Looking to get a gas grill - any suggestions?

Mark Foreman

TVWBB Member
I am looking to get a gas grill. I live in Sonoma CA and we are just passing 30 no burn spare the air days due to the fires. Looking at a
genesis II 335 or 435. I have never owned a gas grill.

I have a few questions.
SS vs cast iron grates?
Propane bottles - any preferred kind?
How hard to clean?
Wood box or foil pouch for smoke?

Thanks in advance....

Mark
 

Sam Bee

TVWBB All-Star
Both are great choices, it just depends on how much of a grilling area you need.
I'm for SS as it is much easier to maintain.
Any standard propane tank should do (Blue Rhino or Amerigas). If you can fill your own then even better.
Not really hard to clean, just scrape off the sides of the cookbox and whatever crud that collects at the bottom every 2 weeks or monthly.
I don't smoke with my gasser but I think some members here use foil pouch. I know there are aftermarket SS ones that you can buy. If you're coming from a WSM or even a kettle then I don't think the smoking will be as good in a gas grill like those two.

IMO, I would restore a Genesis 1000 or even a Silver B as I like those vintage grills and the burner setup (EW) are perfect for roti cooking. Those grills can be found for cheap or even free.
 

Mark Foreman

TVWBB Member
Thanks for the response. I plan to still hang onto my WSM and performer and add this to my arsenal.....

I'll look for a used 1000 or silver B. I live in the SF bay area so I will look around.
 

Jim C in Denver

TVWBB Super Fan
Agree with the recommendation above. For $150 or less you can get a 15 year old Genesis in good shape off FBMP or CL that will last you another 15 and for which Weber still supplies many replacement parts.

For smoking on a gasser, an AmazeN pellet tube works better than chips in a box or pouch.

All propane bottles are the same.

Most on here like heavy SS rods. I got rid of the SS grates because, while they worked well, the wife wanted them to be nice and shiny and I got tired of trying to do the impossible. Black seasoning (which is good) looks much better on black grates, and I like Weber's PC cast iron. Although I now mostly use GrillGrates (which is a whole other discussion).
 

Kyle in Woodstock

TVWBB Wizard
I would recommend you get stainless steel flavor bars and grates, but do not get one with stainless steel doors and lid. Get the porcelain enameled lid and doors, much easier to maintain.

There is really only 1 kind of propane bottle. The only other option would be to get a natural gas grill if you already have a line ran at your house.

If you are handy, buy one of the older Genesis grills and rehab it. Will be cheaper and probably last you longer than a new one. Only downside is that most the older ones are 3-burner. I've never had a need for anything more than 3 burners.

If you don't need a big gas grill, you should consider the Q series. The Q3200 is a really nice little cooker. I've got the older gen Q320 and it's my only gas grill. It has 393 sq. in. of space on the main cooking area versus 510 sq. in. on the E-310 Genesis. The Qs also have a cast aluminum lid and firebox, so they basically never rust (except for the grates).
 
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Jon Tofte

TVWBB Hall of Fame
I agree with Kyle's suggestion of a Q3200 if you only intend to use it for basic fast grilling such as steaks, burgers, chops or grilled chicken/fish.

If you prefer a bigger grill, then my favorite is this one - even if temporarily out of stock in that really nice crimson color:

 

Chris Kug

TVWBB Fan
Depends on what youn want. The 335 or 435 are both good choices. I like the SS grates, you don't have to worry about rusting or scratching the finish.
you can normally get the SS grates in the enamel finished top at Ace hardware and other stand alone retailers. if that is something you prefer over stainless topped

I have a Genesis II 440 that is similar to the 435. I like the room that the 4 burner grill offers me, both for large parties as well as indirect cooking. I find it cooks evenly. I don't have a sear burner, but I wish I did, I think the 35s now come with them.
 

Jon Tofte

TVWBB Hall of Fame
I would like to add that I would go with a refurbished "classic" Weber Genesis over any new grill. I only recommended the one I did based on the assumption that a new grill was what was wanted.
 

J Grotz

TVWBB All-Star
I am looking to get a gas grill. I live in Sonoma CA and we are just passing 30 no burn spare the air days due to the fires. Looking at a
genesis II 335 or 435. I have never owned a gas grill.
Whether you want a four burner or a three burner is a highly personal decision. But make that decision first. If you want a four burner, go buy a 435.

SS vs cast iron grates?
High quality SS rod grates will last a long long time with less upkeep than cast iron. The stock cast iron grates are coated with porcelain that at some point will flake off.

