What is everyone's favorite charcoal?


 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Pro
Cowboy is an American company, but production is in Mexico.
i emailed them directly on this exact question and their reply was USA for Country of Origin for Cowboy Natural Hardwood briqs.

their parent co is Duraflame and they have multiple locations in the USA and Mexico but these briqs are USA sourced and produced.
 

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Darryl - swazies

TVWBB All-Star
I used one of my bags of KJ big chunks of lump last night.
I liked it very much, appears to work like Jealous Devil but I need a few more cooks on it.
Same price around here for both I think so no advantage. also have to get to the bottom of the bag to see if its better or worse than JD.
 

MikeLucky

TVWBB Pro
I guess I'm just a philistine. Lol.

I buy KBB, B&B, and even some Royal Oak here and there. I get briquettes and lump. I have a decent sized plastic tub and I just dump whatever I have, regardless of brand and/or medium, into the tub and mix together. Then when it's time to grill I scoop the chimney in there to fill it up, I light the coals until they are hot, then I cook meat over or near them. Eat the meat, then repeat as necessary. And, believe it or not there hasn't been a single comment from one single person ever eating my grilled food wondering about the charcoal brand/type/price. Just saying. Oh, and I have some mesquite pellets that I will toss a handful of on the burning coals for that little kiss of smoke flavor.

Some things don't need to be very difficult, and my opinion is that cooking meat with burning coals is one of those things.
 

Jason Godard

TVWBB Fan
I thought I liked Cowboy briquets as they burn for a long time, but I could smell an ‘off‘ smell, kind of earthy or like burnt dirt. So it was no surprise to hear that they use clay as a binder. Lots of grit in the ash. I’m leaning towards lump after trying Rockwood, Basques Sugar Maple, BnB, and Cowboy lump. Cleaner burn, less ash, and with the exception Basques, burned at least as hot as briquettes, just not as long.
 

JimK

TVWBB Olympian
I posted somewhere on this site over a year ago about some Prime 6 charcoal I purchased. I never got around to trying it until this week. It's a very different animal than what I'm used to. Very slow to light, but once it's going, it's nice and hot, with very steady temps. Absolutely no smoke when lighting and very little ash.

 

Rick Poch

TVWBB Fan
I thought I liked Cowboy briquets as they burn for a long time, but I could smell an ‘off‘ smell, kind of earthy or like burnt dirt. So it was no surprise to hear that they use clay as a binder. Lots of grit in the ash. I’m leaning towards lump after trying Rockwood, Basques Sugar Maple, BnB, and Cowboy lump. Cleaner burn, less ash, and with the exception Basques, burned at least as hot as briquettes, just not as long.
That's odd.
According to a few sites that I've read, the hardwood briquettes contain "95% hardwood & 5% vegetable binder"
I'll have to agree to disagree about the Cowboy lump.
It's crap. Lot's of small pieces, or overly large chunks and and stuff that's not wood. I've found rocks, chunks of what looked like cut lumber and even a nail in a bag.
The BnB lump is vastly superior to Cowboy lump.
 

Cee El

TVWBB Super Fan
I guess I'm just a philistine. Lol.

I buy KBB, B&B, and even some Royal Oak here and there. I get briquettes and lump. I have a decent sized plastic tub and I just dump whatever I have, regardless of brand and/or medium, into the tub and mix together. Then when it's time to grill I scoop the chimney in there to fill it up, I light the coals until they are hot, then I cook meat over or near them. Eat the meat, then repeat as necessary. And, believe it or not there hasn't been a single comment from one single person ever eating my grilled food wondering about the charcoal brand/type/price. Just saying. Oh, and I have some mesquite pellets that I will toss a handful of on the burning coals for that little kiss of smoke flavor.

Some things don't need to be very difficult, and my opinion is that cooking meat with burning coals is one of those things.
I think the tub idea is wonderful, with the mixture of the coals and flavors.
 

 

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