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Home Made Pasta - Atlas 150 Pasta Mill


 

GrantT

TVWBB Super Fan
So, off and on over the years, always wanted to take a stab at home made pasta. I was in a kitchen supply store and they had a Atlas 150 pasta machine on sale so picked one up on a whim.

So, had to try make some...surprising easy if I can do it first attempt! Bit of 00 flour, bit of semolina flour, and a few eggs. We had an impromptu dinner with a few friends that popped over and we ended up eating the pappardelle with a beef ragu I had left over from a previous cook. Everyone was commenting about how much better it was than dried/store pasta. I have to admit...it was very good and noticeably better.

Pics below...my first ever attempt at pasta dough, first use of the machine (rolled out and cut some fettuccini), and first pappardelle (drying on the hacked together rack). Made fettuccini alfredo with the first batch and pappardelle with beef ragu with the second.

I would recommend this machine if you get into the hobby...it's not super cheap at around $100 (Can), but is rock solid, and has a 10 year warranty too...there is an optional motor available as well.

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Rich G

TVWBB Platinum Member
Awesome, Grant! I got the same machine about 20 years ago, and it still works as well as it ever did. I frequently see these on CL around here for $50 or less, so worth looking if anyone else is interested.

What recipe did you use for your dough? It looks great!

Here's my current one......

Pasta for One (w/leftovers)
166g flour (2/3AP, 1/3 Semolina)
90g egg, oil (1 egg is ~45-50g, make up the rest with olive oil)
***For you bread bakers out there, the egg/oil is 54% of the total weight of the flour (not quite hydration, but close)

I most often make linguine, and occasionally will cut the sheets by hand into lasagna sizes for.....lasagna! :)

I LOVE homemade pasta!

R

EDIT: Prices are up a little from when I last looked, more people must be making pasta at home! :)

Atlas Pasta Maker - New - Complete $38
Atlas 150 Pasta maker $60
MARCATO Atlas 150 Pasta Machine, Made in Italy $60
Atlas 150 Pasta Machine $55
Atlas Marcato 150 Wellness Pasta Maker Machine Excellent $25
 
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GrantT

TVWBB Super Fan
Very similar recipe....

300g of flour (which I used about 220g 00, and 80g semolina), and 3 eggs, sprinkle of salt, sprinkle of pepper, sprinkle of EVOO. I think it was a little moist, so I just kept the bench flour flying as I kneaded it until it felt "right". From making pizza dough somewhat regularly, I was just going for that soft, silky feel with no stickiness.

Long as I kept the dough well floured, the machine just rolled it out like a dream...

Next time going to try mix in the food processor as well after watching some YouTube. This guy has inspired me to "wing it" a bit more...

 

Rich G

TVWBB Platinum Member
I'll definitely check that one out.....really like this one as a good primer on making pasta:


She has a great Bolognese video, too!

R
 

EricV.

TVWBB Pro
I have the same machine, I need to use it more often. Pasta is more of a winter cook for me, I have used it to make raviolis a few times.
 

Bob Bailey

TVWBB Pro
So, off and on over the years, always wanted to take a stab at home made pasta. I was in a kitchen supply store and they had a Atlas 150 pasta machine on sale so picked one up on a whim.

So, had to try make some...surprising easy if I can do it first attempt! Bit of 00 flour, bit of semolina flour, and a few eggs. We had an impromptu dinner with a few friends that popped over and we ended up eating the pappardelle with a beef ragu I had left over from a previous cook. Everyone was commenting about how much better it was than dried/store pasta. I have to admit...it was very good and noticeably better.

Pics below...my first ever attempt at pasta dough, first use of the machine (rolled out and cut some fettuccini), and first pappardelle (drying on the hacked together rack). Made fettuccini alfredo with the first batch and pappardelle with beef ragu with the second.

I would recommend this machine if you get into the hobby...it's not super cheap at around $100 (Can), but is rock solid, and has a 10 year warranty too...there is an optional motor available as well.

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View attachment 36639
Great machine. Got my wife one several years ago for Christmas. Got the ravioli maker attachment too. Nice setup, but she doesn't use it. I've made fettuccini a few times, lasagna noodles once and ravioli twice. All were easy to do and came out great.
 

JKalchik

TVWBB Guru
I'm not doing something right, my pasta is either tearing on the way through the rollers, or sticks horribly to itself.
 

