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View Full Version : Red Beans and Rice w/Andouille



K Kruger
01-14-2012, 05:59 PM
I based my recipe on the red beans and rice I had served to me at Buddy Holmes Soul Food, in New Orleans, back in the late 70s. Holmes used a bit sweeter wine than I do. Your choice.


Red Beans and Rice with Andouille

1 lb dry small red beans, picked over

1 bottle cheap Riesling (get a cheap one from Calif)


Place the beans in a large bowl, add 3 cups of the wine. If necessary, add water to cover by one inch. Allow to soak overnight. Reserve the remaining wine.



2 med onions, chopped finely or diced

1/2 cup finely chopped celery

1/2 cup finely chopped red bell pepper

1/2 cup finely chopped green bell pepper

6 cloves garlic, minced

1 bunch scallions, white parts thinly sliced, the remainder reserved

2 smoked ham hocks

1 teaspoon dry thyme

2 bay leaves

1 pound andouille sausage, quartered lengthwise then casing removed, then sliced crosswise into quarter-inch slices

salt and white pepper to taste


Cornbread, for serving

A good hot sauce, preferably from Louisiana (I like Pepperdoux's here), for serving

Hot cooked rice, for serving



Soak the beans overnight, as noted. Drain well then add to a large bean pot or Dutch oven. Add 2 quarts water to cover, the onion, celery, bell peppers and scallions slices, the garlic, thyme and bay leaves, the ham hocks and the sausage.

Bring to a boil then reduce the heat. Partially cover. Simmer a couple or three hours. Add a little of the reserved wine and an equal amount of water, as needed, to keep the solids in the pot just covered with liquid. Taste the broth and add salt and white pepper.

Continue cooking till the beans are fully tender.

Remove the ham hocks and cool; reserve for another use if desired*, or discard. Remove the bay leaves and discard.

Stir well then remove about 2 cups of the pot's contents to a small bowl. Purée well with a handblender. (Alternatively, remove 2 cups to a blender or processor and purée.) Stir the purée into the pot.

Adjust seasoning.

Slice the reserved scallion greens thinly.

Serve over hot rice with the scallion greens sprinkled on top, with cornbread and hot sauce on the side.



Kevin



* I remove the skin from the hocks, trim out the nuggets of meat and mince the meat finely. This I add to my cornbread batter.

Tim Y
01-14-2012, 09:47 PM
When I fix red beans & rice, I like to cook the andouille into the mix as well.....
But when I was in New Orleans this last summer, I had this dish at two places & both served the sausage on the side.....
Anybody from New Orleans with an opinion on the technique of this dish?
I think cooking the sausage with the beans adds more flavor, but apparently there is a tradition to having it on the side.
Just wondering....thanks.

K Kruger
01-14-2012, 10:41 PM
I eat much more often at Cajun places rather than Creole in La but it's frequently cooked and served with both, i.e., the andouille is cooked in the beans (either cut small as I do above, or cut into rounds) and a section of an andouille link is split and grilled or pan fried and served alongside or on top of the beans.

In many places where I eat it (mostly Cajun country: Opelousas, Houma, Breaux Bridge, Lafayette, Port Barre, Grosse Tete), 'red beans and rice' is red beans with the andouille cooked in, but 'red beans and rice with sausage' means you get that - plus the additional grilled or fried sausage.

James N
01-14-2012, 11:19 PM
Kevin do you prefere one type of rice over another with this dish?

K Kruger
01-15-2012, 09:21 AM
james- Yes, it's one of the few times I want white rice, specifically American, and preferably from La or Ark. The rice I used yesterday was a 'regular' long grain from Calif. Perfectly suitable.

James N
01-15-2012, 03:08 PM
Kevin thank's for your responce...Red Beans & Rice is on my to do list .

r benash
01-16-2012, 04:57 AM
DO is in the oven to slow cook. Brought to a boil going to temp the oven down to where it's simmering very slowly and walk away for a few hours.

Minor note at this point is that I could have just dumped the whole bottle of wine in. Don't think whats left from the bottle would have mattered. At least tasting the beans before they went into the mix. I'm using small red kidneys so maybe they take more water than the traditional Southern pinks. Hey, it was in the pantry so decided to use them. Didn't want to use a pound of the pink beans I like to keep for Santa Maria style pink beans.

