Mixing Dough With A KitchenAid Mixer


 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I would definitely relocate the tank if you can. Some added plastic tubing will give you ability to move it to a safer location. I recall also back in my Realtor days seeing brine tanks and or combination units sitting next to water heaters, furnaces and what not and seeing those items rusting away badly and also seeing first hand damage to the heat exchangers when we went in for inspections after a sale and people needing to by new furnaces or water heaters LONG before they should have.
My current dilemma is my knees. I am finding carrying down 40 or 50# bags of salt is causing severe pain in my knee and one hip. I can still hoist up 2 bags at a time on my shoulders and carry them but the stairs are killing me. I may have to try relocating the brine tank upstairs. Maybe in the garage.
Hell getting old
 

Rusty James

TVWBB Emerald Member
Is this the best way to place a pizza stone on a gas grill?

The stone is setting on an old Whirlpool range broiler pan I saved from the landfill, and it fits my Silver C quite well. (That's a foil bag of wood chips on the right side)

March%2021%20084.jpg



Found another use for my brick trowel, lol...

March%2021%20085.jpg
 

Len Dennis

TVWBB Diamond Member
ANY way works as long as the stone gets up to around 500o. Takes about 30-45 min. Got one of those infrared surface readers?
 

Rusty James

TVWBB Emerald Member
ANY way works as long as the stone gets up to around 500o. Takes about 30-45 min. Got one of those infrared surface readers?

No surface reader to speak of, although my Thermal Pop gave a reading in excess of 600° just above the grate. I cracked my other stone on the charcoal grill, and I was worried about cracking this one - hence the use of the broiler pan.
 

Chris Allingham

Administrator
Staff member
A bit off topic, but I couldn't resist posting this vintage gas range. Anyone ever heard of this brand?...
Yes, a very common brand. My grandparents had one like this, but with chrome cooktop and a glass fold-down shelf instead of the white one shown here. Those suckers can last forever with proper maintenance.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Yep sure have. A number of years ago back in my Realtor days, I sold an old rural farm house in the far north of Boone Cty IL. The owner was still using a wood burning stove (huge one) to cook and bake. IIRC it was an Okeefe and Malley as well. It was so big and heavy we decided to sell the house with the old stove, while it was a put off for many of the potential buyers we finally found one buyer who loved the idea and actually was thrilled to find an old farmhouse with that stove and snapped the place up.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Those are REALLY good machines. Not as powerful as the 6qt units but WAY stronger and more reliable. Though in all likelihood the gearbox grease is solid as a rock. Som of the old Hobart machines I open up that grease is solid. Takes hours to clean out and get good stuff in it, but it's well worth the effort
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Actually not that "rare" I have 2 or 3 sitting here right now waiting for rebuilding. Though I tend to do these on an as ordered basis
 

BFletcher

TVWBB Emerald Member
So I'm here because I'm eyeing--from a distance right now--the KSM7586. @LMichaels #35 and 37 posts where he graciously pointed us to a YouTube disassembly vid has me wondering what under-the-hood care the casual home user should give to their investment. I'm not aware of such detail being provided in the user manual. I watched a few minutes of that vid and the guy illustrated and spoke with concern about no visible grease on the gears.

Would I need to plan for some scheduled disassembly maintenance? If so, how would I know at what interval that should occur?

Thanks!
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
No need on those really. Especially if new. The gear boxes on those are extremely well made and because it's completely isolated and no possible way for lube to leak out, you can pretty much run them for many years with no need for anything. Frankly that and the 8qt are outstanding units. There is also a smaller version of it (no longer made), that is a 6qt machine. It too is outstanding.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Platinum Member
No need on those really. Especially if new. The gear boxes on those are extremely well made and because it's completely isolated and no possible way for lube to leak out, you can pretty much run them for many years with no need for anything. Frankly that and the 8qt are outstanding units. There is also a smaller version of it (no longer made), that is a 6qt machine. It too is outstanding.
Can I infer that you prefer the DC motors of the Pro line are the better made units? I’ve been tracking the 8qt model for a while now. $799 is the “best” price I keep seeing. Would like your feedback and thoughts if you have some input to share, please.
 

Mark Foreman

TVWBB All-Star
Can I infer that you prefer the DC motors of the Pro line are the better made units? I’ve been tracking the 8qt model for a while now. $799 is the “best” price I keep seeing. Would like your feedback and thoughts if you have some input to share, please.
I have the pro line mixer. I really like it except for two things:
When there is a load on a beater, it emits a loud clicking. According to KA, this is normal. Sounds like it could you a preload bearing….
7 quarts is a BIG bowl. There is only the 2 of us, so I tend to use my KSM90 4.5 quart tilt head mixer much more.
I have been kneading bread dough in the 7 quart for well over 4 years (1 batch/week).

