Cooking a steak


 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I know I have posted shots of my own finished steaks using a method of grilling similar to what this woman is doing but with a pan method. I keep seeing people going on about how they gotta have temps like the surface of the sun or they can't make a good steak. While what I do is not exactly this, it is very similar in it's theory and in it's outcome.................A beautifully cooked steak with edge to edge rosy finish and no gray band.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Not at all. simply illustrating the "theory". Note I made the distinction I'm using a grill but using the same "theory" of getting a good steak
 

JSaus

TVWBB Pro
I get similar results on my gasser. I use the sear station for a couple minutes a side and move to indirect cooking, flipping the steaks several times. Forms a nice crust by the time it is done. As mentioned, got to be thick steaks.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Diamond Member
Me as well. But, I rarely will cook a steak not at least 1.5" thick. Usually for my wife and what she has me do to meat will be sending me to hell anyway so it really doesn't matter :D
yeah, 1.5" to 2" make for some amazing steaks. i do prefer the hard sear with lots of crusting on the outside. but everyone enjoys steak how they like em so there is no "right" way, just which one is right for your enjoyment.
 

Jim C in Denver

TVWBB All-Star
The key to that cold sear technique is that the chef is using hot metal in contact with the steak surface (i.e. conduction energy transfer). The cook is almost entirely via conduction. The classic method (pan then oven) cooks first by conduction, then second by convection (hot air).

Conduction delivers heat energy much more efficiently than convection (hot air) or IR radiation. So you can build up a better Maillard crust at a lower temp.

And heat is being transferred to the inside of the steak by efficient conduction as well. Basically, the outside of the steak cooks the inside of the steak via conduction energy transfer. Because of the efficiency of conduction, you can use a lower temp and still get the job done. And the frequent flips keep the conduction/sear effect from going too far. Which is easy to do when using hot metal.

That conduction-based technique should work well with any griddle, flat top, cast iron pan or (dare I say it) the flat side of GGs. Less well on a gasser producing mostly convection heat -- which is why many gassers now have extra sear burners or IR burners.

Charcoal cooks mostly via IR radiation, which is a different ballgame.
 
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EricV.

TVWBB All-Star
Not to be a "Debbie Downer" but after watching that video, my response is not about the methods, they all work, plus others that weren't mentioned. My point is & I will continue to state this, a good steak regardless of thickness revolves around the grade of beef. You can't get "blood out of a turnip," it's all about the marbling, that's where the flavor lies!
 

John K BBQ

TVWBB All-Star
This is a good thread, Iots of good comments by everyone. The video sort of validates the "Just Keep Flipping" method I've seen on other YT channels. I post quite a few of my steak cooks here on the forum but to be honest, I don't nail it every time. Most of the steaks I get are 1" to 1.25" thick or less, and I think my process (or habits) are set around nailing that kind of steak and my results aren't as good when I happen into some thicker cuts. I'll try the lower heat, flip often technique sometime soon.
 

LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
I think everyone is missing the point I was trying to make. I get a GREAT hard crust all over and I don't run my grill at the temp of the sun. Anyway I threw this out there because it kind of mimics what I do on the grill only she's using a pan.
 

Jim C in Denver

TVWBB All-Star
There's a few things going on with that cook to note:

1. The Just Keep Flipping method (aka, the "human rotisserie") absolutely works. Both Kenji and Meathead endorse it. I started to fool around with it recently and it does have some advantages to the old fashioned flip once method. Interestingly, most times it is recommended for high heat cooking. When using higher heat, you flip like every 30 seconds. Since this cook is going lower heat, notice that the flip times are longer -- like two minutes.

2. Using a pan (i.e. hot metal in contact with the steak; i.e. conduction). Conduction is the most efficient browning method. It is how/why you get grill marks and why a cast iron skillet works so well. The conduction efficiency allows for better browning at lower temp.

3. Using a completely dry non-stick pan. The surface of the steak needs to dry out first before it can brown/crust. Since this method uses a non-stick pan with zero oil, it is a very dry cook. So it browns better, even at lower heat.

Thanks for posting Larry. Interesting stuff. There's more than one way to get to Baltimore.
 

Ryan Burke

TVWBB Fan
When I do steaks I get my Genesis really hot, put the steaks on and turn the burners to low. I only flip once. I think cooking the steak to the desired temp is the most important step. I prefer mine medium rare. My parents for some reason like theirs well done. I never cook steaks when they come to visit because I have no idea how to cook a well done steak.
 

Brett-EDH

TVWBB Diamond Member
When I do steaks I get my Genesis really hot, put the steaks on and turn the burners to low. I only flip once. I think cooking the steak to the desired temp is the most important step. I prefer mine medium rare. My parents for some reason like theirs well done. I never cook steaks when they come to visit because I have no idea how to cook a well done steak.
155F and rest it (160F is the done temp by definition), use a thermometer. or go for the shoe leather look. some people just like to chew all the way through tomorrow with each bite.
 

ChrisGariepy

New member
One of the coolest ways I ever cooked a steak!! Caveman style
 

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JSaus

TVWBB Pro
I will not fix steaks for some of my in-laws as they demand so well done that there is no tinge of pink left. They get pork and chicken from me.
 

TonyUK

TVWBB Guru
I have found that steak is one of those things I can screw up if I'm not paying attention. I have annoyingly done it on occasion in the past.
I don't subscribe to the "let-the-steak-come-up-to-room-temp-before-cooking" mantra. I cook mine, already prepped, chilled from the fridge.
This allows me to put it over high heat to get a good crust without fear of overcooking. I flip every minute until I'm happy with the crust. Move it over to indirect, stick a probe in it, and wait for it to come up to desired IT.
I serve immediately, no rest. :eek:

This method has never failed me......yet! I always buy a good quality steak, minimum of 1.5" thick. (Leftover steak and eggs for breakfast the next morning is a bonus).
I never order steak at a restaurant anymore. I'm always disappointed, as I can cook them much better......and for around 1/3 of the price to boot.
 
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LMichaels

TVWBB 1-Star Olympian
Oh I hear ya on easily wrecking a steak unwittingly. Just did it the other day. (well not "ruined" but nit good work). I pulled out one of my nice prime strips from the freezer. Thawed it, S&P only and onto the pellet grill. Two things I did wrong because it was on the pellet grill. One I did not realize which was, I typically season my very thick steaks on heavy side. But, because of the fan and the way the pellet grill cooks, the meat surface stays drier and seasoning does not "sweat" off as it would on the gasser. So it was over seasoned (especially with pepper) even though I used no more than I normally would on that large a steak. The other (I knew but forgot) is on high temps how quickly the pellet grill will cook (again that fan) and I decided to trust my new BT829 remote thermometer rather than my instinct. So the steak ended up cooked to more like 140 than my normal 120 and a rest. My wife liked it, but she still put some back on LOL. IT was still juicy and VERY tender and had I not over seasoned it, would have be delicious still. I still have lots to learn about that grill
 

 

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