Grilled Chuck Roast


 

Tony R

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Mark this is beautiful! Why haven't you been posting more often? Very nice!
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Ditto what Rolf said... This plated pics look delicious. :wsm:
 

Gary S

TVWBB Guru
I'm wanting to try some chuck too. We have a deli nearby and they smoke their chuck everyday. Some sliced, some pulled. Your meal looks great Mark!
 

Rich Dahl

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Been starring at a frozen chuck roast in the freezer wondering what to do with it...... now its defrosting and I have the plan! Great cook Mark and thanks for sharing!
 

Darren C.

TVWBB Pro
This looks really good. I've been trying to decide on my menu for tomorrow. This is top of my list right now.

Being new to smoking, I have a couple of questions. What's the risk of drying it out? Would you remove it from the smoker by tenderness or temperature? Would brining or injecting it help?
 

Dwain Pannell

TVWBB Hall of Fame
This is right on time: I have two small-ish chucks I am planning for pulled beef for Sunday's Cowboy's game. Great plate photo!
 

Dwain Pannell

TVWBB Hall of Fame
I have a couple of questions:

1. Why use a pan? To catch juices?
2. Why not just cook it like a pork shoulder?

1. He wanted to catch the juices so he could de-fat then an incorporate into his finishing sauce.

2. You absolutely could.

I recommend doing two: one in a pan and without to see which one you and your family/friends prefer. ...and then be sure to post your cook and thoughts!
 

Mark Ritter

TVWBB Member
This looks really good. I've been trying to decide on my menu for tomorrow. This is top of my list right now.

Being new to smoking, I have a couple of questions. What's the risk of drying it out? Would you remove it from the smoker by tenderness or temperature? Would brining or injecting it help?

Thanks, everyone, for all the nice comments. Darren, I don't think there is much chance of it drying out as long as you check it frequently and remove it from the smoker when it first gets tender. I took these roasts to 195°. For about the last hour of the smoke, I wrapped them in foil just so I could capture the juices. I then skimmed the fat off the top of the juices and poured the remaining liquid back over the meat as I shredded it. It was far from dry. Unless you way overshot the internal temp of the meat (like taking it up to 210° or more) I think it would be moist and tender. If you cook it like a pork shoulder and do not have a pan under it, I would certainly return the juices that come out during shredding back to the meat. Just like a pork shoulder, chuck should be very forgiving. I'm sure it will turn out great for you as long as you don't way overcook or under cook it. As far as brining it or injecting it, I don't think that is necessary. There is plenty of fat in chuck to keep it moist, and I never like the additional salt that is usually added by the brining liquids.
 
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Darren C.

TVWBB Pro
Thanks Mark. My wife stopped by the store a few minutes ago and picked up two (I think) chuck roasts. We'll see how it goes tomorrow.
 

 

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