Cutting boards


 

Jay D in Jersey

TVWBB Super Fan
Never knew how handy a good cutting board was until my wife ordered a decent one. For years we just used the typical wood...bamboo or acacia cutting boards. A few months ago, we bought one of those hard rubber ones that Japanese chefs swear by. It was toast after one dimwitted run through the dishwasher.
We than went for the larger plastic type...which are OK. But...this John Boos with the stainless insert is worlds better than any...including the ones my late father-in-law made.
These things are heavy. We bought a second one for our beach house we like it so much. That one arrives early next week. It's 18"x18"x2.25"...and heavy. But it defines the counter space as a food prep area wherever it's placed.
You can use it as pictured or flip it upside-down.
 

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Russ in CFL

TVWBB Fan
I made my current board but love those Boos boards. I bought my sister a nice big one for this last Christmas. The cost really isn't terrible when comparing to buying the wood to make one. It really comes out to almost break even, at least around here.
 

Jay D in Jersey

TVWBB Super Fan
I can see that tray/insert being awfully handy for when I'm slicing up something like a brisket, but Boos really are pricey boards.
Agreed. A bit pricey. Paid about $225 for one from Bed Bath Beyond...with a 20% coupon. Bought the second one from El Campo Refrigeration...a food service industry supplier in TX. They have been great to deal with. That one was $216 shipped. The insert is great for meats and also great for placing chopped vegetables etc...when preparing a recipe.
 

Dustin Dorsey

TVWBB Hall of Fame
I got one for Christmas a few years back. It's massive. It doesn't have the tray but it has the groove on one side which is great for brisket.
 

C Lewis

TVWBB Pro
Have had that same Boos board in my wish list for quite some time now, just can never seem to pull the heavy trigger on it.
 

Mark Silver

TVWBB Pro
Have had that same Boos board in my wish list for quite some time now, just can never seem to pull the heavy trigger on it.
Same here.
I just bought this bamboo one which I like alot. I got as an Amazon Warehouse deal—Like New for a little more than half price. ($18.66)


Amazon's Choice
Butcher Block Cutting Board - Bamboo Chopping Block for Carving Meat - Reversible 17 x 13 x 1.5 Inch Wood Serving Tray wit...

Butcher Block Cutting Board - Bamboo Chopping Block for Carving Meat - Reversible 17 x 13 x 1.5 Inch Wood Serving Tray with Juice Groove and Spikes, Stabilizes Steak While Carving​

 

Scott Smith

TVWBB Super Fan
I have a board made by my grandfather for my mother that exactly covers the top of a standard kitchen range. This is really more useful for kneading dough than cutting.
 

Timothy F. Lewis

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I have a board made by my grandfather for my mother that exactly covers the top of a standard kitchen range. This is really more useful for kneading dough than cutting.
Right sizing for use is smart! It’s like any other tools, some are better suited for particular projects and need to be used accordingly.
 

Scott Smith

TVWBB Super Fan
Another consideration when thinking about pulling the heavy trigger on a nice cutting board is how it balances between being an actual tool and being a server. I have the stove-sized board from my mom, which could lay out a large hors d'oeurve course, a reversible maple one with the groove for carving turkey/ham/holiday items, and a thick olive wood board that often works as a cheese tray. The ones I cut on the most are plastic and go through the dishwasher.
 

Loc

TVWBB Fan
20 years ago, I lived in a place that had a John Boos table. For a 125 year old company, I was naively unaware of them. They manufacture in Illinois apparently, using domestic hardwood.

The Boos table was the centerpiece of the kitchen. Still dream of having a kitchen like that again.
 

Jay D in Jersey

TVWBB Super Fan
20 years ago, I lived in a place that had a John Boos table. For a 125 year old company, I was naively unaware of them. They manufacture in Illinois apparently, using domestic hardwood.

The Boos table was the centerpiece of the kitchen. Still dream of having a kitchen like that again.
Seems like they use Maple, Cherry and Walnut for the most part.
 

 

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