of that, maybe because I've never been able to stretch it thinner.
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
Basically make your dough and then make your dough balls. Lightly oil the balls and place in a plastic Tupperware with enough room to expand or in a plastic storage bag with the bag just lightly twisted shut.

Put in the fridge for 48 hours, pull out 20-30 min before using.

After 48 hours you can freeze it too.

There are a lot of techniques and methods to making pizza dough, spend some hours reading here
Thanks. So it sounds like the same process of making dough, I just put it in the fridge for 48 hours.

Should I let it rise at room temperature, before putting it in the fridge? Currently I do that for 2 - 3 hours, until its risen.

And you're saying after all of this, it becomes easier to stretch?

I have read restaurants mention that they ferment dough for 48 hours. I just never knew why.
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
In pizza making we use weights not measurements, called baker’s percentages.

Are you using a kitchen aid with dough hook? How long are you kneading the dough?
Yes I use a food scale to monitor the weights, so I can get consistent results multiple times.

Previous recipes I've used did use weights, I just like this last one more because the texture came out better. But I still do measure everything on my food scale, so I can make sure the cups of dough or water are consistent.

And in the end, I am looking for a certain water to dough percentage, before finally kneading in the kitchen aid.

Yes I'm using a Kitchen Aid with a dough hook.

I knead until it looks well combined, several minutes.

Thanks for your help.
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
Thanks for the prompt responses on Sunday everyone. Sorry I'm a few days late, I saw notifications for other threads, but not this one.
 

Tim Campbell

TVWBB Pro
Question: How important is weight in a rolling pin?
Hmm...there are better bakers out there than me, but you really don't want something overly heavy. Any pressure I apply is from my own arms. Imo, I like this pin much more than a marble one I owned years ago. It's definitely not too light. My wife is an excellent baker and she adores this pin for everything she makes that needs it.
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
Hmm...there are better bakers out there than me, but you really don't want something overly heavy. Any pressure I apply is from my own arms. Imo, I like this pin much more than a marble one I owned years ago. It's definitely not too light. My wife is an excellent baker and she adores this pin for everything she makes that needs it.

Thanks.

I think my current one is either marble, or something similar. I never liked it from the beginning, and have always wanted to replace it.

I'll be replacing it with the one you suggested.
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
Thanks. So it sounds like the same process of making dough, I just put it in the fridge for 48 hours.

Should I let it rise at room temperature, before putting it in the fridge? Currently I do that for 2 - 3 hours, until its risen.

And you're saying after all of this, it becomes easier to stretch?

I have read restaurants mention that they ferment dough for 48 hours. I just never knew why.
No need to let rise at room temp, it will do that in the fridge. Just make sure your fridge is about 38 deg, too cold and you may need 72 hours. Also you can experiment work different ferment times that works for YOUR recipe and equipment
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
Yes I use a food scale to monitor the weights, so I can get consistent results multiple times.

Previous recipes I've used did use weights, I just like this last one more because the texture came out better. But I still do measure everything on my food scale, so I can make sure the cups of dough or water are consistent.

And in the end, I am looking for a certain water to dough percentage, before finally kneading in the kitchen aid.

Yes I'm using a Kitchen Aid with a dough hook.

I knead until it looks well combined, several minutes.

Thanks for your help.
I like about 62% hydration, and start with 65 degree water and it should end up about 80 degrees when the dough is done. You don’t want finished dough temps much more than 80 degrees
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
Here is my go to recipe, use a good bread flour like King Arthur
Dough

Makes 4 skins about 400g for 14” pizzas
Notes: water 65 degrees
Power flour or bread flour,
Water and salt in first, then add flour and yeast. Add oil after shaggy then mix on speed 2 for 6 minutes. Cut and ball and oil right away and into storage bags. Refrigerate for 48 hours
 

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Tony-Chicago

TVWBB All-Star
Here is my go to recipe, use a good bread flour like King Arthur
Dough

Makes 4 skins about 400g for 14” pizzas
Notes: water 65 degrees
Power flour or bread flour,
Water and salt in first, then add flour and yeast. Add oil after shaggy then mix on speed 2 for 6 minutes. Cut and ball and oil right away and into storage bags. Refrigerate for 48 hours
Thank you so much. I have made tens of thousands if pizzas. But my homemade dough ones are not edible....
I will try this.
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
Thank you so much. I have made tens of thousands if pizzas. But my homemade dough ones are not edible....
I will try this.
No problem, that recipe was given to me by Tom the “dough doctor”. Not sure if you know who he is but he is a legend in the pizza and bread industry, he just passed away from Corona.

I assume you are in the pizza industry?
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
Side note: I use a 6 qt kitchens is stand mixer with dough hook

Put water and salt in the bowl, add flour and dry yeast, Turn on mixer to setting 2 and let mix until it all comes together to a shaggy mess. Then add the oil and mix about 6 more minutes until smooth.

If you have a thermopen keep checking dough temps and make sure it doesn’t get over 80 degrees.

Also I use a blackstone pizza oven, it can cook up to 900 but for this dough I run it about 600.

If you are using a home oven and have issues with it not browning enough, you can add a little sugar or some diastatic malt next time.

I use General Mills power flour and it is slightly malted just like King Arthur is, if you are using a home oven bake at 550 or as high as it will go using a stone or a steel
 

Tim Campbell

TVWBB Pro
Side note: I use a 6 qt kitchens is stand mixer with dough hook

Put water and salt in the bowl, add flour and dry yeast, Turn on mixer to setting 2 and let mix until it all comes together to a shaggy mess. Then add the oil and mix about 6 more minutes until smooth.

If you have a thermopen keep checking dough temps and make sure it doesn’t get over 80 degrees.

Also I use a blackstone pizza oven, it can cook up to 900 but for this dough I run it about 600.

If you are using a home oven and have issues with it not browning enough, you can add a little sugar or some diastatic malt next time.

I use General Mills power flour and it is slightly malted just like King Arthur is, if you are using a home oven bake at 550 or as high as it will go using a stone or a steel
Thank you tons for this. I will try it asap. Like Tony, my own doughs leave a lot to be desired. Many thanks
 

George Langley

New member
Just a shot in the dark here, but have you tried adding the yeast after the first mixing and letting the dough rest covered for 20 mins or so, then adding the yeast to the dough and mixing till the dough clears the bowl. I have read somewhere that adding the salt too early inhibits the yeast growth.
 

 

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