Granddaughter was born this morning so need to go to the hospital and take a look see http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/images/wsmsmile8gm.gif

Thanks for the tips Kevin, we'll see if I even get to the corn bread and rice http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

K Kruger
01-16-2012, 08:27 AM
Kidneys are larger than the small reds. Sure, you could have dumped the whole bottle in.

r benash
01-17-2012, 04:23 AM
Great balance in this recipe. Next time I'll get some southern reds but small red beans (kidneys) were excellent.

We just had a bowl of the beans and corn bread as we were running in and out, will have some with rice today.

Flavor was great, didn't need to touch anything really. I did tweak a little instead of doing the puree step (I'll do that next time).

I separated a quart of liquid from the cook at the end, made a roux with some butter and flour (browned a bit) and used that to thicken. I liked the texture of the meat pulled from the hocks and everything else so figured I would try this first. Made it easier as we were running about.

I'll puree a bit of it today and blend that back in just to see how it changes things with the rice.

Great recipe - definitely on the standards list now.

K Kruger
01-17-2012, 06:46 AM
Good. I'm glad you liked it.

Small red beans are not the same as kidneys. They are a bit smoother in texture, not quite as mealy. Try them.

r benash
01-17-2012, 02:18 PM
More than like it http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Had a chance today to do it right. I took bit of the bean mix and pureed per the recipe and blended it back in then reheated on low heat to bring it up slow. I took some of the reserved Andoulie and just carmelized it a bit in a pan to heat it through. Made some rice and chopped up the greens I saved from yesterday.

One "word" wow.

The balance is just spot on. There's nothing I would change.

I do like the idea of using it as I did yesterday a little looser as a thick soup.

Completing the recipe as posted requires no change unless you want to IMHO.

I did a buttermilk corn bread yesterday cause it was quick. It didn't have the hock meat or cracklins in it but it's a favorite one and worked well.

Thanks again - the "red beans and rice with sausage today was fantastic". Next time I'll get more diligent and use the southern reds, but have to say the little red kidneys were pretty good.

Only thing I will add with the last of it now is the hot sauce. I like things "hot" but wanted to taste it plain first. Got my favorite pepper sauce/s at the ready for the rest of it http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Ethan G
01-21-2012, 04:19 AM
This looks great Kevin! One quick question, not sure that this makes a difference or not....when making red beans and rice, I've cooked the beans in one pot, then in the dutch oven rendered the sausage and cooked the vegetables/garlic in the sausage fat, then added the cooked/cooking beans and liquid into the dutch oven. I noticed you didn't saute the vegetables before adding everything together. Would that make a difference either way? Thanks for the recipe.

K Kruger
01-21-2012, 08:02 AM
I would not cook the beans separately. I'm looking to infuse flavor into the beans.

I don't sauté the sausage to render the fat. Its flavors permeate the mixture when all are included together for cooking.

While in most things I do I sauté or at least sweat the aromatics first I don't here - simply to cut the time. One certainly could. I think the relative volume of aromatics to the rest of the ingredients (as well as the sausage flavor being already full) is not substantial enough to make it a must-do thing.

For caramelized meat flavors, split a piece of sausage and sauté, then serve with the beans.

In typical red bean formulations - those that are served at numerous restaurants in Louisiana, neither aromatics (except for garlic) nor spice blend seasoning (like Tony Chachere's - how I can't stand that stuff! - or the like) are used. Just thyme and bay. The flavor comes from the meat/bone, sausage and garlic additions to the pot - period. (This was Buster Holmes version as well - the wine soak, meat and sausage and garlic with thyme and bay, but no other vegs nor seasoning.) I find this lacking so I add the minced vegs.

r benash
01-21-2012, 11:19 AM
The recipe does work as is, I had similar questions but figured the andouille was the primary note, second was the smoked hocks. The beans get a nice, subtle infusion with the wine soak which is very nice.

The aromatics are a second/third in the levels of flavor. I don't think that a saute would have changed or improved in any significant way. They were noticeable and totally infused though. The longish cook gives them plenty of time to do their magic.

I think I have maybe a cup of the recipe left, made two complete platings today for Marianne and I as a nice full lunch before going out to shovel snow.

I'll second that the split and carmelized sausage on the side completes the whole deal. I just split it and weighted it in a pan while I was warming up the other components. It totally seals the whole thing having that on the plate with the corn bread, rice, scallion greens and a bit of favorite hot sauce.

I can't say enough how much I and others that have had the complete plating enjoyed this.

Only thing I might try with them next time as a tweak is maybe fresh thyme and fresh bay just to see if it brightens things up a tad, but that's just meddling IMHO and not required IE, not a "fix" but a personal tweak just to see what it bumps.

