Brisket recipe

Chris G.

TVWBB Member
Due to request, I am posting my brisket recipe.

It is rather involved, but it is tweaked to produce the most tender, juicy, and tasty brisket ever.

Here it is for all to enjoy...

Start with 1 whole (attached flat and point) untrimmed ("Packers Cut") large (9-14 lbs.) beef brisket. Do not use pre-packaged brisket or trimmed brisket.

STAGE 1:
Mix the following as marinade:

3 cups of red wine
1 cup of white vinegar
1 cup apple juice
1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons garlic salt
2 tablespoons onion salt
1 tablespoon black pepper

Place brisket in a non-reactive pan, and pour marinade over meat. Cover and refrigerate for 8 hours. (If meat isn't totally submerged in marinade, either make more, or flip brisket half way through.)

STAGE 2:
Remove brisket from refrigerator and marinade, and let stand to room temperature. (2 hours)

Mix the following as a rub stage:
1/3 cup paprika
4 tablespoons garlic salt
2 tablespoons onion salt
2 tablespoons black pepper
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1-1/2 teaspoons white pepper
1 teaspoon cumin

Remove middle and top sections of the Weber Smoker, and start 12-15 lbs of good charcoal in the bottom as directed. Leave bottom vents open.

Using a basting brush, coat the entire brisket with yellow mustard, and heavily dust with the rub.

Once all the charcoal is gray, add about 6-8 pieces of Mesquite wood, about the size of small baseballs, with all bark removed. Allow wood to fully catch fire, and assemble the smoker.

Add 3 quarts of cold water to the water pan, close bottom vents, and close the lid. You made use the top vent to temper the temperature down to 210 F, but open the top vent fully at that point, and leave fully open for the rest of the cooking procedure.

Place brisket on lower rack WITH FAT SIDE UP. Cook at 210 F for 1 hour per pound, strictly regulating the temperature using the bottom vents. Keep lid on at all times, and do not exceed 220 F.

STAGE 3:
Mix the following as a liquid stage:

2 cups apple juice
1/2 cup grape juice

Place liquid stage in a spray bottle, and baste brisket every 2 hours during cooking time.

Be sure to check water pan every few hours, and add hot water as needed.

STAGE 4:
Remove brisket from smoker, and place on two (doubled) large pieces of aluminum foil, with the edges turned up. Add remaining liquid stage to brisket, and wrap tightly.

Return to top rack of smoker, and cook for 4 hours (at same temperature, 210-220*F.

STAGE 5:
Remove brisket from smoker, and remove from foil.

Return to top rack of smoker, and cook for 2 hours.

STAGE 6:
Remove from smoker, and let stand for 20 minutes before serving. Slice against the grain and serve stacked high on buns, or pulled with your favorite sauce. Goes good with baked beans, and cole slaw.
 

Tom Raveret

TVWBB Pro
have you noticed what temprature you seem to take the brisket off the smokeris it the same each time??

do you modify the recipie for doing two briskets at the same time?
 

Chris G.

TVWBB Member
Tom,

Target temp for stage 5 is about 205 internal. Of course, the time will vary a little from piece to piece.

And yes...I have found it takes about 50% longer to do two briskets.
 

Steve Amidei

New member
Chris,

This sounds awesome and if the results are anything like the 3-stage competition baby-back recipe you posted, I cannot wait to try it (just need a full weekend to dedicate to my first brisket).

Anyway, seems like it's going to be a very long cook - figure a 10 pound brisket will be something like 16 hours total... do you recommend the use the minion method or just add Kingsford as necessary (would you add more smoke wood too?)

One last question - what "type" (vinegar, tomato, etc) of sauce would you say would go best with this recipe?

Thanks!
Steady
 

Chris G.

TVWBB Member
Thanks for the compliments Steve!


A 10# brisket will probably go about 12 hours. But again, ambiet temp, wind, ect., will all effect the final time.

And no offence to the minion method, but I will never advise to cook over unlit charcoal, and never will.

I have never found a need to add fuel to the WSM. With about an hour or so of burn per pound, and the WSM able to hold about 20lbs, I have never found the need to add fuel.

I eat my brisket plain on a bun, but a vinegar based sauce called Brothers BBQ sauce is real good (light) on the side. It can be found on the web, but Im sure your favorite sauce will do.

Good luck, and let us know how it turns out!
 

Chris G.

TVWBB Member
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dave Schwartz:
Chris, all the local Sam's Club had was 6-7lb brisket flats. Will they work out ok on the WSM?
Thanks.

Dave <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hey Dave.

Yes they will work fine, but I believe they are trimmed pretty tight. If they dont have a fat cap, fully cover the top with bacon. This will simulate a fat cap, and keep the brisket tender.

Good luck!
 

Mark G.

