Rotisserie Crispy Skin


 

THyde

TVWBB Guru
And you should thank Chuck, I sure do. He got me cooking these good and hot and that has made a huge difference! I hope yours comes out amazing!
 

Ed P

TVWBB Diamond Member
Ed I recommend cutting up the lemon from the zest, an onion and a garlic and stuffing the cavity with that. It gives the white meat a ton of flavor. I also cut up a clementine and threw that in too. Came out fantastic and cooking at about 480 the skin was sublime.
Oh My Darling! What is a clementine?

My wife, whom I love very much, is the white meat eater, I favor the dark. She has a very tender palate...she has threatened me with divorce over a pepper cheese sample that I told her wasn't hot, or the time I shined a very bright flashlight in her eyes. She thinks black pepper is spicy hot so I have to be careful with bold seasonings.
 

THyde

TVWBB Guru
Ha ha, well now I'm thinking that you spend your time slipping her pepper and spooking her with bright lights!

A clementine is like a miniature orange. Any citrus in the cavity gives the white meat a flavor boost, and it's not spicy. If she likes the Hey Grill Hey chicken in general, I'd say that adding citrus onion and garlic to the cavity only makes it better.
 

Ed P

TVWBB Diamond Member
The last couple of nights the temps have dipped down into the low 30s here and my poor citrus trees are showing the effects! We've got a couple of Washington Navel orange trees (poor George! Who would name a tree after someone's navel?), an Improved Meyer lemon tree (poor Meyer! Now the whole world knows he needed improvement!), and a Valencia orange tree (named Albert, whom I worked with, Albert Valencia, in honor of his bravery...he is the only guy I've ever known who had a colonoscopy done without anesthesia! When that ol' doctor twisted the endoscope to "go around the bend", he flopped over on the table with it, to hear him tell the story), and I just cleaned all the fruit off the trees in December. I only get one crop a year from the oranges but that darn lemon tree, twice a year I gotta pick fruit. Oy vey!
 

Joe Anshien

TVWBB Emerald Member
The last couple of nights the temps have dipped down into the low 30s here and my poor citrus trees are showing the effects! We've got a couple of Washington Navel orange trees (poor George! Who would name a tree after someone's navel?), an Improved Meyer lemon tree (poor Meyer! Now the whole world knows he needed improvement!), and a Valencia orange tree (named Albert, whom I worked with, Albert Valencia, in honor of his bravery...he is the only guy I've ever known who had a colonoscopy done without anesthesia! When that ol' doctor twisted the endoscope to "go around the bend", he flopped over on the table with it, to hear him tell the story), and I just cleaned all the fruit off the trees in December. I only get one crop a year from the oranges but that darn lemon tree, twice a year I gotta pick fruit. Oy vey!
Too bad you you on the other coast. I am selling one of these to keep your trees warm.
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THyde

TVWBB Guru
So today I saw that there was a way to make crispy skin chicken that I have not seen or heard of before. I guess it was a "viral Tik Tok" but I just read an article that said that there is a way to make baked / roasted / rotisserie'd chicken skin crispy. You're supposed to douse the chicken skin in boiling water before baking it. I might just try this on my next turned bird. Using any kind of rub (wet vs. dry) I surmise would be best after the boiling water dousing step. I'll let youz know if I try this.
 

Joe Anshien

TVWBB Emerald Member
So today I saw that there was a way to make crispy skin chicken that I have not seen or heard of before. I guess it was a "viral Tik Tok" but I just read an article that said that there is a way to make baked / roasted / rotisserie'd chicken skin crispy. You're supposed to douse the chicken skin in boiling water before baking it. I might just try this on my next turned bird. Using any kind of rub (wet vs. dry) I surmise would be best after the boiling water dousing step. I'll let youz know if I try this.
Interesting. How long does it get doused? Let us know how it works out.
 

A Lee

TVWBB Fan
So today I saw that there was a way to make crispy skin chicken that I have not seen or heard of before. I guess it was a "viral Tik Tok" but I just read an article that said that there is a way to make baked / roasted / rotisserie'd chicken skin crispy. You're supposed to douse the chicken skin in boiling water before baking it. I might just try this on my next turned bird. Using any kind of rub (wet vs. dry) I surmise would be best after the boiling water dousing step. I'll let youz know if I try this.

