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Thread: How to grill a perfect steak?

  1. #31
    TVWBB 1-Star Olympian Bob Correll's Avatar
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    Our local PBS Create channel has a Project Fire marathon going.
    Steven just cooked 2 large tomahawk steaks on a hot gasser and pulled them at 135 internal.
    It made me cringe, because the carryover heat, while resting, no doubt took them closer to medium than medium rare.

  2. #32
    Moderator Chris Allingham's Avatar
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    One more nail in the coffin of "don't poke holes in meat", from well-respected Cook's Illustrated magazine.

    "A widespread belief holds that piercing meat with a fork during cooking should be avoided since it allegedly allows precious juices to escape. To put this theory to the test, we cooked two sets of five steaks to medium-rare. We gently turned one set with a pair of tongs, the other by jabbing the steaks with a sharp fork. We then compared the raw and cooked weights of each steak. Both sets of steaks lost exactly the same amount of moisture during cooking—an average of 19.6 percent of their weight. The reason: Virtually all moisture that is lost when meat is cooked is a result of muscle fibers contracting in the heat and squeezing out their juices. Piercing does not damage the fibers enough to cause additional juices to leak out (any more than poking a wet sponge with a fork would expel its moisture).

    "When it comes to the moisture level and tenderness of meat, cooking time and temperature are the most important factors."

  3. #33
    TVWBB Pro Lynn Dollar's Avatar
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    Meat is not a sponge. Juices don't flow through the meat.

    Easy proof of that is do the opposite and inject meat.
    2002 18" WSM , 1999 22 Kettle , 1983 Smokey Joe , 2019 26" Kettle , 2016 Spirit 3 Gasser , Old Country Brazos offset smoker

  4. #34
    TVWBB Platinum Member Dustin Dorsey's Avatar
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    Some people like their ribeyes at medium. I believe medium is the standard for SCA competitions. If I see 125 on my thermopen I pull it. I prefer rare to medium rare. If I mess up and cook one to medium I'm not going to cry over it.
    22.5 WSM, 22.5 OTS, Smokey Joe, Genesis 1000, Slow N Sear 2.0, Smokenator 1000, Old Country Pecos, Thermapen, Smoke, Maverick ET-732, Igrill 2

  5. #35
    TVWBB 1-Star Olympian Bob Correll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dustin Dorsey View Post
    Some people like their ribeyes at medium. I believe medium is the standard for SCA competitions. If I see 125 on my thermopen I pull it. I prefer rare to medium rare. If I mess up and cook one to medium I'm not going to cry over it.
    I think it was member Bryan S, of roadside chicken fame, who said he likes his ribeyes cooked to medium to help break down any connective tissue.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim H. View Post
    I also have the E-330 gas grill, with the searing burner.
    I use the reverse sear method to cook my steaks. I discovered this about two years ago, and it is the only way I now cook steaks, particularly rib-eyes.

    Let steak sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes before putting on grill.
    Turn on two burners and leave the other burner off. Heat the grill to about 300 F.
    Place steak over UNLIT burner, with an internal thermometer inserted. Leave steak on until internal temp is about 80 deg. (10-15 minutes)
    Flip steak over and let internal temperature rise to 100 degrees (about 10 minutes).
    Remove steak from grill and cover. Turn up searing burners to high.
    Add steak to searing burner for one minute, rotate 90 degrees and cook another 1 minute.
    Flip steak over and repeat on other side, rotating once (2 minutes on this side total)
    Remove steak when internal temp reaches 130 to 135 deg (for medium rare). Pink center with no blood.
    Cover steak and let rest for 5 to 8 minutes. Internal temp will rise to about 140.

    Never cut into a steak when it is on the grill. Use tongs to turn the steak, never use a meat fork, otherwise the steak will loose all of its juices.
    The first time I cut into a steak is when it is on my plate.
    For steaks thicker than 1 1/2 inches, I find it better to get the internal temp to 110 deg on the indirect cook.
    do you set your burners on the highest setting?

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMichaels View Post
    "Perfect" is in the eye of the beholder
    Absolutely agree! But it seems someone finds a formula of the perfect steak. What do you think, it will be good?

  8. #38
    TVWBB Hall of Fame LMichaels's Avatar
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    Will what be good?

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake PA View Post
    do you set your burners on the highest setting?
    For the indirect cook when the steak is over the Unlit burners, the other burners are set at a low setting (less than 300 deg F on the grill thermometer).
    For the final direct cook, the burners are on high, close to the highest setting (about 600 deg F on the grill's thermometer). The steak is over these lit burners.
    22.5 OTG , Genesis EP-330 with rotisserie, Jumbo Joe

  10. #40
    TVWBB Fan J Grotz's Avatar
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    Cooking the perfect steak, that's third rail material right there. Are we sure we wouldn't rather discuss religion or politics?

    The best steaks I have ever grilled start with ... the best steaks. I second Larry's endorsement of Costco prime. We buy most of our meat there. We're also lucky enough to have a butcher nearby that dry ages sides of beef, and that's even better.

    I have two go-to techniques. My DW's favorite is from America's Test Kitchen (ATK). It's cooked in a CI skillet, turning frequently to build up the perfect crust. ATK does it indoors, but it makes a helluva mess and I don't have a crew of sous chefs to clean up afterwards, so I cook it outside on a camp stove. It would also work great with the CI on a gasser.

    My favorite is a two-step process: sous vide, followed by finishing in the CI skillet over the camp stove. Finishing in a gasser or charcoal grill would be preferable, but I'm still looking for an old genny and I can't waste charcoal for 2 minutes of searing. When the menu allows (grilled veggies or other sides), I do finish the steaks over charcoal.

    The ATK technique puts the best crust, bar none, on a steak. The sous vide technique gives a more tender result. Both are perfection to me.
    18.5" 22.5"

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