Jaccard? Yes, please.


 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB All-Star
If you're in the market for a meat tenderizer or just need a way to destress after a long work week, this tool is worth picking up.

I used it on my Char Siu recipe to reduce the time I was spending to make 1,000 holes in the pork to promote better marinade penetration.

And believe you me, this thing is a miracle worker. It made tenderizing VERY easy and actually fun. And it made real quick work of what used to take a few minutes and near-misses of my fingers to get the job done.

Cleanup was pretty easy too when done and I'm sure I'll find more uses for this in the near future.


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C Lewis

TVWBB Pro
I thought that I read somewhere that this pushes the E.coli and such deep down into the meat where it can't be killed unless it's cooked beyond well?
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB All-Star
I thought that I read somewhere that this pushes the E.coli and such deep down into the meat where it can't be killed unless it's cooked beyond well?

  • Use a food thermometer to make sure meat has reached a safe minimum cooking temperature:
    • Cook ground beef, pork, and lamb to an internal temperature of at least 160°F (70°C). The best way to check the temperature of patties is to insert the thermometer from the side until it reaches the center.
    • Cook steaks and roasts of beef to an internal temperature of at least 145°F (62.6°C) and allow the meat to rest for 3 minutes after you remove it from the grill or stove. Check the temperature in the thickest part of steaks or roasts.
i wouldn't use this on steaks as i don't marinate steaks (NY or ribeye; just dry brine them with kosher salt).

i would use this on sliced chuck steaks if i'm making "cheap" beef tacos but those are sliced like 1/4" thick then seared.

my char siu was cooked to 155 on this last cook and then i let it rest for 10 mins before slicing. BUT i had the butt, in chunks, in the freezer for a few weeks.

either way, i'm not overly worried at e-coli at home.
 

 

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