I had a third hock that I cooked along the way towards the end and used it today as I ran out of sausage for the side. It was stored with the leftover. I just pulled it and there was enough meat to complete two platings.

This recipe as left overs is one that just gets better.

My daughter and Son In Law loved the beans, cornbread that I left with them. I was not finished per say. They ate it as a thick bean soup just with the cornbread and are asking for the recipe. It's very good that way on its own thickened with the browned roux.

K Kruger
01-21-2012, 12:26 PM
Something I realized in reading your comments is that I've never shared my recipe before - though I've cooked it many, many times. I featured it peridically on a menu at a Miami Beach restaurant I exec-cheffed back in, oh, 1987, and another MB restaurant in, probably, '89. But I've not shared the recipe before with anyone, least of all people who, you know, actually cook, so your comments are appreciated.

I have made it with fresh thyme and fresh bay, one or the other or both. As both herbs dry rather well the difference using fresh is what you'd expect: there but not remarkable. In restaurants I cooked with both dry but garnished with a fresh thyme sprig, a worthwhile touch, imo.

Tim Y
01-23-2012, 01:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">In many places where I eat it (mostly Cajun country: Opelousas, Houma, Breaux Bridge, Lafayette, Port Barre, Grosse Tete), 'red beans and rice' is red beans with the andouille cooked in, but 'red beans and rice with sausage' means you get that - plus the additional grilled or fried sausage. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Kevin, would you mind sharing some of your favorite places to eat in this area? I may find myself in that part of the country later this year & would appreciate any recommendations.

Thanks

K McCarthy
01-25-2012, 09:52 AM
Would this freeze well? I'm concerned the beans would loose their consistency.

Kev

K Kruger
01-25-2012, 10:10 AM
Tim--

Off the top of my head (if you go let me know and i can dig up others): King's in Port Barre on Hwy 190 about 5 or 6 miles east of I-49; The Boudin Shop, Exit 115 off of I-10 in Breaux Bridge (just north of the exit, next to Landry's); Wayne Jacob's on 5th St (the 700 block) in LaPlace. Wayne Jacob's is a smokehouse and restaurant. They make their own andouille. Unlike most places their andouille is not cured so it's different. Quite good. Wayne Jacob's should not be confused with Jacob's on Airline, also in LaPlace. (They sell cured andouille - it's good - along with tasso, etc. Get some Pepperdoux hot sauce if you go as it's not available out of the area (Wayne Jacob's should have it if you go down there).

Kev--

Freezes pretty well. Vac-packing is best but if you go the container route, press a piece of plastic wrap down on yop of the beans before placing the lid on and freezing.

Tim Y
01-25-2012, 01:02 PM
Thanks, Kevin!! Much appreciated!

K McCarthy
01-25-2012, 02:55 PM
Thank you!

Kev

Tim Y
02-07-2012, 11:49 AM
Tried this recipe last night (finally) and it turned out very good. A keeper.
The only thing I question is the soaking of the beans in wine. I did so (for about 8 hours), and could tell no difference in the finished dish (as compared to what has been my main recipe for RB&R I've used in the past, which is without a wine soak). Perhaps they needed longer?
I ended up putting in the whole bottle of wine into the soak because very little was left after measuring out three cups.
In hindsight, next time perhaps I'll just soak the beans in water, and use the wine as part of the cooking liquid. This recipe caught my eye because of the addition of wine, which in my mind I can see as a tasty addition to this dish.
I found I did not have to add any liquid at all during the cook, so I'm thinking this may be the way to go for what I'm envisioning.
The recipe I've been using has a few more (albeit non-traditional) additions as far as herbs and spices are concerned, but I do think the simpler mix of thyme, bay, white pepper and salt is more in line with the flavor profile of the RB&R I enjoyed while in New Orleans.
Anyhow, great recipe!!!

Thanks

K Kruger
02-07-2012, 03:10 PM
Soak longer. The beans should completely (or nearly so) absorb the wine. The flavor is definitely there.

r benash
02-08-2012, 04:18 AM
I will just use the whole bottle during the soak next time. The flavor note was there in my end result/experiment with the recipe.

It's not prominent in the finished dish though. A subtle note. There are a lot of other flavors at play - most of them stronger.

It will also depend on the wine used - if you want a more prominent note I would suggest using something stronger. Even if it deviates from the recipe - heck make it yours http://tvwbb.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Hmm, wonder what a nice porter or hoppy IPA would do...

Tim Y
02-08-2012, 02:11 PM
Hmm, wonder what a nice porter or hoppy IPA would do...