Isn't that what nandos chicken places do before grilling the chicken? They partially cook the chicken in water then finish it off on the grill.

Chinese bbq duck is "bathed" in hot water before it's roasted. The skin is also separated from the flesh before it's bathed with water.
 
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Ed P

TVWBB Diamond Member
So today I saw that there was a way to make crispy skin chicken that I have not seen or heard of before. I guess it was a "viral Tik Tok" but I just read an article that said that there is a way to make baked / roasted / rotisserie'd chicken skin crispy. You're supposed to douse the chicken skin in boiling water before baking it. I might just try this on my next turned bird. Using any kind of rub (wet vs. dry) I surmise would be best after the boiling water dousing step. I'll let youz know if I try this.
If dousing the whole bird, I wonder how that will play with the dry brining? Or are you removing the skin prior to dousing?
 

THyde

TVWBB Guru
I'm planning to dry brine, then I'll put the bird on the spit over the sink, boil a tea kettle's worth of water and pour it over the chicken over the sink. After that, I'll put on the rub and put it on the grill. I'm planning to do this in two days, so I'll let you know what happens!
 

THyde

TVWBB Guru
I doused the chicken in boiling water before cooking it tonight, I didn't notice any substantial benefit. In fact, last week's chicken was actually better. I figured I'd give it a try, but this time it didn't seem to do much. Although, when I poured the boiling water on it, the skin definitely tightened up. So it's hard to say whether there was much impact. I wish it was more definite, but it wasn't. I did use the dry "Susie / Chuck-O Hey Grill Hey" dry rub, maybe I'll try it again Peruvian.
 

Ed P

TVWBB Diamond Member
I think the fat that is on the backside of the skin is what is preventing the crisping. If there was a way of rendering that out, we'd have some success.

When I truss our chicken, I tuck the wing tips into the crease where the drumstick means the crown (breast) to keep them from being burned. Can that be done with the trussing gizmo?

This is the method I've been using for trussing.

 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
That fat is likely what is keeping the chicken meat moist. Although, getting rid of some of it might help getting a crisper skin. It would be a fine balance.
 

THyde

TVWBB Guru
I think that the meat won't get dry unless you go to too high an internal temperature. I've been cooking these things a lot, and never once have I produced a dry meat chicken. I really think that only happens if you actually overcook the whole chicken. Like, to an internal temperature of 190 or so. Anyway, EdP thanks, I'm always looking for new ideas to keep refining this! And Bruce, the skin crisp is a balance, in my mind it's a balance of temperature (I've had the best ones in the 450 to 500 range) and skin prep. Dry brining definitely helps a lot. The boiling water trick didn't really seem to do anything for this one, it actually looked less "done" than when I didn't do that. I will post a picture of this one.
 

Bruce

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Yep, I keep saying I need to pick up a bird and give the high heat method a shot. I keep forgetting.
 

THyde

TVWBB Guru
Can that be done with the trussing gizmo?
There is a place to tuck the wing tips with the "Turbo Trusser". I should take a picture of that next week for you. There are these hooks that span from the cavity back to the wings, and you can pin the tips into the long part of the hook. I'll put up a picture in a week.
 

Ed P

TVWBB Diamond Member
There is a place to tuck the wing tips with the "Turbo Trusser". I should take a picture of that next week for you. There are these hooks that span from the cavity back to the wings, and you can pin the tips into the long part of the hook. I'll put up a picture in a week.
Thanks, Tim! The trusser looks like a good idea, and after many years I'm just about out of twine. I always struggle when it comes to trussing and that's when I think I should buy one, but then, after dinner when I'm scrubbing the spit, forks, Meater and Smoke probes, and then stowing all the hardware l'm glad I can just throw the twine in the trash.
 

Joe Anshien

TVWBB Emerald Member
Cleaning up the rotisserie is not the most fun in the world. I guess the time it saves it pretty close to the time it takes to clean it, but I do think that the Turbo trusser is worth it though. The 3 key factors I think so far that lead to superior crispy skin for me are cooking 450-500°, dry brining, and cooking to internal of 170°.
 

Ed P

TVWBB Diamond Member
One thing I've started doing that I think might be worthwhile is after removing drumstick, thigh and wing...digging out the "wishbone" and then removing the entire side of breast and slicing it across the grain, as opposed to slicing it while it's on the bird.
 

 

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