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Summit E6 Questions


 

Jeff Boudman

TVWBB Wizard
I have been using a WSM 18 for years and bought a 22 for larger cooks. I am not really a fan of the 22 and looking into the E6 and have some questions.
Is it fairly easy to set a cooking temperature with the E6?
Is the E6 good for long cooks?
Approximately, how much charcoal is needed for a long cook of 10-15 hours?
Thanks, Jeff
 

TimA

TVWBB Super Fan
Yep, very easy to set temp. Think opposite of kettle, and choke it down.

I always leave the charcoal grate at its lowest level, and just fill the bottom up with charcoal. That’s enough for well north of 16 hours
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
When using briqs for long cooks, I’ve liked the B&B Charlogs and have used KPro. I prefer the Charlogs over KPro for flavor and burn rate. While I used to use KPro in my WSM 18, I likely won’t be buying it anymore as I’ve come to really like and enjoy JD XL.

The KPro had a horrific black smoke at startup and leave massive residue once burned. I’ve just come to like something else. YMMV.

I use my charbaskets in the lower coal grate position and have filled them up and placed some additional briqs between the charbaskets to ensure I had enough fuel for a brisket.

If you’re running low and slow, which I’m assuming is 250° for your cook, I’d estimate loading up around 2 of the large Weber chimneys and you should be fine.

One full chimney is enough to overflow two Weber charbaskets

Recco is to light 10-15 coals and place them atop the unlit coals.

The same amounts apply to JD XL lump coal. I prefer the cleaner burn and flavor it provides. It’s a very clean smoke and you can add fruitwoods to add additional flavor. And it leaves almost zero residue.
 

Grant Cunningham

TVWBB Super Fan
I have been using a WSM 18 for years and bought a 22 for larger cooks. I am not really a fan of the 22 and looking into the E6 and have some questions.
Is it fairly easy to set a cooking temperature with the E6?
Is the E6 good for long cooks?
Approximately, how much charcoal is needed for a long cook of 10-15 hours?
Thanks, Jeff
Just to chime in:

1) Yes. Holds temps very steady over a long period of time, regardless of the weather.
2) Superb for long cooks. And short ones. Seriously, it will do everything pretty darn well.
3) Depends on your charcoal. I use Cowboy briquets, which I feel are far superior to anything made by Kingsford or Royal Oak; 2 full chimneys will easily run 10 hours (or more, depending on ambient temps.) 3 chimneys will give you a huge safety margin, and you can just reuse the unburnt briquettes (and there will be a lot of those!)

When I light my coals for a long burn, I just use a propane torch and light 3-4 briquettes on the edge of the pile. Alternatively, you can put a firestarter block on the edge and light that. Allow 45-60 minutes to come to temp and stabilize, then put your meats on.
 

Richard Garcia

TVWBB All-Star
I am not really a fan of the 22 and looking into the E6 and have some questions.
I
Here in Costa Rica a new Weber Performer Deluxe 22"(WPD) cost me $550 in January, 2020 and the Weber E-6 sold for around $1500.

My excellent WPD meets all my present BBQ Grilling needs along-side of my WSM 18" Classic which leads me to question, "the why", on your above comment on not being a fan of the 22?

However, What does attract me to the E-6 is the Better Ease of Temperature Control and added Grill Space. If I could afford-it I would buy a E-6 in a heart-beat as I am a fan of almost ALL Weber Products;)
 
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Darren Lebner

TVWBB Pro
When our old 22 kettle has had its last breath (bottom half is riddled with heat fatigue holes), I will be considering an E-6 as its replacement.
 

DanHoo

TVWBB Emerald Member
How many cooks have you done on the WSM 22? What is it you are not a fan of?

I'm curious as I've been looking at replacing my pellet with either a WSM 22 or possibly and E6. I already have a large BGE, and the limitation of it is size due to the 18 inch grate.

I think space is the main advantage for the WSM 22 over the E6 is space. How large are your "large cooks" ?
 

GrantT

TVWBB Super Fan
I have been using a WSM 18 for years and bought a 22 for larger cooks. I am not really a fan of the 22 and looking into the E6 and have some questions.
Is it fairly easy to set a cooking temperature with the E6?
Is the E6 good for long cooks?
Approximately, how much charcoal is needed for a long cook of 10-15 hours?
Thanks, Jeff

Yes, temperature management (once you learn the charcoal and vent setup) is very easy...though I still purchased a temperature controller for those extra-long and overnight cooks. Just extra insurance and added remote monitoring and control etc.