Funny you say that, Ray, because my recipe for RB&R uses beer as part of the cooking liquid. I usually use a lager, but I can see where your thoughts would fit in.
I never thought of wine...just one of those things...that's why this recipe caught my eye...still, quite a good recipe and the results were very good regardless of the short soak....next time I'll soak longer and maybe add some wine afterwards as well.

K Kruger
02-08-2012, 03:15 PM
I use beer in frijoles borrachos (http://tvwbb.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/5290021414/m/6380045234?r=6380045234#6380045234), which I also make with andouille. Spicing is different of course.

Chris in Louisiana
02-26-2012, 09:35 AM
[quote]Originally posted by james n:
Kevin do you prefere one type of rice over another with this dish?[quote]

My wife makes a great pot of red beans. We like ours with Zatarain's parboiled rice. It doesn't stick together, so each grain is separate and fluffy.

http://shop.zatarains.com/images/7142908130.jpg

John Sp
09-13-2012, 07:31 AM
When I fix red beans & rice, I like to cook the andouille into the mix as well.....
But when I was in New Orleans this last summer, I had this dish at two places & both served the sausage on the side.....
Anybody from New Orleans with an opinion on the technique of this dish?
I think cooking the sausage with the beans adds more flavor, but apparently there is a tradition to having it on the side.
Just wondering....thanks.

Tim,

I live in the New Orleans area and I say why limit yourself? I do both. I add sausage (cut crosswise into coins) to the red beans about 45 min before the end of cooking and roast some sausage in the over to serve on the side of the plated dish...

Regards,

John

D M Sattelberg
11-18-2012, 07:59 PM
Made this tonight....followed it as described, and turned out awesome. I like a little more spice, so added some cayenne pepper and some Texas Pete hot sauce.... Thanks Kevin for sharing... Great for a winter dinner...

r benash
01-07-2013, 07:30 AM
Made this again yesterday - Thanks Kevin for a great recipe.

I made some minor changes this time around.

Left out the green bell and doubled the red.
Added a little more celery as I like that more than green bell for flavor.
The wine soak is key. Half absorbed overnight this time so used the "bean wine" along with water for additional liquid before cooking down.
Used Dartagnon andouille this time, spendy but excellent, no need to remove the skin. Flaovred and aged nicely.
I also added a 3rd hock. After all cooked through I break down the hock meat and added it directly to the bean mix.
Small red beans are definitely better (flavor/texture)

I also simmered some additional andouille links (fresh andouille) early on in the mix and pulled them when cooked through.
They made a great lunch/side. I just poked them with a knife in a couple places is all.

Just incredibly good as originally written though! It's quickly become a favorite.

And everything fits perfect in the #9 DO.

Michelle in New Orleans
10-13-2013, 09:57 PM
When I fix red beans & rice, I like to cook the andouille into the mix as well.....
But when I was in New Orleans this last summer, I had this dish at two places & both served the sausage on the side.....
Anybody from New Orleans with an opinion on the technique of this dish?
I think cooking the sausage with the beans adds more flavor, but apparently there is a tradition to having it on the side.
Just wondering....thanks.

Lots of older people think if you DO insist on using sausage, that you not cook it with the beans but rather cook and serve on the side as the beans have a better flaor. Once I read this many years ago (I'm born and raised in N.O.), I tried it and I have to agree. Real Creole beans do not contain sausage. I make mine with a smoked pork shank. I've got no problem serving sausage on the side, but I never cook the sausage with the beans!

Michelle in New Orleans
10-13-2013, 09:59 PM
based my recipe on the red beans and rice I had served to me at Buddy Holmes Soul Food, in New Orleans, back in the late 70s. Holmes used a bit sweeter wine than I do. Your choice.

I think the place you're thinking of was called Buster Holmes.

Michelle in New Orleans
10-13-2013, 10:14 PM
I've not pre-soaked beans of any type for many a year. I don't even do the "quick soak" method often shown on the bag of red beans. Not soaking extends the cooking time only by about 10 to 15 minutes so it's unnecessary as far as things go. I NEVER make beans without a ham bone or without smoked ham shanks (not hocks) that I started seeing in the store about 2 years ago, which was great as I try to avoid baking a ham in the oven here in N.O. in the summer -- it's too darn hot. Even though we adore andouille, we usually use only smoked sausage on the side (tastes so much better if the sausage is not cooked with the beans, as weird as this may sound).

r benash
10-14-2013, 04:48 AM
Always good to have notes on regional tradition - thanks for posting. I definitely get the "sausage on the side" though and how it can change up the authentic dish. Either way I'm eating it and like this recipe :-)

In general, not to associate directly to "authentic N.O. red beans and rice" I treat the beans depending on what I want to do. Sometimes I pre-soak, quick soak, wine soak, pressure cooker, etc. I don't have an "all or nothing" kind of method. Depends on what I'm doing. I do have to say though that wine soaking beans adds a really nice touch/flavor IMHO. Not specific to any recipe though.

