High Heat Brisket Method - A Compilation


 

Mark_C

New member
Hey Tom:

I don't know how just a flat will turn out using the high heat method. The method, as outlined, requires a whole packer (point and flat together). These are usually available at your butcher, or even Costco/Sams. These are usually around 12 lbs and more like $2-$3 a pound.

I don't want to say "don't even bother with just the flat"... but I'm tempted!

- Mark
 

MKEvenson

TVWBB Wizard
The HH method works with whatever size meat you want to cook. Just have to make timing adjustments. Go fer it!!!!!!!!

Mark
 

DaleW

TVWBB Pro
My schedule doesn't allow me to visit this board very often anymore, and when I do I'm usually looking for something specific. I just wanted to pop in and give encouragement to anyone who has been thinking about giving this technique a try but hasn't got around to it yet. I smoked 2 briskets on my 22.5 on July 4 using pretty much Chris' excellently documented high heat cook as a guide. I placed one on the upper rack, one on lower, then switched when I foiled them. I used Kevin's rub suggested for tri tip. And I used Steve's No. 5 Sauce with the drippings added as recommended. I have to say it might be the best meat of any type I have ever cooked in any manner. So if you're waiting, get with it!
Sorry, I didn't get pictures, but I do have witnesses!
 

M Getty

New member
I'm sure this has been discussed in depth somewhere and I'm just missing it, but I figured bumping this thread might be better than starting a new one.

I'm doing my first HH brisket on Saturday. I'm pretty sure I'll get put out to the couch if I don't come with some burnt ends. My question, after I remove the point and foil the flat, with the temps reaching >350, is there a suggested time for the point to cook? Is there a specific internal temp, feel, or look that indicates the point needs to come off?

TIA

Marc
 

K Kruger

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I am not a burnt ends fan so rarely do them, but when I need to I do not remove the point from the flat before foiling. I cook the brisket till done, then remove the point and return it to the cooker. At that point I choke the vents so the temps eventually drop some, cook the point longer, chop and pan with a soupçon of sauce, and finish.

You can remove the point if you prefer, sooner. Do note that it will not have the foil protection so be careful of temps over 350 for an extended period (I tend to run 375 or higher after foiling), especially if you have sugar(s) in the rub. No specific internal; cook till the fat has rendered well, chop/chunk, then finish.
 

M Getty

New member
Originally posted by K Kruger:
I am not a burnt ends fan so rarely do them, but when I need to I do not remove the point from the flat before foiling. I cook the brisket till done, then remove the point and return it to the cooker. At that point I choke the vents so the temps eventually drop some, cook the point longer, chop and pan with a soupçon of sauce, and finish.

You can remove the point if you prefer, sooner. Do note that it will not have the foil protection so be careful of temps over 350 for an extended period (I tend to run 375 or higher after foiling), especially if you have sugar(s) in the rub. No specific internal; cook till the fat has rendered well, chop/chunk, then finish.

It was my initial thought to finish it whole, remove the point, choke the cooker, and throw the point back on, but this being my first HH, I wanted to follow the OP as closely as possible.

I appreciate your input and will give it a go.
 

K Kruger

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I don't know about the OP. But since it's your first don't separate till after the brisker is done and restmin, tented, for ten min. Serve the brisket ten to fifteen min later.
 

M Getty

New member
Originally posted by K Kruger:
I don't know about the OP. But since it's your first don't separate till after the brisker is done and restmin, tented, for ten min. Serve the brisket ten to fifteen min later.

I'll do it.

Thanks.
 

K Kruger

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Toss with rub, sauce or thinned sauce (my preference - and not very much) and continue till the rub and/or sauce has caramelized and tightened. (To me, burnt ends should not be saucy in the least.)
 

RodneyS

TVWBB Member
I know this thread hasn't been touched in a while, but did want to say thanks to all who contributed. I cooked a 13 pound packer on the 26" with temps running from 350-400 on Christmas eve.
It was SO GOOD, and so easy! Took about 5 hours. I used firebricks to section off about 1/3 of the charcoal grate for coals. Used Stubbs for the first time and relly liked them. (Was also cooking a shoulder at the same time on the WSM and Temps held the best ever on both ).
I placed a large foil pan on the charcoal grate under the brisket with a foil under it and going up the side of the bricks.
Started with about 20 partially lit charcoals on top. And about 4 fist full size chunks of cherry.

I used Kruger's paste, without the onion, and BIG BAD BEEF RUB from Amazing Ribs website.

Big hit with family on both sides, will definitely make it again.


Thanks everyone for your help!
 

Scooter B

TVWBB Pro
Well as much as I love sharing sucesses, I thought i would share a bit of a failure to hopefully prevent others from my oversight.

Biggest mistake was thermometer placement.. i forgot to put in thermometer when first loading so about an hour in I had to open up and quickly get it in... the error (that i didn't notice)was that i was mostly into the point section. As a result I left it run FAR too long prior to foiling. I didn't put 2 and 2 together when my internal temp stalled before 160F.

