Thinner pizza crust.


 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
It’s a professional flour sold in bulk, my local Costco business center carries it for $17/50lbs. It has a protein of 13.5% and I usually split a bag with a friend.


I currently have Arrowhead Mills organic all purpose flour.

Should I use that, or something with 13.5%? And if the latter, is there something in the 5lb. - 10lb. range you recommend?
 

Rich G

TVWBB Diamond Member
@Arun L., I'd probably use a Bread Flour, rather than AP to mimic the recipe. Your AP flour is about 10% protein (or less).....most American bread flours are between 12-13%. I'd go with King Arthur or Gold Medal (the latter is lower than the former when it comes to protein.)

R
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
@Arun L., I'd probably use a Bread Flour, rather than AP to mimic the recipe. Your AP flour is about 10% protein (or less).....most American bread flours are between 12-13%. I'd go with King Arthur or Gold Medal (the latter is lower than the former when it comes to protein.)

R

Thanks, this is reasonably easy to find, I think I've bought it before within the past few years.
 

Len Dennis

TVWBB Diamond Member
@Arun L., I'd probably use a Bread Flour, rather than AP to mimic the recipe. Your AP flour is about 10% protein (or less).....most American bread flours are between 12-13%. I'd go with King Arthur or Gold Medal (the latter is lower than the former when it comes to protein.)

R
Thanks, this is reasonably easy to find, I think I've bought it before within the past few years.
Actually, not quite true: American AP flour has much less protein than Canadian flour:

All-Purpose Flour – A blend of hard and soft wheat; it may be bleached or unbleached. It is usually translated as “plain flour.” All-Purpose Flour has 8% to 11% protein (gluten). All-purpose flour is one of the most commonly used and readily accessible flour in the United States. Flour that is bleached naturally as it ages is labeled “unbleached,” while chemically treated flour is labeled “bleached.” Bleached flour has less protein than unbleached. Bleached is best for pie crusts, cookies, quick breads, pancakes and waffles. Use unbleached flour for yeast breads.

Bread Flour – Is white flour made from hard, high-protein wheat. It has more gluten strength and protein content than all-purpose flour. It is unbleached and sometimes conditioned with ascorbic acid, which increases volume and creates better texture. Bread flour has 12% to 14% protein (gluten). This is the best choice for yeast products.

Canadian: Avoid brands like Martha White and White Lily when making your Canadian recipes. They contain about 9%-10% protein. Look for unbleached all-purpose flour instead, a brand like Gold Medal, Pillsbury or King Arthur, that contains about 12%-13% protein, the equivalent of all-purpose Canadian flour.
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
Thanks. Any ideas on what tool I could use to cut the logs into 2 or 3 pieces? And can someone link to a hardware store where I can get that device?
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
@Arun L., I'd probably use a Bread Flour, rather than AP to mimic the recipe. Your AP flour is about 10% protein (or less).....most American bread flours are between 12-13%. I'd go with King Arthur or Gold Medal (the latter is lower than the former when it comes to protein.)

R
I bought the King Arthur bread flour. Then when I got home, I realized I already had some. Haha.

How does one know how much protein % Gold Medal or Bob's Red Mill has, when it's not on the package?
 

Arun L.

TVWBB All-Star
Here is my go to recipe, use a good bread flour like King Arthur
Dough

Makes 4 skins about 400g for 14” pizzas
Notes: water 65 degrees
Power flour or bread flour,
Water and salt in first, then add flour and yeast. Add oil after shaggy then mix on speed 2 for 6 minutes. Cut and ball and oil right away and into storage bags. Refrigerate for 48 hours
I have instant yeast from a jar. So I guess 1 teaspoon is about 3.73 grams?
 

Rich G

TVWBB Diamond Member
I bought the King Arthur bread flour. Then when I got home, I realized I already had some. Haha.

How does one know how much protein % Gold Medal or Bob's Red Mill has, when it's not on the package?
According to the BRM site it's 12-14%. I couldn't find the info for Gold Medal, but it seems it is typically lower.
 

