New Q2200 owner with Griddle question


 

Joe Anshien

TVWBB Guru
Q1200 = 189 sq.in. cooking area, 8.5k burner, 8500/189 = 45BTU/sq.in
Q2200 = 280 sq.in., 12k burner, 12,000/280 = 43BTU/sq.in.
Q3200 = 468 sq.in., 21.7k burner, 21,700/468 = 46BTU/sq.in.

Larger grill = larger surface area for heat loss. The Q1200 is the hot rod of the 3.

By comparison, the BM P3 is 695sq.in., 40k burners, 40,000/695 = 58BTU/sq.in.
Weber Genesis 1/2/3/4/5 = 507sq.in., 35k burner, 35,000/507 = 69BTU/sq.in.
Weber Genesis Silver B/C = 507sq.in., 48k burner, 48,000/507 = 95BTU/sq.in.

For Ian to get 58BTU/sq.in. out of a Q2200, he would need a 16k burner, or about 33% more oomph.
I Just looked up my Razor:
  • 20,000 BTU / 318 sq in Pre-Seasoned Griddle = 63BTU/sq.in. So it beats out all but the Genesis line. But also remember that with a dedicated griddle you don't have to take apart your greasy grill to put it on and have direct access to flames. Also I believe the flames are much closer to the griddle improving performance and you have discrete zoning.
  • I am not big on device sprawl and really wanted a griddle add-on to work but after trying multiple options I like a dedicated folding one the best so far.
 

DanHoo

TVWBB Wizard
Weber Genesis 1/2/3/4/5 = 507sq.in., 35k burner, 35,000/507 = 69BTU/sq.in.
Weber Genesis Silver B/C = 507sq.in., 48k burner, 48,000/507 = 95BTU/sq.in.

The main grill area of a Gen 1-5, Silver B/C is more like 420 sq. in. Perhaps the 507 sq. in. icludes the warming tray?
I can't read the tags on any of my silver B's, but I thought they were 36,000 BTU.

If these numbers are right then the BTU/sq in is 83.3 for the Gen1-5 and 85.7 for the Silver B
 

Bill F in Ontario

TVWBB Member
The main grill area of a Gen 1-5, Silver B/C is more like 420 sq. in. Perhaps the 507 sq. in. icludes the warming tray?
I can't read the tags on any of my silver B's, but I thought they were 36,000 BTU.

If these numbers are right then the BTU/sq in is 83.3 for the Gen1-5 and 85.7 for the Silver B
Your right Gen 1-5 and Silver B/C is 420 sq. in. because the grate size for both Gen 1-5 and Silver B/C is 17.5" x 23.8" =416.5" add gaps between grates and firebox would make it approx. 420 size sq. inches .
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Guru
The main grill area of a Gen 1-5, Silver B/C is more like 420 sq. in. Perhaps the 507 sq. in. icludes the warming tray?
I can't read the tags on any of my silver B's, but I thought they were 36,000 BTU.

If these numbers are right then the BTU/sq in is 83.3 for the Gen1-5 and 85.7 for the Silver B
It's just one metric as a quick way to classify grills, kind of like how the horsepower-to-weight ratio of a car says nothing about the way the car handles or goes around corners or its top speed. That 507sq.in. number I picked off a google search, it could be more or less. The 35k and 48k numbers came right off the ID tags on my grills.

The point to be made is that the Qs are designed primarily to be compact and trying to make a pot belly stove out of one (which is essentially what you are doing with a full-size griddle) may not be a good idea for a cast aluminum product. But when people make up their minds they are going to do something all you can do is take a couple of steps back and hold their beer while they do it.
 

Joe Anshien

TVWBB Guru
I am personally bummed that you scarred Ian off of this. The melting point of Aluminum is 1220°. Plus once the griddle gets up to temp you almost always have the lid up to cook. The whole idea of BBQ and grillin' is to play with fire, using food as an excuse;-)
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Guru
The melting point of Aluminum is 1220
I think you are talking about pure aluminum, not aluminum alloy, which is likely different. I'd wager the Qs are an alloy, but regardless, at what temp does aluminum alloy soften and lose its shape (rhetorical question)? I think you have straightened some bowed Qs...don't you ever wonder how they got like that?

I am personally bummed that you scarred Ian off of this. The melting point of Aluminum is 1220°. Plus once the griddle gets up to temp you almost always have the lid up to cook. The whole idea of BBQ and grillin' is to play with fire, using food as an excuse;-)
It wasn't my intent to dissuade him from doing anything, and I don't think I could dissuade someone who was he!!-bent on doing something. I'm glad Ian was able to cancel the order and maybe take a step back and do a little more research. I'm sure he could coax some more heat out of his Q, but I don't think he would ever be truly happy with the performance, and at some point it becomes throwing good money after bad. I'm not the guy that laughs when someone takes a fall on the ice, either.
 

Ian-Kentucky

TVWBB Member
The good money after bad is already behind me... LOL. I've already spent enough trying to make this a good griddle that I could have bought the little 17" Blackstone as well.. I was leery of the maintenance required of the carbon steel surface as I've not had much luck with cast iron or carbon steel pans in the past. This Q functions well as a burger/hotdog/brat cooking device and I'll leave it as such. It just doesn't crisp bacon or sear steak with authority.

On a side note, I talked to a fellow at work with the 17" Blackstone and he says it is bad for a hot spot in the middle and doesn't do well at keeping the peripheral areas hot. He also says it's easy to overload the griddle and having the temps plummet... also not good if there's a breeze, so even if I had bought the little one, I would be struggling with the same temperature problems as I have with this Q.