It’s candy apple red and I paid $749 for mine in December 2018.

Hope this helps…..
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
On the 7 and 8 qt machines you can use the 6qt bowl off the Pro 600. Even the same beaters and such. The only difference is the bowl height. You can also use a 5qt bowl but ONLY from the wide frame 5qt machines (called the Professional Plus). The other model(s) have a narrow frame like the K5xx series. So you have to be careful there.
The "Pro" models are VERY powerful but the gearboxes leave something to be desired. They use a worm gear design and while it can produce LOTS of torque they are VERY noisy, and as they come from the factory don't hold up as well. They are also prone to the planetary (the rotating piece your attachment goes on) simply falling off into the food you're making. When I rebuild them I do so with an eye to addressing the weaknesses of the gear box and the planetary. But even with that they're still not as strong as the motor/gear box combo in the Commercial and the 7qt models. And they're never as quiet. We can run our Commercial even if our little granddaughter is sleeping in her playpen. But, we could never do that with the other style known as Professional 600. This has more to do with mechanical (rather than electrical considerations). As believe it or not (even though the DC motor is hyped up) they ALL use DC motors. Everything from the simple little 4.5 qt Classic on up. All are DC with some type of PWM speed control. The smaller machines through a flyball governor (similar to your lawnmower engine) to actual sensor feedback on the larger machines. Only difference is the 7/8qt units use a DC Permanent Magnet motor. By their nature the motors alone are much quieter. I will post some photos in a bit of the a Professional 600 gearbox/motor with some highlights of the weak spots. Not meant to be a "how to" but simply informational
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Well,I really think I need to plan a trip in your direction so, I can drop the mixer for a “tune up”. Then we can have a “trussing” lesson as well.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Platinum Member
On the 7 and 8 qt machines you can use the 6qt bowl off the Pro 600. Even the same beaters and such. The only difference is the bowl height. You can also use a 5qt bowl but ONLY from the wide frame 5qt machines (called the Professional Plus). The other model(s) have a narrow frame like the K5xx series. So you have to be careful there.
The "Pro" models are VERY powerful but the gearboxes leave something to be desired. They use a worm gear design and while it can produce LOTS of torque they are VERY noisy, and as they come from the factory don't hold up as well. They are also prone to the planetary (the rotating piece your attachment goes on) simply falling off into the food you're making. When I rebuild them I do so with an eye to addressing the weaknesses of the gear box and the planetary. But even with that they're still not as strong as the motor/gear box combo in the Commercial and the 7qt models. And they're never as quiet. We can run our Commercial even if our little granddaughter is sleeping in her playpen. But, we could never do that with the other style known as Professional 600. This has more to do with mechanical (rather than electrical considerations). As believe it or not (even though the DC motor is hyped up) they ALL use DC motors. Everything from the simple little 4.5 qt Classic on up. All are DC with some type of PWM speed control. The smaller machines through a flyball governor (similar to your lawnmower engine) to actual sensor feedback on the larger machines. Only difference is the 7/8qt units use a DC Permanent Magnet motor. By their nature the motors alone are much quieter. I will post some photos in a bit of the a Professional 600 gearbox/motor with some highlights of the weak spots. Not meant to be a "how to" but simply informational
I think I used Pro model incorrectly. I’ve been tracking this model for a while and it’s Commercial.

KitchenAid KSM8990CU 8-Quart Commercial Countertop Mixer, 10-Speed, Gear-Driven, Contour Silver https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BJXYXYD1/?tag=tvwb-20

From my reading, these are the better motors than the “Pro” models as they have more torque for heavier dough loads (pizza or bread batches). Your thoughts?
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I think I used Pro model incorrectly. I’ve been tracking this model for a while and it’s Commercial.

KitchenAid KSM8990CU 8-Quart Commercial Countertop Mixer, 10-Speed, Gear-Driven, Contour Silver https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BJXYXYD1/?tag=tvwb-20

From my reading, these are the better motors than the “Pro” models as they have more torque for heavier dough loads (pizza or bread batches). Your thoughts?
Have to get ready soon to go out for my blood work UGH :( and then to PT appointment. I will be posting some photos soon once I have a chance to edit and highlight them. But, in a nutshell it's not the motors it's the gear boxes that make much of the difference.
 

 

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