Chuck-roaniecowpony

TVWBB Member
I'm a recovering pizzaholic. I started in on the obsession using my kitchen oven, bought a stone, then I made a steel plate, then I bought a Blackstone outdoor propane Neapolitan capable oven, then a stainless 2Stone propane Neapolitan oven. I started with thin cracker style and moved into Neapolitan. Pizzamaking.com was my hangout in those days. Still have the 2Stone and fire it up about once a year, usually to make some kids pizza.

Lots of different types of flour have passed thru our kitchen. The last type was for neo pizza and naturally was 00 Italian grind. I bought a few 55 lb (metric) bags of Caputo and some other brand. The higher gluten flours make for more substantial crumb, sometimes tough, if you cook it at moderate temps. Higher temps generally make more tender crumb (crust). I do neapolitan pizza with OO grind Italian flour around 11-12% gluten, about 63% hydration (by weight), simple dough with oil, salt, yeast, water, flour. No sugar for high temps. I cook at 825-850F. Takes about 80-100 seconds depending on the burner setting.

Some general tips/trends
  • higher temps = more tender crust
  • lower temps = more tough or hard crust
  • higher gluten flours = more substantial crust
  • lightly brush EVOO on the entire area to be topped, prior to topping and it will prevent soggy dough pizza from the wet sauce
  • sugar in dough will burn more easily at high cooking temps
  • pre-cook a thin pizza crust prior to topping for a crunchy cracker like crust
  • a good premium flour tortilla, pre-cooked, makes a great cracker (flatbread) crust
 
Last edited:

DanHoo

TVWBB Pro
I roll out crusts on parchment paper and can get them really thin when I want to.

Parchment helps slide pizza onto the the stone and stays for a couple of mins, then I pull it and give the pizza a 90 degree turn.
 

Richard in NS

TVWBB All-Star
I would use a saw. Personally, I use a chop saw to cut splits of oak down into chunks and do a several month supply at a time. Alternately - a hand saw would work just fine.
Make sure the sticks have been split first though. I was using the chop saw to cut round sticks and one rolled, binding the blade. It broke off the back guide on the saw and broke the cast motor housing. An Expensive bucket of wood chunks. I now clamp them in the workmate and cut them with the reciprocating saw.
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
This was something I started doing in recent attempts (the last time I made pizza was May 2020).

When I try M Andreyka's recipe, should I also do this?

@Tim Campbell, did you do this?
Sorry for the late reply I have been busy moving etc. No don’t pre bake with that recipe, it’s more of a New York style. I prefer to cook at a lower temp like 600 for a more crisp crust , when I do 8-900 degrees it comes out a lot softer.
 

M Andreyka

TVWBB Fan
I'm a recovering pizzaholic. I started in on the obsession using my kitchen oven, bought a stone, then I made a steel plate, then I bought a Blackstone outdoor propane Neapolitan capable oven, then a stainless 2Stone propane Neapolitan oven. I started with thin cracker style and moved into Neapolitan. Pizzamaking.com was my hangout in those days. Still have the 2Stone and fire it up about once a year, usually to make some kids pizza.

Lots of different types of flour have passed thru our kitchen. The last type was for neo pizza and naturally was 00 Italian grind. I bought a few 55 lb (metric) bags of Caputo and some other brand. The higher gluten flours make for more substantial crumb, sometimes tough, if you cook it at moderate temps. Higher temps generally make more tender crumb (crust). I do neapolitan pizza with OO grind Italian flour around 11-12% gluten, about 63% hydration (by weight), simple dough with oil, salt, yeast, water, flour. No sugar for high temps. I cook at 825-850F. Takes about 80-100 seconds depending on the burner setting.

Some general tips/trends
  • higher temps = more tender crust
  • lower temps = more tough or hard crust
  • higher gluten flours = more substantial crust
  • lightly brush EVOO on the entire area to be topped, prior to topping and it will prevent soggy dough pizza from the wet sauce
  • sugar in dough will burn more easily at high cooking temps
  • pre-cook a thin pizza crust prior to topping for a crunchy cracker like crust
  • a good premium flour tortilla, pre-cooked, makes a great cracker (flatbread) crust
I too hung out there a lot , the recipe I posted was pretty much given to me by Tom who recently passed away
 

 

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