Rich G

TVWBB Platinum Member
I'm not doing something right, my pasta is either tearing on the way through the rollers, or sticks horribly to itself.
J, tearing means the dough is too dry, sticking means it is too wet. How do you measure your ingredients? If you are using volumetric measures, those are often not very accurate. If you have the option to weigh your ingredients, that will make you more accurate, and, I find, much more repeatable! Once you do it a few times, you'll get a good feel for what it should be like.

If you have made your dough, and you find it to feel a bit tacky, don't be afraid to dust it with flour before putting it through the rollers. Sometimes, you might have to do this between every run through the rollers.....a pain, but a sign that the next time you make it, you should increase the amount of flour by a bit.

I have found my recipe, which uses 54% hydration to weight of flour to work pretty consistently (so.....if you have 100g flour, you should be adding 54g of egg + oil/water.....whatever your preference.)

Keep at it, you'll get it. Super rewarding to be able to very quickly whip up some pasta dough, and easy sauce! :)

R
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I don't really even measure. I just start putting things in the KitchenAid until they "feel" right. I wrap and allow to hydrate and than make sure to use plenty of bench flour. One other secret is I use just a bit of Extra Virgin Olive Oil in my dough. I have used a hand powered roller and even own a very nice Atlas one. But, I am not coordinated enough to feed sheets of dough and crank. Thank heavens for my KitchenAid
 

GrantT

TVWBB Super Fan
I'm not doing something right, my pasta is either tearing on the way through the rollers, or sticks horribly to itself.

I've only just started with the pasta doughs, but making pizza dough has taught me a lot. I think the first key is making sure your dough is in the correct ballpark before ever thinking about rolling/cutting - not too dry, not too sticky. Don't proceed to shaping until you are confident your dough is the proper hydration. I use roughly 100g of dry to 1 egg as a starting point (and use 1 egg per person - so for 4 servings - 4 eggs, 400g of dry), and when kneading either add a little more flour or a touch more liquid until it is soft, silky, and not sticky at all...I knead at LEAST 10 minutes while adjusting.

Then, after the dough has rested (while tightly wrapped), I use a generous amount of flour, both sides, while rolling/cutting...always make sure there are no sticky areas.
 

Rich G

TVWBB Platinum Member
@GrantT, thanks for the kick in the Atlas! Got a batch done today......I always laugh at the 1egg/100g flour per person thing.....this is 3/300, and that's WAY more than three servings....of course, there's not a thing wrong with some leftover pasta in the fridge. :)

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Mark Foreman

TVWBB All-Star
Wow. My Atlas Mercado 150 pasta machine is 40 years old and gets used quite often. I bought the KA pasta press attachment (not rollers). Not overly fond of it. It’s tricky to use. Has discs for spaghetti, bucatini, rigatoni, fusilli, large or small macaroni.

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Rich G

TVWBB Platinum Member
You're not Italian are you? In our household that would have been 1 serving LOL
When asked, my dad always said we were Prussian..... When my metabolism was higher, yeah, that would have been just enough for me and a small child! ;)
Wow. My Atlas Mercado 150 pasta machine is 40 years old and gets used quite often. I bought the KA pasta press attachment (not rollers). Not overly fond of it. It’s tricky to use. Has discs for spaghetti, bucatini, rigatoni, fusilli, large or small macaroni.
The design hasn't really changed in 40 years either, Mark......though you probably have metal parts where the newer ones likely have some plastic. :) I like the look of the extruded pasta, but I don't need another machine. I mess with some of the fancier, hand formed shapes when I get bored with capellini and linguine. :)

Maybe I'll make some raviolis this weekend.....been a while. Hmmm, pulled pork in the freezer.....BBQ ravioli?

R
 

GrantT

TVWBB Super Fan
Perfect!! (Well, that bottom-left one kinda freaks me out!) :)

Are those just laid out on a sheet and then another sheet over top then hand rolled/cut?
 

Rich G

TVWBB Platinum Member
Ha! I mangled that one trying to get some air out. :)

The easiest way to do ravioli without a tool is to roll a wide sheet, evenly place your filling down one half, wet between/down the side of the filling, then fold the sheet over the long way. Carefully press the air out as you seal, then cut however you want (knife, pasta wheel for fluted edges, etc.)

Tonight I used my ravioli maker/press. It looks like this:

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Layer sheet of pasts on the metal piece, use the plastic to gently indent the dough in the circles, fill/wet dough, fold pasta sheet over or layer another sheet on top then use a rolling pin to cut the individual ravioli along those raised/fluted edges. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KLPL1SE/?tag=tvwb-20
 

 

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