Propane bottles - any preferred kind?
Two camps: the bottle swappers and the bottle refillers. I'm a refiller because there's a UHaul nearby that only charges for the amount of propane you buy. Other vendors will charge a minimum to refill regardless of how much actually goes into your tank. Swapping is more convenient, but costs slightly more. If I did not have a UHaul nearby, I would be a swapper. I bought two pre-purged bottles at Costco this year.

How hard to clean?
Easy enough, though not as easy as a charcoal grill. Just keep on top of the grease. There's a grease pan, like a drawer, and under it a small disposable grease tray. I rehabbed an old Genesis 1000 and have been cooking on it for 6 months. It's my first gas grill. On a charcoal grill, most, if not all of the grease ends up in the ashes or a drip pan. On the gasser, it hits the flavorizer bars, drops onto the grease pan and eventually the grease tray. In 6 months I've wiped out the pan and replaced the tray 3 times. Once or twice a year Weber recommends scraping the flavorizer bars to loosen baked on crud.

Wood box or foil pouch for smoke?
I bought a V-shaped smoker box that fits into the flavor bars. I fill it with pellets. I'm happy with it and it imparts enough smoke flavor.

As for new or restored... I went the restoration route. I wanted a gasser for weeknight cooks and rotisserie cooking. The rotisserie is why I chose to restore over purchase new. As you face the grill, the burner tubes on old Weber gassers run left to right and the control valves are on the right. On new Weber grills the burner tubes run front to back with the control valves on the front. The old models are SUPERB at rotisserie cooking because the burner tubes run parallel to the spit. Picture a chicken on a spit. On the old grills, the heat source cooks evenly along the long axis of the bird. On new grills, it cooks from the head and tail inwards towards the middle. Weber figured this out and equips its top-of-the-line Summit grills with an infrared rotisserie burner that heats parallel to the spit. The Genesis II models do not have a rotisserie burner. If rotisserie is not important, get a new Genesis II. Like Jon, I'm smitten by the SE-330: beautiful open cart (they last longer than closed cabinet models), sear burner, 9mm stainless rod grates, stainless flavorizer bars, and that gorgeous red hood! But if you want/need the bigger area get the 435. You'll be cooking outside again as soon as it's delivered.

If you are not in a hurry, are a little handy and love rotisserie cooking, then find an old Genesis 1000-5000 or Silver/Gold/Platinum series grill to restore yourself.
Before.jpg
0D43B8CC-DD26-459A-A834-B06DB9BD6904.jpeg
 

Dave_C

TVWBB Member
Whether you want a four burner or a three burner is a highly personal decision. But make that decision first. If you want a four burner, go buy a 435.


High quality SS rod grates will last a long long time with less upkeep than cast iron. The stock cast iron grates are coated with porcelain that at some point will flake off.


Two camps: the bottle swappers and the bottle refillers. I'm a refiller because there's a UHaul nearby that only charges for the amount of propane you buy. Other vendors will charge a minimum to refill regardless of how much actually goes into your tank. Swapping is more convenient, but costs slightly more. If I did not have a UHaul nearby, I would be a swapper. I bought two pre-purged bottles at Costco this year.


Easy enough, though not as easy as a charcoal grill. Just keep on top of the grease. There's a grease pan, like a drawer, and under it a small disposable grease tray. I rehabbed an old Genesis 1000 and have been cooking on it for 6 months. It's my first gas grill. On a charcoal grill, most, if not all of the grease ends up in the ashes or a drip pan. On the gasser, it hits the flavorizer bars, drops onto the grease pan and eventually the grease tray. In 6 months I've wiped out the pan and replaced the tray 3 times. Once or twice a year Weber recommends scraping the flavorizer bars to loosen baked on crud.


I bought a V-shaped smoker box that fits into the flavor bars. I fill it with pellets. I'm happy with it and it imparts enough smoke flavor.

As for new or restored... I went the restoration route. I wanted a gasser for weeknight cooks and rotisserie cooking. The rotisserie is why I chose to restore over purchase new. As you face the grill, the burner tubes on old Weber gassers run left to right and the control valves are on the right. On new Weber grills the burner tubes run front to back with the control valves on the front. The old models are SUPERB at rotisserie cooking because the burner tubes run parallel to the spit. Picture a chicken on a spit. On the old grills, the heat source cooks evenly along the long axis of the bird. On new grills, it cooks from the head and tail inwards towards the middle. Weber figured this out and equips its top-of-the-line Summit grills with an infrared rotisserie burner that heats parallel to the spit. The Genesis II models do not have a rotisserie burner. If rotisserie is not important, get a new Genesis II. Like Jon, I'm smitten by the SE-330: beautiful open cart (they last longer than closed cabinet models), sear burner, 9mm stainless rod grates, stainless flavorizer bars, and that gorgeous red hood! But if you want/need the bigger area get the 435. You'll be cooking outside again as soon as it's delivered.