Another thing i will change was the foil pan I used. I used one almost the whole upper grate and i feel it really restricted the airflow.

All this and yet I still love the HH method. This one is on me and not the method!
 

NealT

TVWBB Member
Let me say that I'm a brisket newbie and have only done about 5 or 6 on my WSM.

Tried my first HH yesterday.

Put on the meat at 3:15pm. Something was weird with my thermometers. Took over an hour for temps to roughly stabilize. The grate thermometer read about 325-350 but the lid thermometer was low (maybe around 275). Propped the door open a bit to get the heat higher and that seemed to work (grate=375'ish and lid at about 325-350).

5:45pm: meat temp ranged from 164-170 in multiple places. Decided it was time to place in a foil roasting plan and covered with foil. Cooking temp appeared to spike a bit to 425 at the grate (maybe due to opening the lid to foil the meat).

7:30pm: probed with a fork for tenderness and it seemed ready (like butter).

Then came the crucial mistake: I tried to firm up the bark so I put the unfoiled meat back on for 30 minutes (set my timer) but received a phone call so I didn't pull it off until about 40 minutes. I think the grate temp shot up and the ends were overdone and the middle was dry.

After removing the brisket, I then took the point to make burnt ends. Closed off all the bottom vents to bring the temp down from grate temp of 400 to 240 (after about 30 minutes)

Left the point on for another 3 hours and that was too long. Too crispy on some parts.

The taste of the flat was a bit...."chemical". I wonder if the temp didn't get hot enough before I put on the meat.

Overall, I think the method would have worked if I pulled off the brisket after the fork probe and not have attempted the bark firming/burnt ends steps.
 

K Kruger

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
If you are going to firm the bark (I don't bother as crisp bark on a brisket is not something I look for) it should only take a few minutes (maybe 7-10 tops) at high temps.

I load the meat as soon as I pour the lit (about 24 coals) on the unlit. Never had a chemical taste. Maybe it was the fuel, maybe the wood.
 

NealT

TVWBB Member
Doh! I'll try 5 minutes next time when I want to firm up the bark. She keeps telling me "DON'T OVERDUE THE BRISKET!!!" so I'll listen to her
icon_smile.gif


Been using Kingsford but maybe I need to let the chimney get to the "white coal" stage. They may have been at the "mostly gray" when I put it on the unlit coals.

Thanks for the tips, Kevin.
 

Dave Ables

New member
Need a little help here. This went great for me, but I noticed the end result was a texture that was kind of "Pot-roastish" Is this normal? I haven't eaten a lot of brisket, but have enjoyed what I have. I'm wondering if I did something wrong. Maybe foiled too long or too early?
 

K Kruger

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
My first guess would be rested too long, especially if wrapped in foil. How did you rest and for how long?
 

Monty House

TVWBB Pro
Is there a downside to me not using Minion if I have two chimneys, e.g., with roughly a single layer of unlit on the bottom, two heaping lit chimneys fill the ring (and then some).

With no water in the pan, I start out 350+ plus, and I believe from experience that that amount of charcoal--both lit & unlit--would easily keep me at target temp for 5+ hours.

Thoughts?
 

Sully

New member
I finally got brave and did a high-heat brisket yesterday. Thought I'd give my blow by blow to help convince other first-timers to give it a go:

14 pound packer from Sams @ $2.38 a pound. Did a little trimming, then put on Kevin's Paste Rub and a fairly standard homemade dry rub the night before.

I was antsy all morning thinking I needed to get the charcoal going, but managed to hold off till 11am. I used the Minion Method with a few handfuls of hickory and applewood chips. I foil wrapped the water bowl with a double layer, separated by a few balls of foil to create an air space as suggested by the original poster.
Put the meat on right outta the fridge, fat side down, while the smoker was still warming up. My temps got up to 350-375. Propped the door open at first, but quickly found I didn't need it. It was 105 degrees out and in the sun. (heck, I might not have needed charcoal at all).
Took about 3 hours to hit 170. I took it off, found I couldn't wedge it into the foil pan I had, so I foil wrapped it (fat side down still) and placed it on top the pan so I wouldn't lose any juice.
I continued to follow the temps, but as the OP said, it was not a reliable number. Indeed, the temps quickly shot up and were over 200 within an hour. Based on a fork probe, I decided I was close at about 90 minutes. I unwrapped it and put it back on the open fire to firm up the bark for about 30 more minutes.

It was off the fire at about 5:30pm. I foil wrapped it with some of the drippings and put it in a cooler to rest. Finally sliced it at 7pm. Served it with Steve's No. 5 Sauce with the remainder of the de-fatted drippings mixed in.

Tell you what, it was hands down the best meat I've ever cooked. Don't think I'll ever do the overnight method again. My buddies who are all avid cooks were shocked this beast of a brisket could get so tender, so fast. My only advice is to try it for yourself.
I thank all the prior posters on this thread especially Kevin Kruger for his feedback over the 2 years this thread had been alive!

-Sully

brisketon.jpg


Brisketdone.jpg
 

 

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