Thanks for heading me off. I have a tendency to "fix" things till they're broke. :LOL:
 

DanHoo

TVWBB Wizard
It's just one metric as a quick way to classify grills, kind of like how the horsepower-to-weight ratio of a car says nothing about the way the car handles or goes around corners or its top speed. That 507sq.in. number I picked off a google search, it could be more or less. The 35k and 48k numbers came right off the ID tags on my grills.

The point to be made is that the Qs are designed primarily to be compact and trying to make a pot belly stove out of one (which is essentially what you are doing with a full-size griddle) may not be a good idea for a cast aluminum product. But when people make up their minds they are going to do something all you can do is take a couple of steps back and hold their beer while they do it.
I like the BTU per square inch as a way to measure these.

I just measured my E330 and it's 19.5x26 ( 507 sq. in. )
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Guru
The good money after bad is already behind me... LOL. I've already spent enough trying to make this a good griddle that I could have bought the little 17" Blackstone as well.. I was leery of the maintenance required of the carbon steel surface as I've not had much luck with cast iron or carbon steel pans in the past. This Q functions well as a burger/hotdog/brat cooking device and I'll leave it as such. It just doesn't crisp bacon or sear steak with authority.

On a side note, I talked to a fellow at work with the 17" Blackstone and he says it is bad for a hot spot in the middle and doesn't do well at keeping the peripheral areas hot. He also says it's easy to overload the griddle and having the temps plummet... also not good if there's a breeze, so even if I had bought the little one, I would be struggling with the same temperature problems as I have with this Q.

Thanks for heading me off. I have a tendency to "fix" things till they're broke. :LOL:
I'd give you two thumbs up if I could, Ian! Thanks for being gracious!
 

Joe Anshien

TVWBB Guru
The good money after bad is already behind me... LOL. I've already spent enough trying to make this a good griddle that I could have bought the little 17" Blackstone as well.. I was leery of the maintenance required of the carbon steel surface as I've not had much luck with cast iron or carbon steel pans in the past. This Q functions well as a burger/hotdog/brat cooking device and I'll leave it as such. It just doesn't crisp bacon or sear steak with authority.

On a side note, I talked to a fellow at work with the 17" Blackstone and he says it is bad for a hot spot in the middle and doesn't do well at keeping the peripheral areas hot. He also says it's easy to overload the griddle and having the temps plummet... also not good if there's a breeze, so even if I had bought the little one, I would be struggling with the same temperature problems as I have with this Q.

Thanks for heading me off. I have a tendency to "fix" things till they're broke. :LOL:
I think even for a small griddle that you would want at least a 2 burner so you can zone. I pre-heat with both on high and then turn one side to low during the cook to put stuff that is cooked to stay warm and not over cook. I think it gives you a lot more flexibility plus I like the room.
 

Ian-Kentucky

TVWBB Member
I think even for a small griddle that you would want at least a 2 burner so you can zone. I pre-heat with both on high and then turn one side to low during the cook to put stuff that is cooked to stay warm and not over cook. I think it gives you a lot more flexibility plus I like the room.
I think I read someplace that you can wrap half the burner in aluminum foil to create an indirect zone on these, but I don't know how well that would work.

Edit... maybe I just need to spend some more quality time with this appliance. I used my buddy heater adapter hose to attach a 20lb tank instead of the 1lb tank. It's presently 43 degrees outside according to alexa. No wind. To be clear, still the stock regulator.
 

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Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Guru
I have a Camp Chef 2-burner outdoor range that we bought at Costco years and years ago that I use to start my charcoal that would work well for that, I think. But I do have the dreaded device sprawl you were talking about earlier because it's hard to find one device that does everything well, but it's ok...my wife gave up on me decades ago.
 
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Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Guru
Ian, when you have time, have a read here. Lots of good info. Be sure to read post #7, too. Regulator problems with Qs are common, why? Maybe this is why.

 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I am personally bummed that you scarred Ian off of this. The melting point of Aluminum is 1220°. Plus once the griddle gets up to temp you almost always have the lid up to cook. The whole idea of BBQ and grillin' is to play with fire, using food as an excuse;-)
Joe, the Q grill frame will melt down before the cook box aluminum will melt. Ask me how I know?
 

Ed Pinnell

TVWBB Guru
Joe, the Q grill frame will melt down before the cook box aluminum will melt. Ask me how I know?
Now this I gotta hear!!! Was it anything like the last flaming video you posted??? How on Earth did you do that?

{All respect and props, Bruce!]

EDIT: I hope this wasn't the Q that is mounted on the deck!
 
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Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Ed, I had a regulator on it that was advertised as a low pressure regulator for grills. I ignored several reviews saying it ran hot. I put it on a Q200 and forgot to turn off the gas one night after I left it on to clean the grates. By the next day, the bolts on the grill that attach to the stand had sunk down about 3/4" into the plastic. I could not even get screwdriver on them any longer and had to basically break the stand off the grill.
The Q200 would get well over 600 and even on low was hard to keep under 400.
 

Ian-Kentucky

TVWBB Member
Ian, when you have time, have a read here. Lots of good info. Be sure to read post #7, too. Regulator problems with Qs are common, why? Maybe this is why.

Yep, I spotted that thread early on. I only skimmed through it, but remembered to slowly open it to avoid latching the safety valve.. This adapter hose is a buddy heater brand and supposedly doesn't have the oil problem, but I'll install the filter I have between the hose and the grill anyway just for an added guard against that.

thanks,
Ian
 

 

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