The E6 is AMAZING for long cooks....how long are you looking at? 18 hours on a single load of lump charcoal or briquettes long enough? I would say this is roughly 1/2 a bag of charcoal?
 

Jeff Boudman

TVWBB Wizard
I think the original post is in reference to a WSM 22 and not a kettle or a performer.

@Jeff Boudman can you confirm?
You’re correct-WSM 22
How many cooks have you done on the WSM 22? What is it you are not a fan of?

I'm curious as I've been looking at replacing my pellet with either a WSM 22 or possibly and E6. I already have a large BGE, and the limitation of it is size due to the 18 inch grate.

I think space is the main advantage for the WSM 22 over the E6 is space. How large are your "large cooks" ?
I’ve done three cooks of 3 butts.
I used my last bag of B&B Competition the first cook and thought it would run like my 18. The temperature rose much quicker than my 18 and It took several hours to get below 300’. That was my fault. I think the OEM door contributed to the high temperatures. The butts were very good and there was charcoal leftover.
My ACE didn’t have any B&B in stock so I used Blues Hog briquettes for my second cook. I replaced the OEM door with a Cajun Bandit door. The temperature went to 300’ quickly and settled in at 290’. The butts turned out very good and there was charcoal leftover.
I did my third cook Saturday and used KBB. I thought that might rise slower to a lower temperature It did but it also dropped in temperature and turned to ash before all three butts were done. I pulled the finished one and foiled the one that was close to being done and put it back on the WSM. I finished the third butt in the oven until it was ready.
I was aggravated when I started this thread. I think the 22 is well made. It definitely holds temperatures very well. I think I can make a few changes to slow the temperature rise and keep it at 275’ or less. Also, my local ACE has B&B Competition back in stock and I ordered some for pickup this week.
I’m still considering the E6 down the road.
 

Grant Cunningham

TVWBB Super Fan
I see the E6 is 111 pounds. How difficult is it to assemble and what tools are needed?
Thanks, Jeff
The heaviest piece is the lid, which comes fully assembled and is the last thing to go on after the bowl and stand are completely assembled. The other individual parts aren't that heavy.

Assembly isn't terribly difficult; you'll need a phillips screwdriver, and they provide a small wrench (which is a POS — better to use a real one, if you have it.) I had no problem handling the entire job by myself, though (IIRC) they recommend 2 people.

The instructions are quite good. The only thing they don't tell you is that the casters don't easily push in — you'll need a small hammer and a block of wood to get them fully seated in the legs.
 

Jeff Boudman

TVWBB Wizard
The heaviest piece is the lid, which comes fully assembled and is the last thing to go on after the bowl and stand are completely assembled. The other individual parts aren't that heavy.

Assembly isn't terribly difficult; you'll need a phillips screwdriver, and they provide a small wrench (which is a POS — better to use a real one, if you have it.) I had no problem handling the entire job by myself, though (IIRC) they recommend 2 people.

The instructions are quite good. The only thing they don't tell you is that the casters don't easily push in — you'll need a small hammer and a block of wood to get them fully seated in the legs.
Thanks!
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Guru
The heaviest piece is the lid, which comes fully assembled and is the last thing to go on after the bowl and stand are completely assembled. The other individual parts aren't that heavy.

Assembly isn't terribly difficult; you'll need a phillips screwdriver, and they provide a small wrench (which is a POS — better to use a real one, if you have it.) I had no problem handling the entire job by myself, though (IIRC) they recommend 2 people.

The instructions are quite good. The only thing they don't tell you is that the casters don't easily push in — you'll need a small hammer and a block of wood to get them fully seated in the legs.
My 21 year old built it perfectly and without issues. And yes, seating the wheel caster post into the plastic leg block took substantial down force to fully lock and engage it. I used brut weight and down pressure. Successful after a little struggle and some imprints into my hand.
 

GrantT

TVWBB Super Fan
I see the E6 is 111 pounds. How difficult is it to assemble and what tools are needed?
Thanks, Jeff

As a support, download the BILT app on your phone. Additional step-by-step instructions.

My #1 suggestion for assembly though...when you do the lid/hinge, it is CRITICAL that everything is seated naturally and everything aligns (bolts, holes etc). Don't over-tighten anything, and tighten all bolts evenly and slowly. Make sure the lid stays centered and even/level.

Every complaint I have seen about the lid leaking has because it was not properly and carefully installed.

IMPORTANT!! Do not throw away the hinge safety bolts either. If you ever want to disassemble, move etc, you may want them again.
 

 

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