New member
I've got a 5 pound brisket from CostCo with a nice fat cap. Will I still follow the same times as your 9-14 pound brisket or will it be cut in half? When all is said and done, what should my internal temp be when it's falling apart tender? I've heard everything from 175-205.
Thanks! I can't wait to try this!
 

Richard Batey

TVWBB Fan
Chris G. - I used your brisket recipe last night on a packer using your stage 1 & 2 (marinade & rub). Came out great. Tender, moist, and tasty. I'll use that recipe again.

Thanks.

Richard
 
G

Guest

Guest
Chris - I just wanted to post that I tried this recipe out yesterday as my "first light" for my new WSM. I've never had a brisket before, so I nothing to compare it to, but I will say it was very tender, juicy, and more importantly... good.


Thanks for the post!

Brian
 

Mike

New member
i have this soaking in the marinade right now. ill get it going in the morning. i could only get a 7.7lb flat from the butcher. ill share the results. this is my fisrt brisket. wish me luck.
 

Mike

New member
Meat came out tender and juicy. one thing i did notice was a strong vinegar taste. vinegar is not my cup of tea but it was good.
 

Harvey K

TVWBB Member
In your recipe you advise to start by putting the briskett on the bottom rack, so my question is how long should I leave it on the bottom rack before foiling it and then moving it to the top rack.
For example if I get a 10 pound briskett I should cook it for 10 hours total time. 4 hours on the lower rack and then I should foil it for 4 hours and place it on the upper rack. And then remove from the foil and place on the top rack for an additional 2 hours.
I am new to this so I just want to make sure I totally understand before starting it. I thought this receipe sounded pretty good so I plan on using this receipe saturday.
I have used your rib receipe and plan on using that one again in the future so thumbs up on that one.
Well I went ahead and made the briskett saturday and did a 9.2 pounder following the above times, except it took some extra time for a total of 11 1/2 hours. It turned out good and I will use this receipe again so another thumbs up on this one.
 

Stu M.

TVWBB Fan
Don't mean to change the subject a little, but I did a high temp #10.45 packer yesterday that turned out great and fast. Cook time time was 3 1/2 hrs (3p-630pm),foiled at 165, finished back on WSM, then I let it rest for two hrs. Cooked at 325-345.

Too me flats tend to dry out during low & slow, (no fat to self baste & juices cook out quickly) so I usually do all my flats at high temp.
 

John Horton

TVWBB Member
Chris, Can't wait to try your recipe. Mine tend to dry out like an old women as soon as I cut it, but the flavor is good. How do I keep it moist? I've been using vac packed 4-5 pound flats that I rub and store in the fridge for at least 8 hours before smoking on the WSM for 12 hrs. Am I just overcooking or what do you think? Any of you expertise would be appreciated.
 

Paul K

TVWBB Guru
Keith,

I have reservations about the cooking method. For one thing, Chris doesn't recommend the Minion Method, rather he urges one to completely light all of the charcoal before putting the meat on.
I have never found a need to add fuel to the WSM. With about an hour or so of burn per pound, and the WSM able to hold about 20lbs, I have never found the need to add fuel.
I can't see a charcoal ring of fully lit briquettes or lump burning for over 16 hours much less 10. On the other hand, the Minion Method can easily do that.

With regards to the technique offered, here are the areas I have reservations with:

From Step 2)
Cook at 210 F for 1 hour per pound, strictly regulating the temperature using the bottom vents.
Say you have a 10 lb brisket; then that's 10 hrs of smoking (so far).

From Step 4) foiling the brisket:
Return to top rack of smoker, and cook for 4 hours (at same temperature, 210-220*F.
You now have the brisket smoking for 14 hrs, and 4 of those are foiled (yikes!)

From Step 5)
Return to top rack of smoker, and cook for 2 hours.
Another 2 hrs smoking, now unwrapped. 16 hrs total.

No mention of testing for tenderness. Brisket is done when it is just tender (IMO). Test it with a probe or fork; the instrument should slide right in with no resistance. I would think 16 hrs cooking that includes 4 hrs foiled would yield over cooked brisket big time.

I recommend you try a traditional process such as this or a high heat method like this.

Paul
 
Thanks for the info. I was in Ace Hardware today drooling over the 18.5 WSM.

Once I get authorization from the Office of Home Finance and Happiness, I will make the purchase.

As for the whole minion method debate, (CAUTION: NEW GUY QUESTION) Does this work as well with simply using all wood or lump?
 

timothy

TVWBB Hall of Fame
Originally posted by Keith "Spatulaman" James:
Thanks for the info. I was in Ace Hardware today drooling over the 18.5 WSM.

Once I get authorization from the Office of Home Finance and Happiness, I will make the purchase.

As for the whole minion method debate, (CAUTION: NEW GUY QUESTION) Does this work as well with simply using all wood or lump?
Lots of info here
 

Top