John Bridgman
10-27-2013, 12:26 PM
I always assumed the reason for serving sausage on the side rather than mixed in was that a lot of these dishes were made on a budget and "unlimited sausage" was not an option**. For a given amount of sausage you get a lot more taste if you serve on the side (or add to the beans at the last minute) rather than cooking it with the beans.

** now that I've said it that way, unlimited sausage doesn't sound like a great idea from a health POV either :D

Chris in Louisiana
01-24-2014, 04:43 PM
We put a little sausage in early to let it flavor the beans as they slow cook, but we find that it can leave the sausage mushy with little flavor left in it after a long, slow, simmer. We save most of the sausage and add it in the last 30 minutes or so.

Tip. Put a jar of Pace Picante sauce in the beans. It sounds crazy, but it adds a lot of good, subtle, flavors. I discovered this when I was in school and trying to jazz up the canned Blue Runner brand beans. It worked, so I carried it over to real beans when I started cooking.

John Sp
02-19-2014, 01:10 PM
When I fix red beans & rice, I like to cook the andouille into the mix as well.....
But when I was in New Orleans this last summer, I had this dish at two places & both served the sausage on the side.....
Anybody from New Orleans with an opinion on the technique of this dish?
I think cooking the sausage with the beans adds more flavor, but apparently there is a tradition to having it on the side.
Just wondering....thanks.

Tim I do both. I typically render the sausage and hocks for a few minutes to gain enough fat to sauté the trinity. I remove the sausage and hocks, sauté the trinity, and return the hocks before adding my beans and liquids. About an hour before the end of the cook - I add the sausage pieces back in. If the RBR is to be a main dish, I roast some sausage links (I like Manda Smoked) to serve along side. If the RBR is to be a side dish I usually don't serve any sausage on the side...

Regards,

John

John Sp
02-19-2014, 01:17 PM
Always good to have notes on regional tradition - thanks for posting. I definitely get the "sausage on the side" though and how it can change up the authentic dish. Either way I'm eating it and like this recipe :-)

In general, not to associate directly to "authentic N.O. red beans and rice" I treat the beans depending on what I want to do. Sometimes I pre-soak, quick soak, wine soak, pressure cooker, etc. I don't have an "all or nothing" kind of method. Depends on what I'm doing. I do have to say though that wine soaking beans adds a really nice touch/flavor IMHO. Not specific to any recipe though.

Ray,

One of the things that makes NOLA great is the diversity we share. We have so many cultural traditions that blend into our lives (our cooking, our conversations, our music, our faith, etc.) that the end results of nearly everything is better. There is no one 'right way' to cook RBR (or almost any other local cuisine). Enjoy them the way you and your family like them!

Regards,

John

r benash
02-20-2014, 05:19 AM
Hey John - you strike true. Now, if I could only find consistently good andouille... the version I used in last recipe a couple weeks ago was bought in a pinch during the snowstorm, so not going to do that Smithfield stuff again. It wasn't horrible, but it was fairly tasteless and didn't add the flavoring in the end. All of my other sources were out unfortunately. I probably need to just keep some in the freezer.

John Sp
02-20-2014, 10:56 AM
Ray,

Sometimes I buy meat (Boudin, Andoulli, & Smoked Sausage) from Don's Specialty Meats (http://donsspecialtymeats.com/)in Scott, LA. They make a good quality product and it is priced pretty reasonably IMO (a bit more than the grocery). I drive through there on business a few times a year and stock up. I keep the meat in the freezer until I get the urge. You can order sausage from them and have it shipped FedEx. This might be an option for you. I prefer smoked sausage (especially alligator sausage) in my RBR but Andoulli is good too (whatever paddles your pirogue buddy)...

Regards,

John

r benash
02-20-2014, 02:52 PM
I think I can probably get good stuff from a local grass feed beef, lamb, goat provider that I have used for belly, beef and pork lately. Need to check with them. I have found really good results from shipping from out of state providers but thing is - is the shipping. If I can't find a good source would definitely take these folks up, so thanks for the pointer.

Wait do you mean pirogue or perogie :-)