Apple-Brined Whole Turkey


 

JustinL

TVWBB Pro
Ron,

I haven't tried it at a lower temp but I can say that I tried this recipe last Thanksgiving for my first try at smoking and it came out amazing. Very moist and lots of flavor with a good amount of smoke. We were all very happy with the results. Sorry I can't help you with any of your questions just thought I'd give you my impressions of this recipe.

Let us know if you decide to go low and how it turns out.

Justin
 

Ron G.

TVWBB Wizard
Thanks for the pointers, guys -

I was not thinking "low & slow" - rather, I was just thinking of slowing it down just a bit (going for 4-6 hours, maybe)

I know that low & slow usually isn't the best for poultry.

I'm going to stick-to the recipe for my first try, and then see if I feel the need to mess with it on the next go-round.
 

Ron G.

TVWBB Wizard
Turned out GREAT!

On top of it, this was my first cold-weather smoke.

Had a hard time getting lid temp over about 350 - but it held in the 300-350 range all afternoon.

14-pound bird took about 5 hours
Basted the skin at about 3 hours with mix of butter / olive oil - crisped-up nicely.

This recipe is definitely a "keeper"
 

Ben Leyhew

TVWBB Member
I did the recipe for Easter and I have to say everyone enjoyed the turkey. However, I did have an issue with the temperature and length of cook time. On my 18" WSM, I kept it dead on 275 and anticipated smoking a 13 lb turkey for about 6 hours (roughly 30 minutes per lb). This would have worked perfectly as the turkey would be done just as I got done with church. Unfortunately, it was done after only 4 hours of smoking at 275 on the lid temp. I know this is not always accurate, but didn't expect it to be done so quick! I used a mixture of Kingsford brickets, natural lump charcoal and apple wood chips. I used one chimney of hot coals on top of one chimney of unlit coals. Internal temp of the bird was at 188 when I got home and pulled it immediately. Luckily, the overnight brine and injection with unsalted butter kept the turkey fairly moist. I think it would have turned out even better had I been able to pull it at 11 (during the Church service). Will definitely do this recipe again. It took some planning during the week: bought the bird on Tuesday, thawed it in the fridge for two days, brined it for 24 hours, let air dry in the fridge and then smoked it on Sunday morning. I will try it again with a 4 hour time frame and expect it to be even better.
 

Ben Leyhew

TVWBB Member
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Here is a pic after just putting it on this morning. Unfortunately, I couldn't get a final shot since everyone started eating it right away. Thank you for such a great recipe!
 

DWolf

TVWBB Member
Ron,
I've made stock from brined birds often with very good results. The amount of salt that remains in the carcass is really minimal and hardly detectable, if at all. Also, since the applications for turkey stock (e.g., soup, sauces) usually require some salt anyway, you're unlikely to have a problem provided you taste as you go and avoid over-salting.
 

Ryan P.K.

TVWBB Pro
Well gentlemen, I gave the Apple Brine receipt a try. Holy smoke that turkey was good! I am not much of a turkey eater, nor is my family, but I thought I would give it a try. Well, lets say that’s how we are having turkey for Thanksgiving this year. I smoked a #12 bird @ 300 for 3.5 hours. When smoking poultry, I like to use cherry wood. What do you guys think about using this brine for a pork butt?
 

Tim (the grillaholic)

TVWBB Super Fan
Ron, I also will be trying my hand at smoking only the turkey breast. I actually hope to try it this weekend. I think what I will do, is adjust the size of the resipe to the weight of my turkey breast, and cook to a temp, not really a time. Let me know how your smoke goes, I hope to post pics after mine is completed.
Good luck, Tim
wsmsmile8gm.gif



18.5 WSM, Genisis E320 gasser, Backyard Pro Commercial charcoal
 

Ron G.

TVWBB Wizard
I did a very simple turkey breast (bone-in) a few months ago, with just a little "spur-of-the-moment" rub.

Cooked it at a relatively high temperature, with about half the smoke wood I would normally use for pork shoulder.

Turned out great (maybe just a little dry) Made some mighty-fine turkey sandwiches / club sammies for a few days. I think that the brining would make this even better.
 

Paul Harrington

New member
Hello everybody, planning on trying the Apple-brined bird for Tksgiving. My first time to have freinds and family over for the holiday and really want to wow them. I feel confident re cooking the bird but I'm unsure about how to handle the gravy. Doesn't have to be giblet gravy but it does need to be Turkey Gravy.
I've read Chris' hints about how to collect the drippings but how do I get from there to gravy?
Your help will be greatly appreciated - especially by my guests.
Thanks - Paul
 

Dave Davis

New member
I just carved my first ever attempted apple brined turkey. It ws a 13 pound bird and I cooked it at about 260 for 5 hours. All I can say is WOW, this is by far the best turkey I have ever cooked. Thanks to all for the tips.
 

 

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