Weber 26'' Kettle and scaffolding grill cart

Charles D

New member
Hi All,
New here and new to Weber grilling. After doing a little research, I knew I wanted a Weber 26''. Also, I wanted a portable grill table with a solid cover. I have plenty of space, but in Florida everything rusts.

So, here is what I did:
1. order the Weber 26''
2. Order scaffolding from walmart (I can provide details on which kind if needed). I knew the scaffolding would work size wise, cause I uses a set for storage already.
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3. Painted the scaffolding black with spray on high temp grill spray. This was a mistake cause it scrateches and shows the yellow easily. Bu I just touch up as needed.

4. inserted the kettle. no bracing required but I chose to sink one screw in a secured board just to be needed. The Kettle seats on the metal framing with no adjustments required.
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5. Cut up an old cedar water bed headboard to create a table.
6. Used the a metal rod to become a support for a light roof
7. Used a metal screen door frame to support a light, aluminum (tin?) roof.
8. Made the front of roof adjustable for tilting purposes.
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9. Added a screen to help with the sun.
10. Added lighting.
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Done

I did this 4 weeks ago and it has worked perfect for smoking and grilling every weekend. Even worked through a Florida downpour last weekend during 12 hour beef brisket smoking.
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Sam Bee

TVWBB All-Star
For your first post Charles that is spectacular! Nice work! What kind of scaffolding did you order from Walmart? I would like to do something like that for my 26er. I like the idea of not having to drill the kettle bowl.
 

Stefan H

TVWBB Wizard
That is a cool idea. Never thought about that. That scaffolding provides the base for a roof. How high is the scaffolding?
 

Kevin L (NKY)

TVWBB Wizard
That is a very cool idea, i really like the tilting roof idea that can be handy anywhere. you have a good sized work surface room for storage under neath and it can move easily. SWEET, now actions shots please.
 

timothy

TVWBB Hall of Fame
What a neat idea! That's what we call a baker scaffold. I have two in my garage, one for a rolling storage unit and the other is a rolling miter saw/workbench.
We use those everyday on the jobsite, and I'm gonna share your pics with the crew.:cool:

Tim
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
One question now that I look at it again, why leave the legs on? Seems like something to just bash a shin against at just the wrong minute.
Sometimes I am just confusing!
 

Charles D

New member
2 Reasons for the legs: 1) I'll lose them in my clutter. 4 garages, 1 workshop, 3 storage sheds...so best place to keep them is attached. 2) This whole assembly can be deconstructed in 2 mins. Nothing is attached permanently. I can lift the grill out by removing one screw (hand tightened). The boards that make the table sit on the lip of the bakers scaffolding. The roof has a continuous rod attached with nuts on each side. So, disassemble is easy, but it is all tight and secure at the same time.
 

Charles D

New member
no shin bashing cause the legs sit inside of the scaffolding. Currently, I attached a little rack (using an above ground pool ladder and zip ties) from the legs to the opposite side of the scaffolding for storage.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB Hall of Fame
I understand the storage issue sure as you’re born! I have ten pounds of stuff in a five pound garage! The added advantage of having them still attached for times when the rig needs to be disassembled makes a lot of sense as well!
Very cool.
 

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