If you are not in a hurry, are a little handy and love rotisserie cooking, then find an old Genesis 1000-5000 or Silver/Gold/Platinum series grill to restore yourself.
View attachment 14173
View attachment 14174
I noticed you had a wire rack on the bottom in your original picture. What did you use bracket wise to incorporate the wood slats on the bottom?
 

J Grotz

TVWBB All-Star
I noticed you had a wire rack on the bottom in your original picture. What did you use bracket wise to incorporate the wood slats on the bottom?
They are SS z-bars from Dave Santana. I also bought grates and bars from him. His z-bars come with nice rounded corners and the screw holes are drilled. I ordered one z-bar too few; the z-bar on the flip table doesn't match the other six.
 

Dave_C

TVWBB Member
They are SS z-bars from Dave Santana. I also bought grates and bars from him. His z-bars come with nice rounded corners and the screw holes are drilled. I ordered one z-bar too few; the z-bar on the flip table doesn't match the other six.
Cant really tell in the pic, is there something that sets the slat spacing? Never mind I just looked at my side table, the holes the mount the slats are what sets the spacing.
 
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J Grotz

TVWBB All-Star
Cant really tell in the pic, is there something that sets the slay spacing?
The Dave in KC Penny Trick.
 

Andrew IBSP

TVWBB Fan
Whether you want a four burner or a three burner is a highly personal decision. But make that decision first. If you want a four burner, go buy a 435.


High quality SS rod grates will last a long long time with less upkeep than cast iron. The stock cast iron grates are coated with porcelain that at some point will flake off.


Two camps: the bottle swappers and the bottle refillers. I'm a refiller because there's a UHaul nearby that only charges for the amount of propane you buy. Other vendors will charge a minimum to refill regardless of how much actually goes into your tank. Swapping is more convenient, but costs slightly more. If I did not have a UHaul nearby, I would be a swapper. I bought two pre-purged bottles at Costco this year.


Easy enough, though not as easy as a charcoal grill. Just keep on top of the grease. There's a grease pan, like a drawer, and under it a small disposable grease tray. I rehabbed an old Genesis 1000 and have been cooking on it for 6 months. It's my first gas grill. On a charcoal grill, most, if not all of the grease ends up in the ashes or a drip pan. On the gasser, it hits the flavorizer bars, drops onto the grease pan and eventually the grease tray. In 6 months I've wiped out the pan and replaced the tray 3 times. Once or twice a year Weber recommends scraping the flavorizer bars to loosen baked on crud.


I bought a V-shaped smoker box that fits into the flavor bars. I fill it with pellets. I'm happy with it and it imparts enough smoke flavor.

As for new or restored... I went the restoration route. I wanted a gasser for weeknight cooks and rotisserie cooking. The rotisserie is why I chose to restore over purchase new. As you face the grill, the burner tubes on old Weber gassers run left to right and the control valves are on the right. On new Weber grills the burner tubes run front to back with the control valves on the front. The old models are SUPERB at rotisserie cooking because the burner tubes run parallel to the spit. Picture a chicken on a spit. On the old grills, the heat source cooks evenly along the long axis of the bird. On new grills, it cooks from the head and tail inwards towards the middle. Weber figured this out and equips its top-of-the-line Summit grills with an infrared rotisserie burner that heats parallel to the spit. The Genesis II models do not have a rotisserie burner. If rotisserie is not important, get a new Genesis II. Like Jon, I'm smitten by the SE-330: beautiful open cart (they last longer than closed cabinet models), sear burner, 9mm stainless rod grates, stainless flavorizer bars, and that gorgeous red hood! But if you want/need the bigger area get the 435. You'll be cooking outside again as soon as it's delivered.

If you are not in a hurry, are a little handy and love rotisserie cooking, then find an old Genesis 1000-5000 or Silver/Gold/Platinum series grill to restore yourself.
View attachment 14173
View attachment 14174
That 1000 of yours is absolutely stunning.
 

Mark Foreman

TVWBB Member
Wanted to let everyone know. I sold off a Chargriller Outlaw, a Smokey Joe, and have a WSM 22 about to go up for sale. My loving wife is getting me a shiny new Genesis II SE-335. She is not a big fan of smoked food but likes grilled food and this will fit the bill. That leaves me with a Performer Premium, WSM 14, AND THE NEW Genesis.

signed... happy camper
 

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